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Author: Ramanan, Janaki
Resulting in 6 citations.
1. Vandell, Deborah Lowe
Ramanan, Janaki
After School Care and Child Development: Children of the NLSY
Presented: Seattle, WA, Biennial Meetings of the Society for Research in Child Development, April 1991
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD)
Keyword(s): Child Care; General Assessment

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Bibliography Citation
Vandell, Deborah Lowe and Janaki Ramanan. "After School Care and Child Development: Children of the NLSY." Presented: Seattle, WA, Biennial Meetings of the Society for Research in Child Development, April 1991.
2. Vandell, Deborah Lowe
Ramanan, Janaki
Children of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth: Choices in After School Care and Child Development
Working Paper, Madison WI: Department of Educational Psychology, University of Wisconsin, 1991
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Department of Educational Psychology, University of Wisconsin
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Child Care; Children, Behavioral Development; General Assessment; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Memory for Digit Span (WISC) - also see Digit Span; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT); Peers/Peer influence/Peer relations; Self-Esteem; Self-Perception Profile for Children (SPPC)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

After-school care was examined for 390 3rd through 5th graders who were part of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. Mother care after school was associated with lower family incomes, more poverty, and less emotional support. In other areas (child's sex, age, race, family marital status, mother's age, and cognitive stimulation), families did not differ in their selection of after-school care. Children in the care of single mothers after school in comparison with children in other types of adult supervised after-school care had lower Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test scores and higher ratings for antisocial behaviors, anxiety, and peer conflicts. Latchkey care was also associated with more behavior problems. However, these problems disappeared when family income and emotional support were controlled, suggesting that type of after-school care per se is less important than the quality of children's experiences with their families.
Bibliography Citation
Vandell, Deborah Lowe and Janaki Ramanan. "Children of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth: Choices in After School Care and Child Development." Working Paper, Madison WI: Department of Educational Psychology, University of Wisconsin, 1991.
3. Vandell, Deborah Lowe
Ramanan, Janaki
Children of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth: Choices in After-School Care and Child Development
Developmental Psychology 27,4 (July 1991): 637-643.
Also: http://psycnet.apa.org/journals/dev/27/4/637/
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: American Psychological Association (APA)
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Behavioral Differences; Child Care; Child Development; Children, Behavioral Development; Family Income; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Income; Memory for Digit Span (WISC) - also see Digit Span; Parents, Single; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT); Poverty; Self-Esteem; Self-Perception Profile for Children (SPPC); Well-Being

The after school care (latchkey, mother, other adults) of 390 third, fourth, and fifth graders who were part of the Children of the NLSY was examined. Within this socially disadvantaged sample, mother-care after school was associated with lower family incomes, more poverty, and less emotional support of the school-aged child. In other areas (child sex, age, race, family marital status, mother age, and cognitive stimulation), families did not differ in their selection of after school care. This study also examined whether there were differences in child functioning associated with type of after school care, after controlling for family income and emotional support. Generally, latchkey children performed as well on a battery of social and cognitive assessments as children who were in other-adult care after school. In only one area was a subsample of latchkey children at risk. Latchkey children whose families were living in poverty were reported to have more antisocial behaviors. Children who returned home to single mothers showed more pervasive problems. In contrast to latchkey and other-adult care, this subsample of mother-care children had lower PPVT scores and higher rating for behavior problems.
Bibliography Citation
Vandell, Deborah Lowe and Janaki Ramanan. "Children of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth: Choices in After-School Care and Child Development." Developmental Psychology 27,4 (July 1991): 637-643.
4. Vandell, Deborah Lowe
Ramanan, Janaki
Effects of Early and Current Maternal Employment on Children from High Risk Families
Presented: Montreal, QC, International Conference on Infant Studies, 1990
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Author
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Children; Children, Academic Development; Earnings; Family Income; General Assessment; Maternal Employment; Memory for Digit Span (WISC) - also see Digit Span; Mothers; Mothers, Education; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Sex Roles; Welfare

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Patterns of early and concurrent maternal employment were examined in 224 second graders from "high risk" families using data from the Children of the NLSY. Extent of early maternal employment was related to the families' current finances and to the mothers' education. Families in which there was moderate or extensive maternal employment during the first three years were less likely to be living in poverty four years later; and maternal education was higher when mothers were extensively employed during the first three years. In addition, differences in the second graders' academic achievement were associated with extent of early employment, after controlling for differences in family poverty and maternal education. Children scored lower on reading and math achievement when their mothers were either not employed or minimally employed as opposed to when mothers worked more extensively during the first three years. Extent of early employment was more highly associated with second grade achievement than was concurrent maternal employment.
Bibliography Citation
Vandell, Deborah Lowe and Janaki Ramanan. "Effects of Early and Current Maternal Employment on Children from High Risk Families." Presented: Montreal, QC, International Conference on Infant Studies, 1990.
5. Vandell, Deborah Lowe
Ramanan, Janaki
Effects of Early and Recent Maternal Employment on Children from Low Income Families
Working Paper, Department of Educational Psychology, University of Wisconsin - Madison, 1990
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Department of Educational Psychology, University of Wisconsin
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Children; Children, Academic Development; Family Background; Family Income; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Marital Status; Maternal Employment; Mothers; Mothers, Education; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT); Poverty; Welfare

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Data drawn from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth are used to examine the effects of early and recent maternal employment in a sample of second-grade children from low-income families. Maternal employment is related to a number of selection factors. When mothers who were not employed are compared to employed mothers, the working mothers score higher on a mental aptitude tests and are more highly educated. In terms of measures of current family functioning, there is less poverty and higher home environment scores when mothers are employed. Multiple regressions showed that children's math achievement is positively predicted by early, maternal employment. Children's reading achievement is positively predicted by recent, maternal employment. Discussion of the results in terms of possible mechanisms by which maternal employment may affect children's development end the study.
Bibliography Citation
Vandell, Deborah Lowe and Janaki Ramanan. "Effects of Early and Recent Maternal Employment on Children from Low Income Families." Working Paper, Department of Educational Psychology, University of Wisconsin - Madison, 1990.
6. Vandell, Deborah Lowe
Ramanan, Janaki
Effects of Early and Recent Maternal Employment on Children from Low-Income Families
Child Development 63,4 (August 1992): 938-949.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1467-8624.1992.tb01673.x/abstract
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Children; Children, Academic Development; Children, School-Age; Family Background; Family Income; Home Environment; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Marital Status; Maternal Employment; Memory for Digit Span (WISC) - also see Digit Span; Mothers; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT); Poverty; Self-Esteem; Sex Roles; Welfare

The effects of early maternal employment (employment during the child's first 3 years) and recent maternal employment (employment during the previous 3 years) on 189 second-grade children from low-income families were examined. Maternal employment was related to a number of selection factors. In comparison to mothers who were not employed, employed mothers scored higher on a mental aptitude test and were more highly educated. Both early and recent maternal employment were also associated with measures of the current family functioning: there was less poverty and higher HOME environment scores when mothers were employed. Hierarchical multiple regressions showed that children's math achievement was positively predicted by early maternal employment and children's reading achievement was positively predicted by recent maternal employment. even after controlling for selection effects and current family: environment. These results are discussed in terms of possible mechanisms by which maternal employment may affect children's development.
Bibliography Citation
Vandell, Deborah Lowe and Janaki Ramanan. "Effects of Early and Recent Maternal Employment on Children from Low-Income Families." Child Development 63,4 (August 1992): 938-949.