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Author: Pavetti, Ladonna Ann
Resulting in 7 citations.
1. Hershey, Alan M.
Pavetti, Ladonna Ann
Turning Job Finders into Job Keepers
The Future of Children: Welfare to Work 7,1, (Spring 1997): 74-86.
Also: http://www.futureofchildren.org/pubs-info2825/pubs-info_show.htm?doc_id=72223
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs - Princeton - Brookings
Keyword(s): Aid for Families with Dependent Children (AFDC); Employment, Part-Time; Family Studies; Job Search; Job Turnover; Labor Force Participation; Layoffs; Part-Time Work; Welfare; Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Most welfare-to-work programs designed to help single mothers leave welfare for employment focus on the challenge of finding a job. This article looks beyond the point of employment to consider the difficulty many former welfare recipients have keeping their jobs. The authors review evidence showing that many families cycle back and forth between welfare and work, losing jobs and resuming to public assistance while they seek work again. Factors contributing to high rates of job loss include characteristics of the job and of the worker: Temporary jobs, frequent layoffs, low pay in relation to work expenses, lack of experience meeting employer expectations, and personal or family problems all lead to dismissals and resignations. Drawing from the experience of innovative programs, the authors recommend policy changes and program approaches that can help families overcome setbacks and stabilize their lives as they move from welfare into increasingly stable employment. Copyright 1997 by Center for the Future of Children. The David and Lucile Packard Foundation. All rights reserved.
Bibliography Citation
Hershey, Alan M. and Ladonna Ann Pavetti. "Turning Job Finders into Job Keepers." The Future of Children: Welfare to Work 7,1, (Spring 1997): 74-86.
2. Hershey, Alan M.
Pavetti, Ladonna Ann
Turning Job Finders into Job Keepers; Helping Welfare Recipients Keep Their Jobs; Includes Related Articles on Welfare
Spectrum: the Journal of State Government 70,3 (June 1997): 14-19.
Also: http://stars.csg.org/spectrum/1997/summer/su97spe14.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: CSG - Council of State Governments
Keyword(s): Aid for Families with Dependent Children (AFDC); Child Care; Children; Job Aspirations; Job Search; Job Turnover; Labor Force Participation; Private Sector; Public Sector; Re-employment; Unemployment Rate, Regional; Welfare

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The David and Lucille Packard Foundation Center for the Future of Children has found that public and private sector initiatives can produce promising approaches for helping to keep welfare recipients in employment. Lessons to be learnt from programs adressing job losses include simplifying access to transitional Medicaid and child care services, the importance of the personal attention of counselors, the importance of program flexibility and creative staff, the realization that leaving welfare is a process and not an event, and the possibility that reemployment help provided outside the welfare system may reduce returns to welfare.
Bibliography Citation
Hershey, Alan M. and Ladonna Ann Pavetti. "Turning Job Finders into Job Keepers; Helping Welfare Recipients Keep Their Jobs; Includes Related Articles on Welfare." Spectrum: the Journal of State Government 70,3 (June 1997): 14-19.
3. Pavetti, Ladonna Ann
Against The Odds: Steady Employment Among Low-Skilled Women
Report, Urban Institute, Washington, D.C., July 1, 1997.
Also: http://www.urban.org/url.cfm?ID=406999
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Urban Institute
Keyword(s): Ethnic Groups/Ethnicity; Family Characteristics; Poverty; Racial Differences; Transition, Welfare to Work; Welfare

To provide insights into what states may need to do to help low-skilled women make the transition from welfare to work, the author examined the characteristics and employment patterns of low-skilled women who achieved steady employment by their late twenties. Data for this analysis are from the National Longitudinal Study of Youth. The paper discusses current research on this topic, employment outcomes for low-skilled women, paths to steady employment, family characteristics associated with steady employment, and the implications for welfare reform.
Bibliography Citation
Pavetti, Ladonna Ann. "Against The Odds: Steady Employment Among Low-Skilled Women." Report, Urban Institute, Washington, D.C., July 1, 1997.
4. Pavetti, Ladonna Ann
How Much More Can They Work? Setting Realistic Expectations for Welfare Mothers
Report to the Annie E. Casey Foundation, The Urban Institute, Washington DC, July 1997.
Also: http://www.urban.org/publications/406998.html
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Urban Institute
Keyword(s): Aid for Families with Dependent Children (AFDC); Assets; Children; Employment; Family Income; Income Level; Mothers; Mothers, Income; Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF); Welfare; Women; Work Experience

The social safety net for low-income families is currently undergoing a radical transformation. For the last 61 years, families with children with limited income and assets were entitled to ongoing cash assistance from the Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) program. Now,in a rapidly growing number of states, families with limited income or assets can only receive cash assistance if they agree to look for work or work in exchange for the receipt of government assistance. This transformation of the social safety net for low-income families with children began with the implementation of numerous state welfare reform demonstration projects. 1 The shift was codified into federal law with the passage of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA) of 1996. PRWORA eliminated the AFDC program and replaced it with a block grant to states to establish a Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program. Although PRWORA provides states with considerable flexibility to decide what support they will provide to families in need of assistance, TANF is clearly intended to emphasize short-term, employment-related assistance.
Bibliography Citation
Pavetti, Ladonna Ann. "How Much More Can They Work? Setting Realistic Expectations for Welfare Mothers." Report to the Annie E. Casey Foundation, The Urban Institute, Washington DC, July 1997.
5. Pavetti, Ladonna Ann
The Dynamics of Welfare and Work: Exploring The Process By Which Women Work Their Way Off Welfare
Ph.D. Dissertation, The John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, May, 1993
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: UMI - University Microfilms, Bell and Howell Information and Learning
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); High School Completion/Graduates; High School Dropouts; Mothers, Income; Parents, Single; Skills; Welfare; Women's Studies; Work Experience; Work Reentry

