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Author: Quadlin, Natasha Y.
Resulting in 4 citations.
1. Conwell, Jordan A.
Quadlin, Natasha Y.
Race, Gender, Higher Education, and Socioeconomic Attainment: Evidence from Baby Boomers at Midlife
Social Forces 100,3 (March 2022): 990-1024.
Also: https://academic.oup.com/sf/advance-article-abstract/doi/10.1093/sf/soab010/6155846
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Keyword(s): College Characteristics; Colleges; Educational Returns; Ethnic Differences; Hispanics; Labor Force Participation; Labor Market Outcomes; Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This article investigates White, Black, and Hispanic men's and women's access and midlife labor market returns to college quality. To do so, we use data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth-1979 Cohort (NLSY-79), merged with college quality information from the Barron's Admissions Competitiveness Index. Although prior research has investigated similar dynamics in access and returns to higher education, this work typically excludes Hispanics and does not assess enrollments at community colleges and other less competitive colleges where Black and Hispanic enrollments tend to cluster. We find that Black-White and Hispanic-White differences in college quality, to Whites' advantage, were fully explained or reversed once we accounted for differences in students' backgrounds. At midlife, Hispanic and especially Black men had lower rates of labor force participation than White men who attended colleges of the same quality. Including such differences (i.e., years of no or part-time work) in assessing the earnings returns to college quality demonstrated striking disadvantages facing college-educated Black men relative to White men, which were not fully accounted for by background characteristics. Employment and earnings returns to college quality were not as disparate by race for women. Relative to White women, we find earnings advantages for Hispanic women among those who attended community colleges. This article demonstrates the utility of taking an intersectional and life course approach to the study of higher education and the economic returns to schooling.
Bibliography Citation
Conwell, Jordan A. and Natasha Y. Quadlin. "Race, Gender, Higher Education, and Socioeconomic Attainment: Evidence from Baby Boomers at Midlife." Social Forces 100,3 (March 2022): 990-1024.
2. Quadlin, Natasha Y.
Funding Sources, Family Income, and Fields of Study at Four-year Colleges
Presented: Seattle WA, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2016
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): College Cost; College Major/Field of Study/Courses; Debt/Borrowing; Family Income; Student Loans

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Research shows that receiving loans, family contributions, and grants has implications for college students, but one key outcome has been overlooked--fields of study. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, I assess how college funding is associated with first-term major and course selection throughout college. I find that as students' funding from loans increases, they are more likely to major in applied non-STEM fields (e.g., business), and less likely to be undeclared during the first term--particularly if they are from low- or middle-income families. Conversely, as funding from family contributions increases, students are more likely to be undeclared, and less likely to major or take courses in applied non-STEM fields. Receiving grants has little association with major or course fields. I argue that funding sources act as opportunities and constraints for college students, and that fields of study are the product of multiple sources of inequality.
Bibliography Citation
Quadlin, Natasha Y. "Funding Sources, Family Income, and Fields of Study at Four-year Colleges." Presented: Seattle WA, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2016.
3. Quadlin, Natasha Y.
Funding Sources, Family Income, and Fields of Study in College
Social Forces 96,1 (1 September 2017): 91-120.
Also: https://academic.oup.com/sf/article-abstract/doi/10.1093/sf/sox042/3829205/Funding-Sources-Family-Income-and-Fields-of-Study
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Keyword(s): College Cost; College Major/Field of Study/Courses; Family Income; Financial Assistance; Student Loans

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Research shows that receiving loans, family contributions, and grants has implications for students both during and after college, but one key outcome has been overlooked: fields of study. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth-1997 cohort (NLSY-97), this study is the first to assess how college funding is associated with first-term majors and course selection throughout college. I posit that funding sources effectively constrain students' fields of study, such that students choose majors and courses that align with their broader financial circumstances. As funding from loans increases, students are more likely to major in applied non-STEM fields (e.g., business, nursing) and less likely to be undeclared during the first term--particularly if students are from low- or middle-income families. Conversely, as funding from family contributions increases, students are more likely to be undeclared and less likely to major or take courses in applied non-STEM fields. Receiving grants bears little relation to students' major or course fields. These patterns suggest that funding sources entail distinct costs and benefits that may influence college student decision-making, and that fields of study are the product of multiple sources of inequality.
Bibliography Citation
Quadlin, Natasha Y. "Funding Sources, Family Income, and Fields of Study in College." Social Forces 96,1 (1 September 2017): 91-120.
4. Quadlin, Natasha Y.
Funding Sources, Family Income, and Fields of Study: Evidence from the NLSY97
Presented: Pacific Grove CA, Sociology of Education Association (SEA) Annual Conference, February 2016
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Sociology of Education Association
Keyword(s): College Major/Field of Study/Courses; Family Income; Financial Assistance; Higher Education; Student Loans

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Bibliography Citation
Quadlin, Natasha Y. "Funding Sources, Family Income, and Fields of Study: Evidence from the NLSY97." Presented: Pacific Grove CA, Sociology of Education Association (SEA) Annual Conference, February 2016.