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Author: Wang, Xuanwen
Resulting in 6 citations.
1. Dong, Xiuwen Sue
Wang, Xuanwen
Largay, Julie
Health Behaviors and Health Outcomes among Construction Workers in the United States, a Longitudinal Study
Presented: New Orleans LA, American Public Health Association Annual Meeting and Expo, November 2014
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Public Health Association
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Blue-Collar Jobs; Drug Use; Health, Chronic Conditions; Health, Mental; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Industrial Classification; Physical Activity (see also Exercise); Smoking (see Cigarette Use); Substance Use

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Methods: Data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1979 cohort (1979-2010), were used. Construction workers (n=1,409) were defined as those who were employed in construction for at least three years between 1979 and 2010. Health behaviors in the follow-up period were measured by a risky behavior index (RBI), including diet plans, physical exercise, and the use of tobacco, alcohol, marijuana, and cocaine. Health outcomes were measured by self-reported physical and mental health and doctor-diagnosed chronic conditions at the age of 40.

Results: Initial findings show that the construction cohort gained weight during the three decades of follow-up; the percentage of obese workers increased from 3.9% to 31.8%. Almost all workers in this cohort were involved in risky behaviors when they were teenagers. However, smoking tobacco and drinking heavily declined significantly in middle age. The RBI was strongly correlated with both physical and mental health. Among those with an RBI less than five, 82% reported their health was excellent or very good at age 40, compared to 56% for those with an RBI greater than 10. Similar patterns were found in mental health and chronic conditions.

Bibliography Citation
Dong, Xiuwen Sue, Xuanwen Wang and Julie Largay. "Health Behaviors and Health Outcomes among Construction Workers in the United States, a Longitudinal Study." Presented: New Orleans LA, American Public Health Association Annual Meeting and Expo, November 2014.
2. Dong, Xiuwen Sue
Wang, Xuanwen
Largay, Julie
Job Exposures, Health Behaviours, and Work-related Injuries among young Construction Workers in the United States: a 12-year Follow-up Study
Occupational and Environmental Medicine 71,S1 (June 2014): A43-A44.
Also: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25018360
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: BMJ Publishing Group, Ltd. - British Medical Journal Publishing Group
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Blue-Collar Jobs; Body Mass Index (BMI); Industrial Classification; Injuries, Workplace; Obesity; Occupations; Smoking (see Cigarette Use); Substance Use; Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

OBJECTIVES: Young construction workers are at increased risk for occupational injuries. This study aimed to identify factors associated with work-related injuries within this worker group in order to provide insight for injury interventions. METHOD: Data from nine waves (1988-2000) of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1979 cohort (NLSY79, N=12 686), were studied. Construction workers included those who worked in the construction industry for at least one wave. Job exposures were measured by frequency and types of physical efforts, number of waves worked in blue-collar jobs, and hours worked per week. Health behaviours were composed of body mass index, and dose of tobacco, alcohol, marijuana, and cocaine use. Multivariate logistic regression was employed to estimate the association between selected factors and work-related injuries after controlling for possible confounders.

RESULTS: During the 12-year follow-up period, 47% of the construction cohort experienced work-related injuries compared to 29% for their non-construction counterparts. The logistic regression results indicated that both job exposures and personal behaviours were associated with work-related injuries: blue-collar occupations (OR =4.24, 95% CI: 2.54-7.07); physical efforts (OR = 1.72, 95% CI: 1.20-2.48); worked over 50 h per week (OR = 1.91, 95% CI: 1.11-3.28); rotating/split shift (OR=2.99, 95% CI: 1.25-7.16); obesity (OR = 1.58, 95% CI: 1.04-2.41); and cocaine use on more than 10 occasions (OR=1.98, 95% CI: 1.31-2.99).

CONCLUSIONS: The results demonstrated that construction interventions should be developed to address preventable risk factors. Young construction workers could benefit not only from enhanced work-place injury preventions, but also health behaviour interventions.

©2014, Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

Bibliography Citation
Dong, Xiuwen Sue, Xuanwen Wang and Julie Largay. "Job Exposures, Health Behaviours, and Work-related Injuries among young Construction Workers in the United States: a 12-year Follow-up Study." Occupational and Environmental Medicine 71,S1 (June 2014): A43-A44.
3. Dong, Xiuwen Sue
Wang, Xuanwen
Largay, Julie
Occupational and Non-occupational Factors Associated with Work-related Injuries among Construction Workers in the USA
International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Health 21,2 (March 2015): 142-150.
Also: http://www.maneyonline.com/doi/abs/10.1179/2049396714Y.0000000107
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Maney Publishing
Keyword(s): Blue-Collar Jobs; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Injuries, Workplace; Occupations; Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Background: Many factors contribute to occupational injuries. However, these factors have been compartmentalized and isolated in most studies.

Objective: To examine the relationship between work-related injuries and multiple occupational and non-occupational factors among construction workers in the USA.

