Search Results

Author: Waldron, Mary
Resulting in 4 citations.
1. Doran, Kelly A.
Waldron, Mary
Timing of First Alcohol Use and First Sex in Male and Female Adolescents
Journal of Adolescent Health 61,5 (November 2017): 606-611.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1054139X17302185
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Adolescent Sexual Activity; Age at First Intercourse; Alcohol Use; Modeling, Hazard/Event History/Survival/Duration

Purpose: We examined associations between timing of first alcohol use and first sexual intercourse in adolescent males and potential differences in observed associations between males and females.

Methods: Data were drawn from 4,079 male and 4,059 female participants of the National Longitudinal Study of Youth 1997, aged 12-16 years at the first assessment. Cox proportional hazards regression models were estimated predicting age at first sexual intercourse from age at first alcohol use, without and with adjustment for correlated sociodemographic and individual- and family-level risk factors. Analyses were conducted separately for males and females, with interactions between alcohol use and respondent sex (female vs. male) modeled in subsidiary analyses.

Results: Onset of first drink was strongly predictive of earlier sexual intercourse for both males and females, with effects of drinking most pronounced for females during early adolescence.

Bibliography Citation
Doran, Kelly A. and Mary Waldron. "Timing of First Alcohol Use and First Sex in Male and Female Adolescents." Journal of Adolescent Health 61,5 (November 2017): 606-611.
2. Duckworth, Jennifer C.
Doran, Kelly A.
Waldron, Mary
Childhood Weight Status and Timing of First Substance Use in an Ethnically Diverse Sample
Drug and Alcohol Dependence 164 (1 July 2016): 172-178.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0376871616301119
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Body Mass Index (BMI); Child Growth; Child Health; Cigarette Use (see Smoking); Drug Use; Ethnic Differences; Gender Differences; Modeling, Hazard/Event History/Survival/Duration; Racial Differences; Substance Use; Weight

Background: We examined associations between weight status during childhood and timing of first cigarette, alcohol, and marijuana use in an ethnically diverse sample.

Methods: Data were drawn from child respondents of the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, including 1,448 Hispanic, 2,126 non-Hispanic Black, and 3,304 non-Hispanic, non-Black (White) respondents aged 10 years and older as of last assessment. Cox proportional hazards regression was conducted predicting age at first use from weight status (obese, overweight, and underweight relative to healthy weight) assessed at ages 7/8, separately by substance class, sex, and race/ethnicity. Tests of interactions between weight status and respondent sex and race/ethnicity were also conducted.

Results: Compared to healthy-weight females of the same race/ethnicity, overweight Hispanic females were at increased likelihood of alcohol and marijuana use and overweight White females were at increased likelihood of cigarette and marijuana use. Compared to healthy-weight males of the same race/ethnicity, obese White males were at decreased likelihood of cigarette and alcohol use and underweight Hispanic and Black males were at decreased likelihood of alcohol and marijuana use. Significant differences in associations by sex and race/ethnicity were observed in tests of interactions.

Conclusions: Findings highlight childhood weight status as a predictor of timing of first substance use among Hispanic and Non-Hispanic Black and White female and male youth. Results suggest that collapsing across sex and race/ethnicity, a common practice in prior research, may obscure important within-group patterns of associations and thus may be of limited utility for informing preventive and early intervention efforts.

Bibliography Citation
Duckworth, Jennifer C., Kelly A. Doran and Mary Waldron. "Childhood Weight Status and Timing of First Substance Use in an Ethnically Diverse Sample." Drug and Alcohol Dependence 164 (1 July 2016): 172-178.
3. Emery, Robert E.
Waldron, Mary
Kitzmann, Katherine M.
Aaron, Jeffrey
Delinquent Behavior, Future Divorce or Nonmarital Childbearing, and Externalizing Behavior Among Offspring: A 14-Year Prospective Study
Journal of Family Psychology 13,4 (December 1999): 568-579.
Also: http://psycnet.apa.org/journals/fam/13/4/568/
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: American Psychological Association (APA)
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Behavioral Problems; Childbearing; Children, Behavioral Development; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Divorce; Family Income; Family Studies; Marital Status; Mothers, Behavior; Parents, Single; Poverty; Racial Differences

In a longitudinal study of a national sample, more externalizing behavior problems were found among 222 children from never-married and 142 children from divorced families than among 840 children from married families. However, delinquent behavior reported when future mothers were single, childless adolescents prospectively predicted their future marital status and behavior problems among their offspring 14 years later. Maternal history of delinquent behavior accounted for much, but not all, of the relationship between marital status and children's externalizing behavior. Divorce and nonmarital childbirth do not occur at random, and these findings demonstrate that marital status is predicted by individual characteristics as well as by demographic factors. These findings highlight the importance of cautiously interpreting the much-discussed correlation between marital status and children's behavior problems. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved)
Bibliography Citation
Emery, Robert E., Mary Waldron, Katherine M. Kitzmann and Jeffrey Aaron. "Delinquent Behavior, Future Divorce or Nonmarital Childbearing, and Externalizing Behavior Among Offspring: A 14-Year Prospective Study." Journal of Family Psychology 13,4 (December 1999): 568-579.
4. Sapharas, Nicole K.
Estell, David B.
Doran, Kelly A.
Waldron, Mary
Effects of Parental Divorce or a Father's Death on High School Completion
Psychology in the Schools 53,8 (September 2016): 861-874.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/pits.21947/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Childhood Adversity/Trauma; Divorce; Fathers, Absence; High School Completion/Graduates; Parental Influences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Associations between parental loss and high school (HS) completion were examined in data drawn from 1,761 male and 1,689 female offspring born in wedlock to mothers participating in a nationally representative study. Multiple logistic regression models were conducted predicting HS completion by age 19 among offspring whose parents divorced or father died, compared to offspring of continuously married parents. Models were estimated without and with adjustment for correlated sociodemographic characteristics, including maternal education and age at first childbirth and offspring age at last assessment and race/ethnicity. In unadjusted models, parental divorce predicted a 41% decreased odds of HS completion for males, and paternal death predicted a 79% decreased odds of HS completion for females. In models including sociodemographic risk factors, associations between parental divorce and paternal death reduced slightly. Findings highlight the importance of examining unique risks from paternal death versus parental divorce on educational attainment in male and female offspring.
Bibliography Citation
Sapharas, Nicole K., David B. Estell, Kelly A. Doran and Mary Waldron. "Effects of Parental Divorce or a Father's Death on High School Completion." Psychology in the Schools 53,8 (September 2016): 861-874.