Search Results

Author: Ragan, James F. Jr.
Resulting in 5 citations.
1. Bratsberg, Bernt
Ragan, James F. Jr.
Have Unions Impeded Growing Wage Dispersion Among Young Workers?
Journal of Labor Research 18,4 (December 1997): 593-612.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/0l431u0073189177/
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: John M. Olin Institute at George Mason University
Keyword(s): Educational Returns; Skills; Unions; Wage Equations; Wage Gap; Wages, Young Men

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Wage inequality is examined for young males over the period 1980-1993. While wage inequality increased substantially for nonunion workers over this period, wage inequality increased only modestly for union workers. In part, this difference results from divergent trends in skill prices -returns to skill rose in the nonunion sector but contracted slightly in the union sector. In particular, returns to education increased sharply in the nonunion sector while remaining stagnant in the union sector. At least for young workers, these findings suggest that unions have been largely successful in resisting market pressures for greater wage inequality. We also uncover evidence suggesting that, as relative returns to education decline in the union sector, highly educated young workers become less likely to choose union employment.
Bibliography Citation
Bratsberg, Bernt and James F. Jr. Ragan. "Have Unions Impeded Growing Wage Dispersion Among Young Workers?" Journal of Labor Research 18,4 (December 1997): 593-612.
2. Bratsberg, Bernt
Ragan, James F. Jr.
The Impact of Host-Country Schooling on Earnings: A Study of Male Immigrants in the United States
Journal of Human Resources 37,1 (Winter 2002): 63-105.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3069604
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: University of Wisconsin Press
Keyword(s): Earnings; Educational Attainment; Educational Returns; Immigrants; Language Aptitude; Male Sample; Schooling; Wages

Immigrants in the United States who acquire U.S. schooling earn higher wages than other immigrants. Using data from the U.S. censuses and the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, we show that this wage advantage results from both greater educational attainment and higher returns to education. The higher returns are not the consequence of ability bias or greater English proficiency of those who acquire U.S. schooling. Returns to years of non-U.S. education are higher for immigrants who complete their schooling in the United States, consistent with the view that U.S. schooling upgrades or certifies education received in the source country. For those without U.S. schooling, returns are higher for immigrants from highly developed countries and countries for which English is an official language.
Bibliography Citation
Bratsberg, Bernt and James F. Jr. Ragan. "The Impact of Host-Country Schooling on Earnings: A Study of Male Immigrants in the United States." Journal of Human Resources 37,1 (Winter 2002): 63-105.
3. Bratsberg, Bernt
Ragan, James F. Jr.
Nasir, Zafar Mueen
The Effect of Naturalization on Wage Growth: A Panel Study of Young Male Immigrants
Journal of Labor Economics 20,3 (July 2002).
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/339616
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
Keyword(s): Census of Population; Human Capital; Immigrants; Labor Force Participation; Unions; Wage Growth; Work History

For young male immigrants, naturalization facilitates assimilation into the U.S. labor market. Following naturalization, immigrants gain access to public-sector, white-collar, and union jobs, and wage growth accelerates. These findings are consistent with the proposition that naturalization fosters labor market success of immigrants by removing barriers to employment. Although the faster wage growth of immigrants who naturalize might alternatively be explained by greater human capital investment prior to naturalization, stemming from a long-term commitment to U.S. labor markets, there is no evidence that wage growth accelerates or that the distribution of jobs improves until after citizenship is attained. Finally, the gains from naturalization are greater for immigrants from less-developed countries and persist when we control for unobserved productivity characteristics of workers.

(See also, Nasir, Zaffar M. as alternative spelling for author's name.)

Bibliography Citation
Bratsberg, Bernt, James F. Jr. Ragan and Zafar Mueen Nasir. "The Effect of Naturalization on Wage Growth: A Panel Study of Young Male Immigrants." Journal of Labor Economics 20,3 (July 2002).
4. Ragan, James F. Jr.
Bratsberg, Bernt
Earnings Inequality Narrows for Young Workers Despite a Widening Wage Structure
The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance 35,4 (Winter 1995): 387-395.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/1062976995900446
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Wage Equations; Wage Rates; Wages, Youth; Work Hours

Inequality of wage rates has widened in the United States. But in equality of earnings also depends on the distribution of hours worked. If the distribution of hours contracts sufficiently, earnings inequality may narrow despite a widening wage structure. The present study examines recent trends in inequality for young workers and. consistent with the preceding scenario, finds that rising inequality of wage rates has been overwhelmed by declining inequality of hours worked. As a consequence, earnings inequality of young workers declined during the 1980s.
Bibliography Citation
Ragan, James F. Jr. and Bernt Bratsberg. "Earnings Inequality Narrows for Young Workers Despite a Widening Wage Structure." The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance 35,4 (Winter 1995): 387-395.
5. Ragan, James F. Jr.
Tremblay, Carol Horton
Testing for Employee Discrimination by Race and Sex
Journal of Human Resources 23,1 (Winter 1988): 123-137.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/145848
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: University of Wisconsin Press
Keyword(s): Discrimination; Discrimination, Racial/Ethnic; Discrimination, Sex; Occupations, Female; Wages

According to the theory of employee discrimination, if members of one group have a taste for discrimination against another group, they will demand a compensating wage premium for working with members of the other group. This study is the first to directly test this theory at the micro level. In an analysis of data from the NLSY, evidence was found that both white and nonwhite youths practice employee discrimination, although the form of this discrimination differs by race. Results hold for both the South and non-South, as well as for the country as a whole. The hypothesis of employee discrimination by sex was also examined but rejected.
Bibliography Citation
Ragan, James F. Jr. and Carol Horton Tremblay. "Testing for Employee Discrimination by Race and Sex." Journal of Human Resources 23,1 (Winter 1988): 123-137.