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Author: Platt, Jonathan M.
Resulting in 3 citations.
1. Platt, Jonathan M.
Changes in Gendered Social Position and the Depression Gap over Time in the United States
Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Epidemiology, Columbia University, 2020
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: ProQuest Dissertations & Theses (PQDT)
Keyword(s): Depression (see also CESD); Gender Attitudes/Roles; Gender Differences; Health, Mental/Psychological; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Socioeconomic Background

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This dissertation applied social stress theory to better understand the social causes of the depression gap with three related aims. Aim 1 summarized the evidence for variation or stability in the depression gap in recent decades, through a systematic review and meta-regression of depression gap studies over time and by age. Aim 2 examined the evidence for a changing depression gap across birth cohorts, and tested the extent to which any changes over time were mediated by changing gender differences in education, employment, and housework rates, three indicators of broader trends in gendered social position through the 21st Century. Aim 3 examined whether women in the workforce with competing domestic labor roles were at increased risk of depression, and whether pro-family workplace benefits buffered the effects of competing roles.
Bibliography Citation
Platt, Jonathan M. Changes in Gendered Social Position and the Depression Gap over Time in the United States. Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Epidemiology, Columbia University, 2020.
2. Platt, Jonathan M.
Bates, Lisa
Jager, Justin
McLaughlin, Katie A.
Keyes, Katherine M.
Bringing Home the Benefits: Do Pro-Family Employee Benefits Mitigate the Risk of Depression from Competing Workplace and Domestic Labor Roles?
American Journal of Epidemiology published online (26 April 2024): kwae055.
Also: https://doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwae055
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press
Keyword(s): Benefits, Insurance; CESD (Depression Scale); Depression (see also CESD); Employee Benefits (ex: insurance); Employment; Employment Role Competition; Employment/Work, Domestic; Illnesses, Mental; Job Competition; Mental Health Inventory (MHI-5); Psychological Effects; Womens Health; Worker Health; Working Conditions

Despite significant historical progress toward gender parity in employment status in the US, women remain more likely to provide domestic labor, creating role competition which may increase depression symptoms. Pro-family employee benefits may minimize the stress of competing roles. We tested whether depressive symptoms were higher among women with vs. without competing roles and whether this effect was greater among women without (vs. with) pro-family benefits. Data included employed women surveyed across 4 waves of the National Longitudinal Survey (2010-2019) (N=9884). Depression symptoms were measured with the Mental Health Inventory (MHI-5). The interaction between competing roles and pro-family employee benefits on depressive symptoms was also compared with non-family-related benefits, using marginal structural models to estimate longitudinal effects in the presence of time-varying confounding. MHI-5 scores were 0.56 points higher (95% CI=0.15, 0.97) among women in competing roles (vs. not). Among women without pro-family benefits, competing roles increased MHI-5 scores by 6.1-points (95% CI=1.14, 11.1). In contrast, there was no association between competing roles and MHI-5 scores among women with access to these benefits (MHI-5 difference=0.44; 95% CI=-0.2, 1.0). Results were similar for non-family-related benefits. Dual workplace and domestic labor role competition increases women’s depression symptoms, though broad availability of workplace benefits may attenuate that risk.
Bibliography Citation
Platt, Jonathan M., Lisa Bates, Justin Jager, Katie A. McLaughlin and Katherine M. Keyes. "Bringing Home the Benefits: Do Pro-Family Employee Benefits Mitigate the Risk of Depression from Competing Workplace and Domestic Labor Roles?" American Journal of Epidemiology published online (26 April 2024): kwae055.
3. Platt, Jonathan M.
Bates, Lisa
Jager, Justin
McLaughlin, Katie A.
Keyes, Katherine M.
Changes in the Depression Gender Gap from 1992-2014: Cohort Effects and Mediation by Gendered Social Position
Social Science and Medicine 258 (August 2020): 113088.
Also: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0277953620303075
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): College Degree; Depression (see also CESD); Employment; Gender Attitudes/Roles; Gender Differences; Housework/Housewives; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission

The present study examined the evidence for a changing depression gap across birth cohorts and tested the extent to which any changes over time were mediated by changes in relative social position between women and men. Data were from the National Longitudinal Surveys. The depression gap was defined as differences in mean CESD scores for women vs. men. The analytic sample included 13,666 respondents interviewed from 1992-2014. Hierarchical mixed models estimated the magnitude of the gender depression gap over time, its association with 10-year birth cohort (range: 1957-1994), and whether any variation was mediated by ratios among women relative to men of obtaining a college degree, being employed full-time, and the average number of hours spent doing housework per week, three indicators of gendered social position. There was a linear decrease in the depression gap by 0.18 points across birth cohort (95% CI= -0.26, -0.10). The results of the mediation analysis estimated that an increasing ratio of college degree attainment mediated 39% of the gender depression gap across cohorts (95% CI= 0.18, 0.78). There was no evidence of mediation due to changing employment or housework ratios. These findings partially support the hypothesis that the depression gap is changing over time and is meaningfully related to the social environment.
Bibliography Citation
Platt, Jonathan M., Lisa Bates, Justin Jager, Katie A. McLaughlin and Katherine M. Keyes. "Changes in the Depression Gender Gap from 1992-2014: Cohort Effects and Mediation by Gendered Social Position." Social Science and Medicine 258 (August 2020): 113088.