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Author: Sugie, Naomi
Resulting in 4 citations.
1. Gottlieb, Aaron
Sugie, Naomi
Marriage, Cohabitation and Criminal Offending among Young Adults
Presented: New Orleans LA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2013
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Cohabitation; Crime; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Drug Use; Family Structure; Marriage

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Over the last 40 years, one of the most pronounced changes in the family is the increase in cohabitation and reduction in marriage. Despite the changing trends in the family, contemporary criminological theories have rarely considered the role of cohabitation in offending, continuing to emphasize the protective role of marriage. In this paper, we use data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 to examine the relationship between marriage, cohabitation, and offending among a sample of young adult men and women. We find that cohabitation protects against deviant behavior, although to a lesser degree than marriage. Partner characteristics appear to mediate the association for both marriage and cohabitation; partnership characteristics, on the other hand, appear to mediate the association for cohabitation to a much greater degree than for marriage.
Bibliography Citation
Gottlieb, Aaron and Naomi Sugie. "Marriage, Cohabitation and Criminal Offending among Young Adults." Presented: New Orleans LA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2013.
2. Gottlieb, Aaron
Sugie, Naomi
Marriage, Cohabitation, and Crime: Differentiating Associations by Partnership Stage
Justice Quarterly published online (11 April 2018): DOI: 10.1080/07418825.2018.1445275.
Also: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/07418825.2018.1445275
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences
Keyword(s): Cohabitation; Crime; Marital Status; Marriage

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

A wealth of scholarship generally finds that marriage protects against crime, but there is less consistent evidence for cohabitation. In this article, we contribute to scholarship on marriage and put forward new evidence about cohabitation by examining marital and cohabiting partnerships as transitions with distinct stages of entry, stability, and dissolution. We use within-person change models with contemporary data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 to analyze these stages for the full sample and separately for men and women. The findings show differential protective associations of marriage and cohabitation depending on the stage of the partnership. Both recently formed cohabiting partnerships and stable cohabiting partnerships are associated with reductions in the level of offending, although to a lesser degree than marital relationships. Cohabiting partnerships that are stable, in that they have lasted at least a year, are associated with larger decreases in offending, particularly among women.
Bibliography Citation
Gottlieb, Aaron and Naomi Sugie. "Marriage, Cohabitation, and Crime: Differentiating Associations by Partnership Stage." Justice Quarterly published online (11 April 2018): DOI: 10.1080/07418825.2018.1445275.
3. Sugie, Naomi
Beyond Incarceration: The Consequences of Criminal Justice Contact for Mental Health
Presented: Seattle WA, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2016
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Criminal Justice System; Health, Mental; Incarceration/Jail; Modeling, Fixed Effects

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

A growing literature documents the deleterious consequences of incarceration for mental health. Although salient, incarceration is only one form of custodial citizenship in the United States and, accordingly, considering only incarceration may mask the extent to which the criminal justice system is associated with poor mental health. In this paper, we use the stress process paradigm, along with nationally representative survey data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 (NLSY97), to examine the relationship between criminal justice contact--defined as arrest, conviction, and incarceration--and mental health. First, we find that arrest and conviction are more commonly experienced than incarceration and that, similar to incarceration, arrest and conviction are concentrated among race/ethnic minority and economically disadvantaged individuals. Second, results from fixed-effects models, which adjust for stable characteristics of respondents, document that arrest, conviction, and incarceration have similar deleterious consequences for mental health. Third, we find that the association between criminal justice contact and mental health is concentrated among those who resided in highly disadvantaged neighborhoods during adolescence. Taken together, these results suggest that the consequences of criminal justice system contact for mental health have been vastly underestimated.
Bibliography Citation
Sugie, Naomi. "Beyond Incarceration: The Consequences of Criminal Justice Contact for Mental Health." Presented: Seattle WA, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2016.
4. Sugie, Naomi
Turney, Kristin
Beyond Incarceration: Criminal Justice Contact and Mental Health
American Sociological Review 82,4 (August 2017): 719-743.
Also: http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0003122417713188
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Arrests; Criminal Justice System; Disadvantaged, Economically; Geocoded Data; Health, Mental; Incarceration/Jail; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Racial Differences; Racial Equality/Inequality

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

A growing literature documents deleterious consequences of incarceration for mental health. Although salient, incarceration is only one form of criminal justice contact and, accordingly, focusing on incarceration may mask the extent to which the criminal justice system influences mental health. Using insights from the stress process paradigm, along with nationally representative data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997, we examine criminal justice contact--defined as arrest, conviction, and incarceration--and mental health. First, fixed-effects models, which adjust for stable unobserved and time-varying observed characteristics, show that arrest is deleteriously associated with mental health, and arrest accounts for nearly half of the association between incarceration and poor mental health, although certain types of incarceration appear more consequential than others. Second, the associations are similar across race and ethnicity; this, combined with racial/ethnic disparities in contact, indicates that criminal justice interactions exacerbate minority health inequalities. Third, the associations between criminal justice contact, especially arrest and incarceration, and mental health are particularly large among respondents residing in contextually disadvantaged areas during adolescence. Taken together, the results suggest that the consequences of criminal justice contact for mental health have a far greater reach than previously considered.
Bibliography Citation
Sugie, Naomi and Kristin Turney. "Beyond Incarceration: Criminal Justice Contact and Mental Health." American Sociological Review 82,4 (August 2017): 719-743.