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Author: Solomon, Keisha T.
Resulting in 3 citations.
1. Dasgupta, Kabir
Solomon, Keisha T.
Family Size Effects on Childhood Obesity: Evidence on the Quantity-Quality Trade-off Using the NLSY
Economics and Human Biology 29 (May 2018): 42-55.
Also: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1570677X17301077
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Child Health; Family Size; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Modeling, Instrumental Variables; Obesity; Parental Influences; Siblings

In this study, we use matched mother-child data from the National Longitudinal Surveys to study the effects of family size on child health. Focusing on excess body weight indicators as children's health outcome of interest, we examine the effects of exogenous variations in family size generated by twin births and parental preference for mixed sex composition of their children. We find no significant empirical support in favor of the quantity-quality trade-off theory in instrumental variable regression analysis. This result is further substantiated when we make use of the panel aspects of the data to study child health outcomes of arrival of younger siblings at later parities. Specifically, when we employ child fixed effects analysis, results suggest that birth of a younger sibling is related to a decline in the likelihood of being overweight by 4 percentage points and a drop in the probability of illness by approximately 5 percentage points.
Bibliography Citation
Dasgupta, Kabir and Keisha T. Solomon. "Family Size Effects on Childhood Obesity: Evidence on the Quantity-Quality Trade-off Using the NLSY." Economics and Human Biology 29 (May 2018): 42-55.
2. Solomon, Keisha T.
Mental Illness and College Educational Outcomes: Evidence from State Equal Coverage Laws
Presented: Washington DC, Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management (APPAM) Annual Fall Research Conference, November 2018
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management (APPAM)
Keyword(s): Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS); College Education; Dropouts; Educational Outcomes; Geocoded Data; Grade Point Average (GPA)/Grades; Health, Mental; State-Level Data/Policy

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Previous research has established that state mental illness parity laws improve access to mental healthcare and, in turn, reduce mental illness. I extend this literature in two important ways. First, I study the effect of the state mental illness parity law implementation on mental illness among college-age individuals. Second, I examine the effect of state mental illness parity laws on human capital accumulation. Considering spill-overs to these educational outcomes is important as previous research shows that mental illness impedes college performance. Hence, reduced mental illness through state parity laws could have positive spill-over effects to educational outcomes that have not yet been documented.

I use differences-in-differences models to uncover the causal effects of state mental illness parity laws on mental illness and educational outcomes. I leverage plausibly exogenous variation in insurance coverage for mental healthcare using changes in state laws over the period 1998 to 2008. First, to study parity law effects on mental illness I utilize administrative data on completed suicides from National Vital Statistics System and survey data on reported mental illness from Behavioral Risk Factor System. Second, I use longitudinal data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 Cohort to study the effects of the mental illness parity law on two important educational outcomes: drop out decisions and grade point average (GPA).

Bibliography Citation
Solomon, Keisha T. "Mental Illness and College Educational Outcomes: Evidence from State Equal Coverage Laws." Presented: Washington DC, Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management (APPAM) Annual Fall Research Conference, November 2018.
3. Solomon, Keisha T.
Three Essays on Health Economics
Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Economics, Temple University, 2019
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: ProQuest Dissertations & Theses (PQDT)
Keyword(s): Achievement; Child Health; Childbearing, Premarital/Nonmarital; Children, Academic Development; College Dropouts; Educational Outcomes; Family Size; Geocoded Data; Health, Mental; Siblings; State-Level Data/Policy

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

My dissertation covers three loosely related topics in health and education economics that focus on examining factors that may affect children's and young adults' health capital and human capital accumulation. The first essay examines the effect of state-level full parity mental illness law implementation on mental illness among college-aged individuals and human capital accumulation in college. It is important to consider spill-overs to these educational outcomes, as previous research shows that mental illness impedes college performance. I utilize administrative data on completed suicides and grade point average, and survey data on reported mental illness days and decision to drop-out of college between 1998 and 2008 in differences-in-differences (DD) analysis to uncover causal effects of state-level parity laws. Following the passage of a state-level full parity law, I find that the suicide rate reduces, the propensity to report any poor mental health day reduces, college GPA increases, and the propensity to drop out of college does not change.

The second essay investigates the effects of family size on child health. This essay is a joint study with Kabir Dasgupta. In this study, we use matched mother-child data from the National Longitudinal Surveys to study the effects of family size on child health. Focusing on excess body weight indicators as children's health outcome of interest, we examine the effects of exogenous variations in family size generated by twin births and parental preference for mixed sex composition of their children. We find no significant empirical support in favor of the quantity-quality trade-off theory in instrumental variable regression analysis. This result is further substantiated when we make use of the panel aspects of the data to study child health outcomes of arrival of younger siblings at later parities.

The third essay estimates the causal effect of being born out of wedlock on a child's health outcome and early academic achievements. Specifically, the study uses rich panel data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY79) and the Children of the NLSY79 (NLSY79-child), coupled with a sibling fixed-effects model to address omitted variable bias attributable to unobserved family characteristics.

Bibliography Citation
Solomon, Keisha T. Three Essays on Health Economics. Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Economics, Temple University, 2019.