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Author: Rosenberg, Sam
Resulting in 5 citations.
1. Power, Marilyn
Rosenberg, Sam
Black Women Clerical Workers: Movement Toward Equality with White Women?
Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economy and Society 32,2 (May 1993): 223-237.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1468-232X.1993.tb01028.x/abstract
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: Institute of Industrial Relations, University of California, Berkeley
Keyword(s): Mobility; Racial Equality/Inequality; Women

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This article examines the occupational mobility patterns of black and white female clerical workers from 1972 to 1980. Black women were initially concentrated in the lower-paying clerical positions and were less likely than white women to leave for better jobs in other areas. Those black women who had relatively good clerical jobs tended not to rise any further and even experienced some difficulty in maintaining their occupational status. Education and training aided occupational mobility less for black women than for white women.
Bibliography Citation
Power, Marilyn and Sam Rosenberg. "Black Women Clerical Workers: Movement Toward Equality with White Women?" Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economy and Society 32,2 (May 1993): 223-237.
2. Power, Marilyn
Rosenberg, Sam
Race, Class, and Occupational Mobility: Black and White Women in Service Work in the United States
Feminist Economics 1,3 (Fall 1995): 40-59.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/714042248
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: Routledge ==> Taylor & Francis (1998)
Keyword(s): Black Youth; Mobility, Occupational; Racial Differences; Social Roles; Women

Data from the 1972 & 1988 National Longitudinal Survey of Young Women are drawn on to compare the occupational mobility of 135 black & 261 white women who worked in service occupations in the US in their late teens & 20s. A descriptive methodology is used to help illuminate the complex interaction of race, gender, & class in the lives of these women, focusing on exploring how being a service worker when young contributed to a different life story for women of different races & classes. Analysis indicates that black women experienced considerably less occupational mobility than white women, & were far more likely to get stuck in low-paid service occupations over the long term. Many of the white women, but few of the black, were able to use service work as a temporary means of support while they prepared themselves for more lucrative employment. Striking differences in class background & presence of children appeared to contribute to racial difference in mobility. 10 Tables, 27 References. Adapted from the source document. (Copyright 1996, Sociological Abstracts, Inc., all rights reserved.)
Bibliography Citation
Power, Marilyn and Sam Rosenberg. "Race, Class, and Occupational Mobility: Black and White Women in Service Work in the United States." Feminist Economics 1,3 (Fall 1995): 40-59.
3. Rosenberg, Sam
Economic Contractions and Racial Differentials in Male Job Mobility
Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economics and Society 26,3 (September 1987): 291-295.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1468-232X.1987.tb00714.x/abstract
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: Institute of Industrial Relations, University of California, Berkeley
Keyword(s): Business Cycles; Duncan Index; Mobility; Mobility, Occupational; Racial Differences; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using data drawn from the National Longitudinal Surveys, the effects of the economic contraction of 1969-1975 on the occupational mobility of older black and white male workers was examined. The sample contained 440 black and 1,041 white males who: (1) reported a current occupation, (2) were not enrolled in school, and (3) indicated their major activity during the survey week was either "working" or "with a job but not at work." It was limited to the years 1966, 1969, and 1975. Occupational standing was measured with the one-digit Census occupation and the Duncan socioeconomic status index (SES), an ordinal prestige scale assigning a rank between 0-97 to each of the 3-digit 1960 Census occupations. Overall, in 1969, whites held positions with an average SES value of 42.83, while those held by blacks averaged 21.91. The average SES scores were virtually the same in 1969 and 1975. Although many workers changed positions, these fluctuations balanced out. Accumulated evidence concerning two economic contractions in the early 1980s suggests that black men were more negatively affected by the economic conditions than were white men. Moreover, black men who lost their jobs were less likely to locate other positions than white men. [ABI/INFORM]
Bibliography Citation
Rosenberg, Sam. "Economic Contractions and Racial Differentials in Male Job Mobility." Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economics and Society 26,3 (September 1987): 291-295.
4. Rosenberg, Sam
Occupational Mobility and Short Cycles
In: Dynamics of Labour Market Segmentation. F. Wilkinson, ed. New York, NY: Academic Press, 1981
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: Academic Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Business Cycles; Career Patterns; Duncan Index; Labor Market, Secondary; Mobility; Mobility, Job; Occupational Aspirations; Socioeconomic Status (SES); Work History

The author examined the impact of cyclical fluctuations, during l966-75, on the occupational experience of older male workers. Within a labor market segmentation framework, the questions analyzed were: (1) what is the extent of upward occupational mobility from the secondary sector to the primary sector in times of economic expansion; (2) what is the extent of downward occupational mobility from the primary sector to the secondary sector during economic downturns; (3) what is the degree of permanence of upward occupational mobility over the business cycle; and (4) what racial differentials exist in mobility patterns? The findings suggest that there is some upward mobility from the secondary sector to the primary sector during the expansion phase of the business cycle. However, many workers return to the secondary sector during economic slumps. The particular mobility patterns observed correlate to a degree with trends in labor demand, as measured by fluctuations in the size of different occupations over the business cycle, and the extent of unemployment in those occupations.
Bibliography Citation
Rosenberg, Sam. "Occupational Mobility and Short Cycles" In: Dynamics of Labour Market Segmentation. F. Wilkinson, ed. New York, NY: Academic Press, 1981
5. Rosenberg, Sam
Racial Differences in Younger Male Occupational Mobility over the Business Cycle, 1966-1975
Presented: New York NY, Industrial Relations Research Association Annual Meeting, December 1985. IRRA Proceedings (1986): 391-399.
Also: http://www.eric.ed.gov/PDFS/ED286969.pdf
Cohort(s): Young Men
Publisher: Industrial Relations Research Association ==> LERA
Keyword(s): Business Cycles; Mobility; Mobility, Occupational; Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper examines the effects of cyclical fluctuations during 1966-1975 on the occupational mobility of younger black and white male workers. Blacks were more likely to be found at the bottom of the occupational hierarchy than were whites in 1966, 1969, and 1975. Both groups moved up the occupational structure over the time period. However, whites beginning in the same occupation as blacks generally improved their occupational standing more than did blacks.
Bibliography Citation
Rosenberg, Sam. "Racial Differences in Younger Male Occupational Mobility over the Business Cycle, 1966-1975." Presented: New York NY, Industrial Relations Research Association Annual Meeting, December 1985. IRRA Proceedings (1986): 391-399.