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Author: Renna, Francesco
Resulting in 8 citations.
1. Kosteas, Vasilios D.
Renna, Francesco
The Impact of Job Displacement on Employer Based Health Insurance Coverage
Journal of Labor Research 30,4 (2009): 317-327.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/fg75964861187501/
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Benefits, Fringe; Benefits, Insurance; Displaced Workers; Insurance, Health

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We analyze the effect of job displacement on the probability that employer based health insurance is made available to workers. Using fixed and random effects logit models, we do find that displacement is associated with a lower probability of having access to an employer based health insurance plan. Overall this penalty is quite small (between 2 and 3 percentage points), but it becomes substantial (about 16 percentage points) for displaced workers who have been with the current employer for less than 6 months. While we do not find evidence that the penalty associated with being displaced has worsened in recent years, we do find that employers respond to economic hardship by cutting back on fringe benefits.
Bibliography Citation
Kosteas, Vasilios D. and Francesco Renna. "The Impact of Job Displacement on Employer Based Health Insurance Coverage ." Journal of Labor Research 30,4 (2009): 317-327.
2. Renna, Francesco
Alcohol Abuse, Alcoholism, and Labor Market Outcomes: Looking for the Missing Link
Industrial and Labor Relations Review 62,1 (October 2008): 92-103.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25249186
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: New York State School of Industrial and Labor Relations, Cornell University
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders; Earnings; Labor Market Outcomes; Modeling; Wages; Work Hours

There is puzzling evidence that alcohol abuse and alcoholism reduce labor earnings but have no effect on either hours worked or the hourly wage. This study revisits the link between problem drinking and earnings using data from the 1989 and 1994 waves of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. Questions about problem drinking were keyed to a table of symptoms for alcohol abuse and alcoholism in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. The author finds no effects associated with alcohol abuse. In OLS regressions, alcoholism appears to have had negative effects on both labor market outcomes. In the lag variable and in the first difference regressions, alcoholism's negative effect on wages disappears, but its negative effect on hours of work remains, suggesting that the negative effect of alcoholism on earnings operates through reduced work hours. These results of the two-stage least squares are inconclusive. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Renna, Francesco. "Alcohol Abuse, Alcoholism, and Labor Market Outcomes: Looking for the Missing Link." Industrial and Labor Relations Review 62,1 (October 2008): 92-103.
3. Renna, Francesco
Economic Cost of Teen Drinking
Working Paper, Department of Economics, University of Akron, 2005
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Department of Economics, University of Akron
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Endogeneity; High School Completion/Graduates; High School Diploma; Wage Levels

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper analyzes the effect that heavy drinking has on the probability of graduating on-time from high school. This analysis was motivated by the empirical evidence that students who graduate on-time from high school earn more than students who graduate late. The analysis is conducted on students in their senior year of high school using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979. Importantly, this paper shows that the usual instruments used to correct for the endogeneity of the decision to drink are strong instrument only in the regression for women, but not for men. Finally this paper finds that heavy drinking decreases the probability of graduating on-time by 17.5 percent. Because graduating late decreases the hourly wage of women by $0.90, the annual cost of drinking computed for a full-time worker is about $315.
Bibliography Citation
Renna, Francesco. "Economic Cost of Teen Drinking." Working Paper, Department of Economics, University of Akron, 2005.
4. Renna, Francesco
Obesity History and Male Employment
Applied Economics Letters 22,2 (January 2015): 116-120.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13504851.2014.929617#.VIiOQWNkfsk
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Routledge ==> Taylor & Francis (1998)
Keyword(s): Body Mass Index (BMI); Employment; Male Sample; Modeling, Probit; Obesity

Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979, this article computes the stock of obesity as the number of obese years in the adult life of an individual. Then it estimates the effect of the stock of obesity on the probability of being employed. It is found that the accumulated years of morbid obesity (i.e. obesity associated with a body mass index above 40) has a large negative impact on employment status. This effect remains significant even after conditioning on time-invariant unobserved heterogeneity. The results of the IV probit analysis indicate that the stock of morbid obese years can be regarded as exogenous. Less severe levels of obesity do not seem to have an impact on employment.
Bibliography Citation
Renna, Francesco. "Obesity History and Male Employment." Applied Economics Letters 22,2 (January 2015): 116-120.
5. Renna, Francesco
Teens' Alcohol Consumption and Schooling
Working Paper, Department of Economics, University of Akron, 2006
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Department of Economics, University of Akron
Keyword(s): Academic Development; Alcohol Use; Cognitive Development; Educational Attainment; GED/General Educational Diploma/General Equivalency Degree/General Educational Development; High School Diploma; High School Dropouts

