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Author: Yang, Tse-Chuan
Resulting in 7 citations.
1. Kim, Seulki
Yang, Tse-Chuan
The Causal Effects of Cumulative Father Presence on Children's Academic Performance: The Role of Behavior Problems
Presented: Austin TX, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2019
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Children, Academic Development; Fathers, Presence; Modeling, Structural Equation

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Though the role of father in child development has received a considerable scholarly attention, little is known about whether cumulative father presence has a salient effect on child's academic performance. Using data from the NLSY79 and the NLSY79CYA from 1986 through 2014 for children between the ages of 7 and 14, the effect of cumulative father presence and potential mechanisms through which cumulative father presence affects children's academic performance were examined. The multilevel structural equation modeling (MSEM) results suggest that cumulative father presence has a direct and positive effect on children's academic performance, even after accounting for potential changes in household and maternal characteristics, as well as children's development over time. The effect of father presence on children's academic performance is mediated through externalizing behavior problems, but not by internalizing behavior problems.
Bibliography Citation
Kim, Seulki and Tse-Chuan Yang. "The Causal Effects of Cumulative Father Presence on Children's Academic Performance: The Role of Behavior Problems." Presented: Austin TX, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2019.
2. Park, Kiwoong
Yang, Tse-Chuan
The Long-term Effects of Self-Esteem on Depression: The Roles of Alcohol and Substance Use During Young Adulthood
The Sociology Quarterly 58,3 (2017): 429-446.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00380253.2017.1331718
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Depression (see also CESD); Gender Differences; Self-Esteem; Substance Use

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using the National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth 1979, this study examines the roles of alcohol and substance use as mediators in the mechanism between self-esteem and depression, and investigates whether the mechanism works for both men and women. Results demonstrate that alcohol and substance use during young adulthood mediates the effect of self-esteem on depression among men. Furthermore, self-esteem during young adulthood remains a determinant of high depression in middle adulthood. However, we did not find evidence to support that same mechanism among women. Our findings provide insight into how self-esteem affects depression over the transition from young to middle adulthood, and elucidate potential gendered responsivity to low self-esteem.
Bibliography Citation
Park, Kiwoong and Tse-Chuan Yang. "The Long-term Effects of Self-Esteem on Depression: The Roles of Alcohol and Substance Use During Young Adulthood." The Sociology Quarterly 58,3 (2017): 429-446.
3. Yang, Tse-Chuan
Chen, I-Chien
Choi, Seung-won
Linking Perceived Discrimination During Adolescence to Health During Middle Adulthood: The Mechanisms Through Self-Esteem and Risk Behaviors
Presented: Washington DC, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, March-April 2016
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Discrimination; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Modeling, Structural Equation; Risk-Taking; Self-Esteem

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Little is known about the long-lasting effect of perceived discrimination on health and even less is about the mechanisms linking perceived discrimination to health over time. We argued that the discriminatory experience during adolescence not only directly affects one's health during middle adulthood, but also indirectly influences health through self-esteem and risk behaviors during early adulthood. Applying structural equation modeling to the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979, we obtained three key findings: (1) The discriminatory experience during adolescence imposes an adverse impact on one's health during middle adulthood even after accounting for other potential covariates; (2) The perceived discrimination during adolescence reduces self-esteem during early adulthood, which in turn undermines the health during middle adulthood; and (3) The discriminatory experience promotes risk behaviors in early adulthood and the risk behaviors compromise the health during middle adulthood. Our findings highlight the importance of early intervention in coping with perceived discrimination.
Bibliography Citation
Yang, Tse-Chuan, I-Chien Chen and Seung-won Choi. "Linking Perceived Discrimination During Adolescence to Health During Middle Adulthood: The Mechanisms Through Self-Esteem and Risk Behaviors." Presented: Washington DC, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, March-April 2016.
4. Yang, Tse-Chuan
Chen, I-Chien
Choi, Seung-won
Kurtulus, Aysenur
Linking Perceived Discrimination during Adolescence to Health during Mid-adulthood: Self-esteem and Risk-Behavior Mechanisms
Social Science and Medicine 232 (July 2019): 434-443.
Also: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0277953618303125
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Discrimination; Health, Mental; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Modeling, Structural Equation; Risk-Taking

Rationale: The literature on the effect of perceived discrimination on health has three gaps. First, the long-term relationship between perceived discrimination and health is underexplored. Second, the mechanisms through which perceived discrimination affects health remain unclear. Third, most studies focus on racial/ethnic discrimination, and other aspects of discrimination are overlooked.

Objective: This study aims to fill these gaps by testing a research framework that links the discriminatory experience during adolescence to an individual's health during mid-adulthood via self-esteem and risk behaviors at early adulthood.

Method: Structural equation modeling is applied to the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1979 Cohort (N = 6478).

Results: The discriminatory experience during adolescence imposes an adverse impact on health during mid-adulthood even after accounting for other potential covariates, a detrimental effect lasting for over 30 years. In addition, while perceived discrimination reduces self-esteem at early adulthood, it affects only mental health during mid-adulthood, rather than general health. Finally, the discriminatory experience promotes risk behaviors at early adulthood and the risk behaviors subsequently compromise health during mid-adulthood.

