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Author: Pischke, Jorn-Steffen
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. Acemoglu, Daron
Pischke, Jorn-Steffen
Minimum Wages and On-the-Job Training
NBER Working Paper No. 7184, National Bureau of Economic Research, June 1999
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)
Keyword(s): Human Capital; Minimum Wage; Skilled Workers; Training, On-the-Job; Wages

Becker's theory of human capital predicts that minimum wages should reduce training investments for affected workers, because they prevent these workers from taking wage cuts necessary to finance training. We show that when the assumption of perfectly competitive labor markets underlying this theory is relaxed, minimum wages can increase training of affected workers, by inducing firms to train their unskilled employees. More generally, a minimum wage increases training for constrained workers, while reducing it for those taking wage cuts to finance their training. We provide new estimates on the impact of the state and federal increases in the minimum wage between 1987 and 1992 of the training of low wage workers. We find no evidence that minimum wages reduce training. These results are consistent with our model, but difficult to reconcile with the standard theory of human capital.
Bibliography Citation
Acemoglu, Daron and Jorn-Steffen Pischke. "Minimum Wages and On-the-Job Training." NBER Working Paper No. 7184, National Bureau of Economic Research, June 1999.
2. Lordan, Grace
Pischke, Jorn-Steffen
Does Rosie Like Riveting? Male and Female Occupational Choices
NBER Working Paper No. 22495, National Bureau of Economic Research, August 2016.
Also: http://www.nber.org/papers/w22495
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)
Keyword(s): British Household Panel Survey (BHPS); Gender Differences; Job Satisfaction; Occupational Choice; Occupational Segregation; Occupations, Female; Occupations, Male; Russia Longitudinal Monitoring Survey (RLMS); Wage Gap

Occupational segregation and pay gaps by gender remain large while many of the constraints traditionally believed to be responsible for these gaps have weakened over time. Here, we explore the possibility that women and men have different tastes for the content of the work they do. We run regressions of job satisfaction on the share of males in an occupation. Overall, there is a strong negative relationship between female satisfaction and the share of males. This relationship is fairly stable across different specifications and contexts, and the magnitude of the association is not attenuated by personal characteristics or other occupation averages. Notably, the effect is muted for women but largely unchanged for men when we include three measures that proxy the content and context of the work in an occupation, which we label 'people,' 'brains,' and 'brawn.' These results suggest that women may care more about job content, and this is a possible factor preventing them from entering some male dominated professions. We continue to find a strong negative relationship between female satisfaction and the occupation level share of males in a separate analysis that includes share of males in the firm. This suggests that we are not just picking up differences in the work environment, although these seem to play an independent and important role as well.
Bibliography Citation
Lordan, Grace and Jorn-Steffen Pischke. "Does Rosie Like Riveting? Male and Female Occupational Choices." NBER Working Paper No. 22495, National Bureau of Economic Research, August 2016.