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

While research outside economics has found that drinking has a negative effect on cognitive skills, some economists have failed to find any negative relationship between drinking and academic performance. This paper argues that the reason for this discrepancy is due to the way education is measured in the economic literature. Usually, academic achievement is measured in terms of number of years of completed education at the age of 25. Hence, both a General Equivalency Diploma (GED) and a high school diploma are considered equivalent to 12 years of completed education, even if GED graduates have earnings more similar to high school dropouts. This study shows that binge drinking reduces the probability of receiving a high school diploma and increases the probability of graduating with a GED. Moreover, this study finds that alcohol policies do not affect the dropout rate measured at the age of 25, but they do affect the probability that a student will graduate on time. In conclusion, bingeing is found to be responsible for inducing individuals to temporarily drop out of school. Eventually, these individuals return to school to complete their education, most likely by obtaining a GED diploma.
Bibliography Citation
Renna, Francesco. "Teens' Alcohol Consumption and Schooling." Working Paper, Department of Economics, University of Akron, 2006.
6. Renna, Francesco
Teens’ Alcohol Consumption and Schooling
Economics of Education Review 27,1 (February 2008): 69-78.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0272775706001051
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Academic Development; Adolescent Behavior; Alcohol Use; Educational Attainment; GED/General Educational Diploma/General Equivalency Degree/General Educational Development; High School Diploma; High School Dropouts; Modeling, Instrumental Variables; Self-Esteem; State-Level Data/Policy

While research outside economics has found that drinking has a negative effect on cognitive skills, some economists have failed to find any negative relationship between drinking and academic performance. This paper argues that the reason for this discrepancy is due to the way education is measured in the economic literature. Herein, binge drinking in the senior year of high school is found to reduce the probability of receiving a high school diploma and to increase the probability of graduating with a General Education Development (GED). Moreover, this study finds that alcohol policies do not affect the dropout rate measured at the age of 25, but they do affect the probability that a student will graduate on time. In conclusion, bingeing is found to be responsible for inducing individuals to temporarily drop out of school. Eventually, these individuals return to school to complete their education, most likely by obtaining a GED diploma.
Bibliography Citation
Renna, Francesco. "Teens’ Alcohol Consumption and Schooling." Economics of Education Review 27,1 (February 2008): 69-78.
7. Renna, Francesco
The Economic Cost of Teen Drinking: Late Graduation and Lowered Earnings
Health Economics 16,4 (April 2007): 407-419.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/hec.1178/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Earnings; Endogeneity; Gender Differences; High School Completion/Graduates; High School Students; Occupational Choice

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper analyzes the effect that binge drinking has on the probability of graduating on time from high school and on future earnings. The analysis is conducted on students in their senior year of high school using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979. Importantly, the usual instruments used to correct for the endogeneity of the drinking variable are found to be robust only for women. This paper finds that heavy drinking decreases the probability of graduating on time. Binge drinking does not have a direct impact on adults' labor earnings, but graduating late results in lower labor income. Because of a late graduation, young men who binge in high school will face an earnings penalty of 1.5-1.84 percentage points. Women also face a penalty, but this seems mostly due to the fact that women who graduate late work in industries and occupations that pay less. (Copyright (c) 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.)
Bibliography Citation
Renna, Francesco. "The Economic Cost of Teen Drinking: Late Graduation and Lowered Earnings." Health Economics 16,4 (April 2007): 407-419.
8. Renna, Francesco
King, Randall H.
The Impact of Racial Discrimination on the Early Career Outcomes of Young Men
Atlantic Economic Journal 35,3 (September 2007): 269-278.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/0p171767pw146028/
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: International Atlantic Economic Society
Keyword(s): Discrimination; Economics of Discrimination; Economics of Minorities; Fertility; Labor Market Outcomes; Racial Differences; Wage Differentials; Wage Gap; Wages, Young Men

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The NLSY dataset is utilized to measure the extent of employer wage discrimination between white and black males during their first 5 years of post-school employment. We look at the respondent's first job and the jobs 1 and 5 years after school completion. Oaxaca wage decompositions are employed to gauge the effect of discrimination. Consistent with our hypothesis, we find that the discrimination component of the wage gap falls over time. For the first job out of school the unexplained wage gap between blacks and whites is 35%. By year 5, the unexplained component falls to about 13%. Thus, while discrimination continues to play a role in explaining the white-black wage gap over time, its impact decreases as time in the labor market increases.
Bibliography Citation
Renna, Francesco and Randall H. King. "The Impact of Racial Discrimination on the Early Career Outcomes of Young Men." Atlantic Economic Journal 35,3 (September 2007): 269-278.