Search Results

Author: Wilson, John
Resulting in 5 citations.
1. Rotolo, Thomas
Wilson, John
Effects of Children and Employment Status on the Volunteer Work of American Women
Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly 36,3 (September 2007): 487-503
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Child Care; Children; Discrimination; Economics of Gender; Employment; Fertility; Housework/Housewives; Volunteer Work

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Competing demands from work and family make it difficult for women to do volunteer work. An analysis of data from the Young Women's Cohort of the National Longitudinal Survey (1978-1991) shows that homemakers are more likely to volunteer than are fulltime workers, followed by part-time workers. Mothers of school-age children are the most likely to volunteer, followed by childless women and mothers of young children. Mothers of school-age children are even more likely to volunteer if they are homemakers, and mothers of pre-school children are even less likely to volunteer if they work fulltime.
Bibliography Citation
Rotolo, Thomas and John Wilson. "Effects of Children and Employment Status on the Volunteer Work of American Women." Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly 36,3 (September 2007): 487-503.
2. Rotolo, Thomas
Wilson, John
What Happened to the "Long Civic Generation"? Explaining Cohort Differences in Volunteerism
Social Forces 82,3 (March 2004): 1091-1121.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3598367
Cohort(s): Mature Women, Young Women
Publisher: University of North Carolina Press
Keyword(s): Volunteer Work; Women's Roles

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

In Bowling Alone Robert Putnam argues that the passing of the "long civic generation," whose values were molded by the Depression and the Second World War, has resulted in a decline in civic engagement. In this analysis we test the generation hypothesis by comparing the volunteer behavior of two successive generations of women at the same age. No support for Putnam's thesis is found. Once appropriate controls for sociodemographic trends are imposed, generation differences disappear. However, there are cohort differences in the type of volunteer work performed.
Bibliography Citation
Rotolo, Thomas and John Wilson. "What Happened to the "Long Civic Generation"? Explaining Cohort Differences in Volunteerism." Social Forces 82,3 (March 2004): 1091-1121.
3. Wilson, John
Musick, Marc
Doing Well by Doing Good: Volunteering and Occupational Achievement Among American Women
Sociological Quarterly 44,3 (Summer 2003) :433-450.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1533-8525.2003.tb00540.x/abstract
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Life Course; Occupational Attainment; Volunteer Work

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

In this article, the researchers build on an earlier body of research to verify any truth behind the assumption that volunteer work helps people get good jobs. A survey of related literature regarding volunteering and employment is presented. The analytical design of the research is discussed. The researchers use the National Longitudinal Survey of the Labor Market Experience of Young Women which provides the data to be applied for the theory. The young women in the experiment exhibit a fairly conventional life-course trajectory as they move from early adulthood to the middle ages. The social mechanisms linking voluntarism and employment is discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Wilson, John and Marc Musick. "Doing Well by Doing Good: Volunteering and Occupational Achievement Among American Women." Sociological Quarterly 44,3 (Summer 2003) :433-450.
4. Wilson, John
Musick, Marc
Women's Labor Force Participation And Volunteer Work
Working Paper, The Aspen Institute, Non-profit Sector Research Fund, 2000.
Also: http://www.nonprofitresearch.org/newsletter1531/newsletter_show.htm?doc_id=17385
Cohort(s): Mature Women, Young Women
Publisher: Aspen Institute
Keyword(s): Volunteer Work

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

As women entered the workforce in greater numbers, there was an unsubstantiated fear that women's access to paid labor would diminish the supply of volunteer labor. However, this study reveals that such fears are unfounded, although work and volunteering affect each other both negatively and positively. Overall, women who volunteer find greater success in the workplace. The researchers considered data from the National Longitudinal Surveys of Labor Market Experience, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Labor, managed by the Center for Human Resource Research at Ohio State University, and conducted by the U.S. Bureau of Census. This survey was conducted to be representative of all Americans born during a given time period. Information about volunteering was gathered from mature women in 1974, 1976, 1979, 1981, and 1984. Data on volunteering were gathered from young women in 1973, 1978, 1988, and 1991.
Bibliography Citation
Wilson, John and Marc Musick. "Women's Labor Force Participation And Volunteer Work." Working Paper, The Aspen Institute, Non-profit Sector Research Fund, 2000.
5. Wilson, John
Mustillo, Sarah
Intergenerational Transmission of Volunteering: Evidence from the National Longitudinal Survey
Presented: New Orleans, LA, Southern Sociological Society Annual Meeting, April 2000
Cohort(s): Mature Women, Young Women
Publisher: Southern Sociological Society
Keyword(s): Human Capital; Modeling; Mothers and Daughters; Pairs (also see Siblings); Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness; Role Models; Volunteer Work

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The popular resource model, which accounts for much of the variance in volunteering by citing differences in human & social capital, is argued to be deficient insofar as it ignores the possibility that volunteering is passed from one generation to another. Data from the National Longitudinal Survey make possible an examination of the extent to which mothers transmit volunteer behavior to their daughters, net of any resources they might also bestow. From the Young & the Mature Women\'s Module, a \"matching-pairs\" data set is created in which 1,816 mothers & daughters from the same household were interviewed (the former, 5 times over 10 years & the latter, 4 times over 18 years). Results indicate that a powerful reason why daughters volunteer, net of their own resources, is that they have mothers who acted as role models in this regard. The reasons daughters give for volunteering, however, do not correspond closely to the reasons their mothers give. Various models examining factors that might moderate the tendency for daughters to emulate the philanthropy of their mothers are estimated.
Bibliography Citation
Wilson, John and Sarah Mustillo. "Intergenerational Transmission of Volunteering: Evidence from the National Longitudinal Survey." Presented: New Orleans, LA, Southern Sociological Society Annual Meeting, April 2000.