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Author: Wraw, Christina
Resulting in 4 citations.
1. Wraw, Christina
Deary, Ian J.
Der, Geoff
Gale, Catharine R.
Intelligence in Youth and Mental Health at Age 50
Intelligence 58 (September-October 2016): 69-79.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0160289616300356
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Depression (see also CESD); Health, Mental; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Intelligence; Sleep; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Background: Few cognitive epidemiology studies on mental health have focused on the links between pre-morbid intelligence and self-reports of common mental disorders, such as depression, sleep difficulties, and mental health status. The current study examines these associations in 50-year-old adults.

Methods: The study uses data from the 5793 participants in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 cohort (NLSY-79) who responded to questions on mental health at age 50 and had IQ measured with the Armed Forces Qualification Test (AFQT) when they were aged between 15 and 23 years in 1980. Mental health outcomes were: life-time diagnosis of depression; the mental component score of the 12-item short-form Health Survey (SF-12); the 7-item Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D); and a summary measure of sleep difficulty.

Bibliography Citation
Wraw, Christina, Ian J. Deary, Geoff Der and Catharine R. Gale. "Intelligence in Youth and Mental Health at Age 50." Intelligence 58 (September-October 2016): 69-79.
2. Wraw, Christina
Deary, Ian J.
Der, Geoff
Gale, Catharine R.
Maternal and Offspring Intelligence in Relation to BMI across Childhood and Adolescence
International Journal of Obesity 42 (2018): 1610-1620.
Also: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41366-018-0009-1
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Nature Publishing Group
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Body Mass Index (BMI); Children; I.Q.; Mothers; Obesity; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Objective: The present study tested the association between both mothers' and offspring's intelligence and offspring's body mass index (BMI) in youth.

Method: Participants were members of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY-79) Children and Young Adults cohort (n = 11,512) and their biological mothers who were members of the NLSY-79 (n = 4932). Offspring's IQ was measured with the Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT). Mothers' IQ was measured with the Armed Forces Qualification Test (AFQT). A series of regression analyses tested the association between IQ and offspring's BMI by age group, while adjusting for pre-pregnancy BMI and family SES. The analyses were stratified by sex and ethnicity (non-Black and non-Hispanic, Black, and Hispanic).

Bibliography Citation
Wraw, Christina, Ian J. Deary, Geoff Der and Catharine R. Gale. "Maternal and Offspring Intelligence in Relation to BMI across Childhood and Adolescence." International Journal of Obesity 42 (2018): 1610-1620.
3. Wraw, Christina
Deary, Ian J.
Gale, Catharine R.
Der, Geoff
Intelligence in Youth and Health at Age 50
Intelligence 53 (November-December 2015): 23-32.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0160289615001014
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Health, Chronic Conditions; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Intelligence

Background: The link between intelligence in youth and all-cause mortality in later-life is well established. To better understand this relationship, the current study examines the links between pre-morbid intelligence and a number of specific health outcomes at age 50 using the NLSY-1979 cohort.

Methods: Participants were the 5793 participants in the NLSY-79 who responded to questions about health outcomes at age 50. Sixteen health outcomes were examined: two were summary measures (physical health and functional limitation), 9 were diagnosed illness conditions, 4 were self-reported conditions, and one was a measure of general health status. Linear and logistic regressions were used, as appropriate, to examine the relationship between intelligence in youth and the health outcomes. Age, sex and both childhood and adult SES, and its sub-components – income, education, & occupational prestige – are all adjusted for separately.

Bibliography Citation
Wraw, Christina, Ian J. Deary, Catharine R. Gale and Geoff Der. "Intelligence in Youth and Health at Age 50." Intelligence 53 (November-December 2015): 23-32.
4. Wraw, Christina
Der, Geoff
Gale, Catharine R.
Deary, Ian J.
Intelligence in Youth and Health Behaviours in Middle Age
Intelligence 69 (July-August 2018): 71-86.
Also: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0160289617302672
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Exercise; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Intelligence; Nutritional Status/Nutrition/Consumption Behaviors; Smoking (see Cigarette Use)

Objective: We investigated the association between intelligence in youth and a range of health-related behaviours in middle age.

Method: Participants were the 5347 men and women who responded to the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY-79) 2012 survey. IQ was recorded with the Armed Forces Qualification Test (AFQT) when participants were aged 15 to 23 years of age. Self-reports on exercise (moderate activity, vigorous activity, and strength training), dietary, smoking, drinking, and oral health behaviours were recorded when participants were in middle age (mean age = 51.7 years). A series of regression analyses tested for an association between IQ in youth and the different health related behaviours in middle age, while adjusting for childhood socio-economic status (SES) and adult SES.

Conclusion: In the present study, a higher IQ in adolescence was associated with a number of healthier behaviours in middle age. In contrast to these results, a few associations were also identified between higher intelligence and behaviours that may or may not be linked with poor health (i.e. skipping meals and snacking between meals) and with behaviours that are known to be linked with poor health (i.e. drinking alcohol and the number of cigarettes smoked). To explore mechanisms of association, future studies could test for a range of health behaviours as potential mediators between IQ and morbidity or mortality in later life.

Bibliography Citation
Wraw, Christina, Geoff Der, Catharine R. Gale and Ian J. Deary. "Intelligence in Youth and Health Behaviours in Middle Age." Intelligence 69 (July-August 2018): 71-86.