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Author: Richman, Scott
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. Mandara, Jelani
Varner, Fatima
Greene, Nereira
Richman, Scott
Intergenerational Family Predictors of the Black–White Achievement Gap
Journal of Educational Psychology 101,4 (November 2009): 867-878.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B6WYD-4XRB1BJ-8&_user=10&_coverDate=11%2F30%2F2009&_rdoc=1&_fmt=high&_orig=search&_origin=search&_sort=d&_docanchor=&view=c&_searchStrId=1445411383&_rerunOrigin=google&_acct=C000050221&_version=1&_urlVersion=0&_userid=10&md5=a58744d92191a40bde5e2d07444cc995&searchtype=a
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: American Psychological Association (APA)
Keyword(s): Child Self-Administered Supplement (CSAS); Chores (see Housework); Ethnic Differences; Family Structure; Grandparents; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Housework/Housewives; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Parenting Skills/Styles; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading)

The authors examined intergenerational family predictors of the Black–White achievement gap among 4,406 adolescents from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. An intergenerational model of the process by which family factors contribute to the achievement gap was also tested. The results showed that the ethnic gaps in socioeconomic status (SES) and achievement had significantly reduced over the past few generations. Moreover, measures of grandparent SES, mothers' achievement, parent SES, and a comprehensive set of reliable parenting practices explained all of the ethnic differences in achievement scores. Parenting practices such as creating a school-oriented home environment, allowing adolescents to make decisions, and not burdening them with too many chores had particularly important effects on the achievement gap. The authors conclude that adjusting for these differences would eliminate the ethnic achievement gap.
Bibliography Citation
Mandara, Jelani, Fatima Varner, Nereira Greene and Scott Richman. "Intergenerational Family Predictors of the Black–White Achievement Gap." Journal of Educational Psychology 101,4 (November 2009): 867-878.
2. Mandara, Jelani
Varner, Fatima
Richman, Scott
Do African American Mothers Really "Love" Their Sons and "Raise" Their Daughters?
Journal of Family Psychology 24,1 (February 2010): 41-50.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0893320010600062
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: American Psychological Association (APA)
Keyword(s): Behavioral Differences; Behavioral Problems; Black Family; Black Studies; Gender Differences; Siblings; Sociability/Socialization/Social Interaction

This study assessed 1500 adolescents from the National Longitudinal Study of Youth to test the hypothesis that African American mothers differentially socialize their girls and boys. The results showed that later-born boys had fewer chores, argued more with their mothers, lived in less cognitively stimulating homes, and were not allowed to make the same decisions as were the girls or firstborn boys at the same age. The later-born boys were also lowest in achievement and highest in externalizing behaviors. Parenting differences accounted for the achievement differences but not for the externalizing behavior differences. It was concluded that the later-born boys would achieve at the same rates as their siblings if they were socialized in the same manner as their siblings.
Bibliography Citation
Mandara, Jelani, Fatima Varner and Scott Richman. "Do African American Mothers Really "Love" Their Sons and "Raise" Their Daughters? ." Journal of Family Psychology 24,1 (February 2010): 41-50.