Methods: Data from the 1988-2000 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1979 cohort (N=12,686) were analyzed. Job exposures and health behaviors were examined and used as independent variables in four multivariate logistic regression models to identify associations with occupational injuries.

Results: After controlling for demographic variables, occupational injuries were 18% (95% CI: 1.04-1.34) more likely in construction than in non-construction. Blue-collar occupations, job physical efforts, multiple jobs, and long working hours accounted for the escalated risk in construction. Smoking, obesity/overweight, and cocaine use significantly increased the risk of work-related injury when demographics and occupational factors were held constant.

Conclusions: Workplace injuries are better explained by simultaneously examining occupational and non-occupational characteristics

Bibliography Citation
Dong, Xiuwen Sue, Xuanwen Wang and Julie Largay. "Occupational and Non-occupational Factors Associated with Work-related Injuries among Construction Workers in the USA ." International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Health 21,2 (March 2015): 142-150.
4. Dong, Xiuwen Sue
Wang, Xuanwen
Largay, Julie
Work-Related Injuries and Workers Compensation among Construction Workers, a Longitudinal Study
Presented: New Orleans LA, American Public Health Association Annual Meeting and Expo, November 2014
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Public Health Association
Keyword(s): Blue-Collar Jobs; Industrial Classification; Injuries, Workplace; Labor Force Participation; Wages

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1979 cohort were used. Construction workers (n=2,034) were defined as those who were employed in construction at least one wave between 1988 and 2000. Work-related injuries and workers compensation claims were self-reported. The consequences of work-related injuries, such as lost wages, working less than full-time, being laid-off or fired, and others were also considered.
Bibliography Citation
Dong, Xiuwen Sue, Xuanwen Wang and Julie Largay. "Work-Related Injuries and Workers Compensation among Construction Workers, a Longitudinal Study." Presented: New Orleans LA, American Public Health Association Annual Meeting and Expo, November 2014.
5. Dong, Xiuwen Sue
Wang, Xuanwen
Largay, Julie
Sokas, Rosemary
Economic Consequences of Workplace Injuries in the United States: Findings from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79)
American Journal of Industrial Medicine, 59,2 (February 2016): 106-118.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ajim.22559/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Income; Income Dynamics/Shocks; Injuries, Workplace; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Wage Growth

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Background: This study explored economic consequences of work-related injuries using a longitudinal data source.

Methods: Data were from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1979 cohort (n = 12,686). Short-term consequences were measured when the injury was reported. "Difference-in-differences" approach was applied to estimate income and wealth disparities between injured and non-injured workers before and after injury. Fixed effects models were used to identify variations over time.

Results: The annual earnings growth was $3,715 (in 2000 dollars) less for workers with DAFW injury and $1,152 less for workers with NDAFW injury compared to non-injured workers during a 10-year follow-up. Lost wages and disability following injury contributed to income loss for injured workers, but the loss was moderated by union membership. After controlling for confounders, income disparities persisted, but family wealth differences did not.

Conclusions: Occupational injuries exacerbate income inequality. Efforts to reduce such disparities should include workplace safety and health enforcement.

© 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Bibliography Citation
Dong, Xiuwen Sue, Xuanwen Wang, Julie Largay and Rosemary Sokas. "Economic Consequences of Workplace Injuries in the United States: Findings from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79)." American Journal of Industrial Medicine, 59,2 (February 2016): 106-118.
6. Dong, Xiuwen Sue
Wang, Xuanwen
Largay, Julie
Sokas, Rosemary
Long-term Health Outcomes of Work-related Injuries among Construction Workers--Findings from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth
American Journal of Industrial Medicine 58,3 (March 2015): 308-318.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ajim.22415/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Blue-Collar Jobs; Health, Mental; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Injuries, Workplace; Occupations

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Background: This study examined the relationship between work-related injuries and health outcomes among a cohort of blue-collar construction workers.

Materials and Methods: Data were from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1979 cohort (NLSY79; n = 12,686). A range of health outcomes among blue-collar construction workers (n = 1,435) were measured when they turned age 40 (1998–2006) and stratified by these workers' prior work-related injury status between 1988 and 2000. Univariate and multivariate analyses were conducted to measure differences among subgroups.

Results: About 38% of the construction cohort reported injuries resulting in days away from work (DAFW); another 15% were injured but reported no DAFW (NDAFW). At age 40, an average of 10 years after injury, those with DAFW injury had worse self-reported general health and mental health, and more diagnosed conditions and functional limitations than those without injury. This difference was statistically significant after controlling for major demographics.

Discussion: Adverse health effects from occupational injury among construction workers persist longer than previously documented.

© 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Bibliography Citation
Dong, Xiuwen Sue, Xuanwen Wang, Julie Largay and Rosemary Sokas. "Long-term Health Outcomes of Work-related Injuries among Construction Workers--Findings from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth." American Journal of Industrial Medicine 58,3 (March 2015): 308-318.