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Author: Reeder, Lori
Resulting in 3 citations.
1. Reeder, Lori
Parental Income, College Attendance, and First Birth Timing
Presented: Boston MA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, May 2014
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Age at First Birth; College Enrollment; Income; Parental Influences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Whereas previous studies have estimated first birth differentials by race and education, the present study is the first to do so by parental income. The NLSY97 is employed to examine first birth timing across parental income quartiles among a recent cohort of U.S. women. Women from the lowest parental income quartile experience earlier first births, and higher hazards of first birth, relative to women in the middle parental income quartiles. Women in the highest parental income quartile exhibit the latest, and lowest hazard, of first birth. The relationship between parental income and fertility timing is examined through the intervening variable of college attendance.
Bibliography Citation
Reeder, Lori. "Parental Income, College Attendance, and First Birth Timing." Presented: Boston MA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, May 2014.
2. Reeder, Lori
Parental Resources, Educational Progression, and Family Formation
Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Sociology, University of Maryland, College Park, 2014
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: ProQuest Dissertations & Theses (PQDT)
Keyword(s): College Education; Debt/Borrowing; Educational Attainment; First Birth; Household Income; Parental Influences; Student Loans; Transition, Adulthood

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

In this dissertation, I use longitudinal data (1997-2011) to explore two types of financial constraints during the transition to adulthood. First, I explore the relationship between parental resources (income and net household worth) and educational transitions among U.S. men and women. I revisit the Mare model of educational transitions which asserts that parental resources decline in importance with each educational transition. I find that, for the current cohort of young adults, parental net worth, in particular, is positively associated with high school graduation, four-year college attendance, and four-year college completion. Yet, the magnitude of the effect of parental net worth does decline with each educational transition. Furthermore, after controlling for parental income and net household worth, non-Hispanic Black and Hispanic students are more likely to graduate from high school and to enroll in college, yet remain less likely to graduate from college. For enrollment into professional or graduate school, the effect of parental resources is statistically nonsignificant. Next, I examine the relationship between parental resources and timing of women's first birth. I find that parental resources impact first birth timing, wherein compared to women from low-resource families, women from middle-resource families have a lower likelihood of first birth through the mid-20s and women from high-resources families were found to have substantially lower likelihood of having a first birth by age 30 or 31. I find that greater and earlier incidence of Hispanic women's first birth is entirely explained by differences in parental resources and other sociodemographic characteristics. Furthermore, differences in parental resources explain the higher likelihood of first births in teen years, and most of the higher likelihood of first births in the 20s, among Black women. Finally, I consider whether student loan debt delays family formation for men and women attending four-y ear college. I find that student loan debt is associated with later transitions to marriage and first birth, for both women and men, but that only for women does a statistically significant association remain after controlling for income, family background, and other socio-demographic characteristics, and even then only at low levels of debt.
Bibliography Citation
Reeder, Lori. Parental Resources, Educational Progression, and Family Formation. Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Sociology, University of Maryland, College Park, 2014.
3. Reeder, Lori
Kahn, Joan R.
The Effects of Student Loan Debt on the Transition to Parenthood
Presented: Denver CO, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2012
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Debt/Borrowing; Fertility; Gender Differences; Student Loans; Transition, Adulthood

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper uses data from the 1997 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY97) cohort to examine the relationship between student loan debt and fertility decisions during the transition to adulthood. We hypothesize that the burden of loan debt will lead women (and men) to feel greater financial insecurity and therefore postpone (and potentially forego) the family building process. We test these ideas using two approaches: first, we use cross-sectional data from the 2009 wave of the NLSY97 (when respondents were ages 24-30) to explore the relationship between loan debt and both childlessness and the number of children ever born. We find that, net of all controls in the model, student loan debt is negatively and significantly associated with the fertility of young adult women. It appears that the key difference is between those with and without debt, since among those with debt, there is relatively little difference by level of debt. In the second part of our analysis, we will use event history methods to model the impact of time-varying measures of debt on the timing of first births.
Bibliography Citation
Reeder, Lori and Joan R. Kahn. "The Effects of Student Loan Debt on the Transition to Parenthood." Presented: Denver CO, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2012.