Bibliography Citation
Yang, Tse-Chuan, I-Chien Chen, Seung-won Choi and Aysenur Kurtulus. "Linking Perceived Discrimination during Adolescence to Health during Mid-adulthood: Self-esteem and Risk-Behavior Mechanisms." Social Science and Medicine 232 (July 2019): 434-443.
5. Yang, Tse-Chuan
Chen, I-Chien
Choi, Seung-won
Kurtulus, Aysenur
Linking Perceived Discrimination during Adolescence to Health during Middle Adulthood via Self-esteem and Risk Behaviors
Presented: Montreal, QC, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2017
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Discrimination; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Life Course; Modeling, Structural Equation; Risk-Taking; Self-Esteem

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The literature on the effect of perceived discrimination on health has three gaps. First, the causality between perceived discrimination and health is underexplored. Second, the mechanisms through which perceived discrimination affects health remain unclear. Third, most studies focus on racial/ethnic discrimination and other aspects of discrimination are overlooked. This study aims to fill these gaps by testing a research framework that links the discriminatory experience during adolescence to one's health during middle adulthood via self-esteem and risk behaviors at early adulthood. Applying structural equation modeling to the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979, we obtained three key findings: (1) The discriminatory experience during adolescence imposes an adverse impact on one's health during middle adulthood even after accounting for other potential covariates, a detrimental effect lasting for over 30 years; (2) While perceived discrimination reduces self-esteem at early adulthood, it affects only mental health during middle adulthood, rather than general health; and (3) The discriminatory experience promotes risk behaviors at early adulthood and the risk behaviors subsequently compromise the health during middle adulthood. Using a life course perspective, we found that the effect of perceived discrimination is more profound than the literature suggested and that risk behaviors may account for approximately 17% of the total effect of perceived discrimination on health. Our findings highlight the importance of early intervention in coping with perceived discrimination during adolescence, a critical life stage where one develops his/her personality.
Bibliography Citation
Yang, Tse-Chuan, I-Chien Chen, Seung-won Choi and Aysenur Kurtulus. "Linking Perceived Discrimination during Adolescence to Health during Middle Adulthood via Self-esteem and Risk Behaviors." Presented: Montreal, QC, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2017.
6. Yang, Tse-Chuan
South, Scott J.
Neighborhood Effects on Body Mass: Temporal and Spatial Dimensions
Social Science and Medicine 217 (November 2018): 45-54.
Also: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0277953618305513
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): American Community Survey; Body Mass Index (BMI); Census of Population; Geocoded Data; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Neighborhood Effects; Obesity

Research examining the effects of neighborhood characteristics on obesity and excess body weight has generally neglected the influence of both life-course exposure and geographically-proximate communities. Using data on 9357 respondents to the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1979 Cohort, in conjunction with tract-level data from the 1980-2010 U.S. censuses, this study examines how black, Hispanic, and white individuals' cumulative exposure to varying levels of neighborhood poverty and co-ethnic density from their mid-teens through mid-adulthood, as well as the levels of poverty and co-ethnic density in nearby, or "extralocal," neighborhoods, are associated with their body mass index (BMI). Fixed-effect regression models show that, among Hispanics and whites, cumulative exposure to co-ethnic neighbors is a stronger positive predictor of BMI than the co-ethnic density of the immediate, point-in-time neighborhood. Among whites, cumulative exposure to neighborhood poverty is a stronger positive predictor of BMI than is the poverty rate of the current neighborhood of residence. And among both blacks and whites, the distance-weighted poverty rate of extralocal neighborhoods is significantly and inversely related to BMI, suggesting that relative affluence in nearby neighborhoods engenders relative deprivation among residents of the focal neighborhood, leading to increased BMI. Overall, the results suggest that greater attention to both the temporal and spatial dimensions of neighborhood effects has the potential to enhance our understanding of how neighborhoods affect obesity and related health outcomes.
Bibliography Citation
Yang, Tse-Chuan and Scott J. South. "Neighborhood Effects on Body Mass: Temporal and Spatial Dimensions." Social Science and Medicine 217 (November 2018): 45-54.
7. Zhang, Weihui
Yang, Tse-Chuan
Maternal Smoking and Infant Low Birth Weight: Exploring the Biological Mechanism Through the Mother's Pre-pregnancy Weight Status
Population Research and Policy Review published online (12 October 2019): DOI: 10.1007/s11113-019-09554-x.
Also: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11113-019-09554-x
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Birthweight; Mothers, Health; Pre/post Natal Behavior; Smoking (see Cigarette Use); Weight

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Maternal smoking has been found to adversely affect birth outcomes, such as increasing the odds of having low birth weight infants. However, the mechanisms explaining how a mother's smoking is linked to a child's low birth weight status are underexplored. This study merged two nationally representative datasets in the United States (US)--the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY79) and the NLSY79 Child and Young Adult (NLSYCYA)--to examine whether maternal weight status before pregnancy serves as a biological mechanism. We applied a recently developed mediation analysis technique to a data sample of 6550 mother-child pairs, and we compared the estimated coefficients across nested probability models. We found that maternal body mass index (BMI) (in kg/m2), a widely used measure of weight status, reduces the odds of delivering a low birth weight infant, and this mechanism explains about 10.2% of the adverse impact of maternal smoking on having a low birth weight child. Moreover, when categorizing maternal pre-pregnancy BMI into four weight statuses (i.e., underweight, normal weight, overweight, and obese), we found that, in contrast to mothers with normal weight status, underweight mothers are 70% more likely to have a low birth weight child. Our findings suggest that maternal weight status plays a role in understanding how maternal smoking affects low birth weight outcome, indicating that maintaining a proper weight status for women who plan to give birth may be a possible policy to promote infant health.
Bibliography Citation
Zhang, Weihui and Tse-Chuan Yang. "Maternal Smoking and Infant Low Birth Weight: Exploring the Biological Mechanism Through the Mother's Pre-pregnancy Weight Status." Population Research and Policy Review published online (12 October 2019): DOI: 10.1007/s11113-019-09554-x.