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Author: Slade, Eric Phillip
Resulting in 4 citations.
1. Slade, Eric Phillip
An Analysis of the Consequences of Employer Linked Health Insurance Coverage in the U. S.
NLS Discussion Paper No. 96-33, Washington DC: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, December 1995.
Also: http://stats.bls.gov/ore/abstract/nl/nl950100.htm
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Benefits, Insurance; Employment; Health Care; Mobility, Job; Modeling

This paper analyzes the arguments and evidence presented in existing job-lock studies, and offers new evidence regarding the effect of health insurance coverage on job mobility. It begins with a lengthy critique of existing studies. The second part of the paper presents a new model of job changes and health insurance coverage. The final section reports the results of an empirical analysis based on data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY).
Bibliography Citation
Slade, Eric Phillip. "An Analysis of the Consequences of Employer Linked Health Insurance Coverage in the U. S." NLS Discussion Paper No. 96-33, Washington DC: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, December 1995.
2. Slade, Eric Phillip
An Economic Analysis of Employer Related Health Insurance Coverage and Job Mobility in The United States
Ph.D. Dissertation, Brown University, 1997
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: UMI - University Microfilms, Bell and Howell Information and Learning
Keyword(s): Benefits, Insurance; Health Care; Health Reform; Industrial Relations; Labor Economics; Mobility, Job

This dissertation investigates the relationship between access to employer related health insurance coverage and transitions out of existing jobs or into new jobs. That relationship has recently become an important topic for investigation as policy makers consider major reforms to the current system of health insurance coverage distribution in the U.S. Previous authors have pointed to the deterrent to job mobility created by preexisting conditions exclusions in health insurance policies as an important reason for reform, but give no guidance as to whether nationalized insurance would be more or less preferable to alternative piecemeal reforms to the current system, such as a prohibition on preexisting condition exclusions. This dissertation advances previous research in this area by formalizing a model which illustrates the interdependencies between job changes and access to health insurance coverage. Within this framework I examine the implications of alternative reforms for access to health insurance coverage and job mobility. In the analysis the decision to leave a current job depends on one's ability to obtain a new job which offers health insurance coverage. Also, individuals with a high propensity for job changes are less likely to be hired by employers who offer coverage than are low mobility individuals. Models of job mobility and health insurance acquisition are estimated using longitudinal data on 21-35 year olds from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. The estimates of health insurance coverage show that employed individuals who have a history of severe illness or who live in states with high average health care costs are substantially less likely to be in jobs which offer coverage than are individuals who do not have a previous history of serious illness or who live in low cost states. For example, the model predicts that employees with three or more prior illness spells lasting longer than a week are 22 percent less likely to be in jobs that offer coverage than are individuals with no such prior spells. The job mobility estimates show that the existence of health insurance coverage at a current job has no negative effect on job mobility once an individual's propensity to change jobs is added as a control in the job mobility equation. This result together with the health insurance estimates strongly suggest that legislation which guarantees health insurance portability, such as the Kennedy-Kassebaum bill now in Congress, is unlikely to have a significant positive effect on job mobility; it may actually make health insurance coverage less available by increasing the burden on employers who offer health insurance as a fringe benefit, thus decreasing their willingness to do so.
Bibliography Citation
Slade, Eric Phillip. An Economic Analysis of Employer Related Health Insurance Coverage and Job Mobility in The United States. Ph.D. Dissertation, Brown University, 1997.
3. Slade, Eric Phillip
Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Parent Perception of Child Need for Mental Health Care Following School Disciplinary Events
Mental Health Services Research 6,2 (June 2004): 75-92.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/w184k1503143775r/
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Kluwer Academic Publishers
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Behavioral Problems; Children, Mental Health; Discipline; Grade Retention/Repeat Grade; Health, Mental/Psychological; Hispanics; Public Schools; Racial Differences; School Dropouts; School Progress; School Suspension/Expulsion

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Disciplinary problems at school potentially affect parent perception of child need for mental health care. This article explores effects of a child's first school suspension or expulsion on parent perception of child need for services in three racial/ethnic subgroups. Subjects were mothers participating in a national longitudinal study and their children. First-time school suspension or expulsion positively affected service use and parent-reported service need among white non-Hispanic children, but had little or no effect for African American and Hispanic children. These results suggest that information on child behavior provided to parents by teachers and school administrators can influence parent perception of child service need, but that racial-ethnic differences may exist in parent interpretation of and response to this information. Culturally appropriate approaches to relaying information to parents about child service need may help reduce these differences.
Bibliography Citation
Slade, Eric Phillip. "Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Parent Perception of Child Need for Mental Health Care Following School Disciplinary Events." Mental Health Services Research 6,2 (June 2004): 75-92.
4. Slade, Eric Phillip
Wissow, Lawrence S.
Spanking in Early Childhood and Later Behavior Problems: A Prospective Study of Infants and Young Toddlers
Pediatrics 113, 5 (May 2004): 1321-1330.
Also: http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/content/full/113/5/1321
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: American Academy of Pediatrics
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Children, Behavioral Development; Discipline; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness; Parenting Skills/Styles; Punishment, Corporal; Temperament

Objective. To explore the relationship of spanking frequency before age 2 with behavior problems near time of entry into school.

Methods. Children who were younger than 2 years were followed up 4 years later, after they had entered school. The likelihood of significant behavior problems at follow-up was estimated in multivariate analyses that controlled for baseline spanking frequency and other characteristics. Participants were mothers from a large-scale national study and their children. Statistical analysis included an ethnically diverse sample of 1966 children aged 0 to 23 months at baseline. Two dichotomous indicators of behavior problems were used. The first indicated that maternal rating of child behavior problems exceeded a threshold. The second indicated that a mother met with a school administrator to discuss her child's behavior problems.

Results. White non-Hispanic children who were spanked more frequently before age 2 were substantially more likely to have behavior problems after entry into school, controlling for other factors. For Hispanic and black children, associations between spanking frequency and behavior problems were not statistically significant and were not consistent across outcome measures.

Conclusion. Among white non-Hispanic children but not among black and Hispanic children, spanking frequency before age 2 is significantly and positively associated with child behavior problems at school age. These findings are consistent with those reported in studies of children older than 2 years but extend these findings to children who are spanked beginning at a relatively early age.

Bibliography Citation
Slade, Eric Phillip and Lawrence S. Wissow. "Spanking in Early Childhood and Later Behavior Problems: A Prospective Study of Infants and Young Toddlers." Pediatrics 113, 5 (May 2004): 1321-1330.