In this research, I use quantitative data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) and qualitative data from extensive interviews with working and non-working low-income single mothers in the Boston area to conduct an in-depth analysis of the dynamics of welfare and work. I find that, contrary to popular belief, many women on welfare are quite willing to work. However, work provides a permanent exit from welfare for a relatively small percentage of women who ever enter the welfare system. When using monthly data, I find that work is the most common reason why women leave the welfare rolls, accounting for 45 percent of all exits from welfare. The majority of these exits occur rapidly--60 percent of women who leave welfare for work do so within a year after beginning a spell of welfare. However, many of these exits end just as quickly as they begin. About 40 percent of all women who leave welfare for work return to welfare within the first year after leaving. By the end of five years, two-thirds of all women who leave welfare for work will have returned to the welfare system. When I examine the experiences of a beginning cohort of recipients and account for multiple spells of welfare receipt, I find that only about 30 percent of women will leave welfare for a work exit that lasts for two years or longer by the end of the five-year period beginning with their initial welfare receipt. Another 30 percent manage to leave welfare for a relatively permanent exit through means other than work. The remaining 40 percent never leave the welfare rolls or leave only for short periods of time and then return. Many of the women who stay on welfare for long periods of time appear to do so because their labor market prospects are so grim. These women have a very poor mastery of basic skills as measured by the Armed Forces Qualifying Test (AFQT); fewer than half complete high school. In addition, very few enter the welfare system with any recent work experience. Copyright Dissertation Abstracts.
Bibliography Citation
Pavetti, Ladonna Ann. The Dynamics of Welfare and Work: Exploring The Process By Which Women Work Their Way Off Welfare. Ph.D. Dissertation, The John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, May, 1993.
6. Pavetti, Ladonna Ann
Acs, Gregory P.
Moving Up, Moving Out or Going Nowhere? A Study of the Employment Patterns of Young Women and the Implications for Welfare Mothers
Report, Washington DC, The Urban Institute, October, 1996.
Also: http://www.urban.org/url.cfm?ID=406697
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Urban Institute
Keyword(s): Aid for Families with Dependent Children (AFDC); Educational Returns; Employment, History; Job Patterns; Mobility, Job; Transitional Programs; Wage Growth; Wages, Women; Welfare; Work Experience

The welfare reform bill passed by the 104th Congress and signed by President Clinton represents an ambitious attempt to eliminate long-term dependence on public aid. The success of the Personal Responsibility and Opportunities for Work Reconciliation Act (PROWRA) rests on the ability to move women off the welfare roles and into jobs. Conventional wisdom holds that women on welfare will be better off in the long run if they take a job, any job, even if it means having less money to spend on their and their children's needs. Underlying this thinking is the belief that women who take low paying jobs will eventually move up to higher paying jobs either with their current employers or by changing employers. To investigate the employment patterns of young women, we use data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY). We construct quarterly employment histories for all the women in our sample beginning at age 19 and continuing through age 27. For each quarter, we determine whether a woman holds (1) a good job (a job paying at least $8/hour for at least 35 hours a week); (2) a bad job, (3) no job but does not receive welfare; or (4) no job and receives welfare. We then examine the probabilities of moving from one employment state to another over time.
Bibliography Citation
Pavetti, Ladonna Ann and Gregory P. Acs. "Moving Up, Moving Out or Going Nowhere? A Study of the Employment Patterns of Young Women and the Implications for Welfare Mothers." Report, Washington DC, The Urban Institute, October, 1996.
7. Pavetti, Ladonna Ann
Acs, Gregory P.
Moving Up, Moving Out, or Going Nowhere? A Study of the Employment Patterns of Young Women and the Implications for Welfare Mothers
Journal of Policy Analysis and Management 20,4 (Autumn 2001): 721-736.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/pam.1025/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Wiley Online
Keyword(s):

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Conventional wisdom holds that women on welfare will be better off in the long run if they take a job, even if it means initially having less money to spend on their and their children needs. Underlying this thinking is the belief that women who take low-paying jobs will eventually move up to higher paying jobs either with their current employer or by changing employers. This paper examines the employment transitions of young women focusing oil the likelihood that women who turn to the welfare system for support will make the transition from low-paying to high-paying jobs. The data are drawn from the National Longitudinal Survey, of Youth (NLSY). Based on the experiences of women who never received welfare, all estimated one-quarter of young women who received welfare could be firmly established in jobs paying more than $9.50 an hour by ages 26 and 27. An additional 40 percent would work steadily but in low-paying jobs, and more than one-third would work only, sporadically. (C) 2001 by the Association for Public Policy, Analysis and Management.
Bibliography Citation
Pavetti, Ladonna Ann and Gregory P. Acs. "Moving Up, Moving Out, or Going Nowhere? A Study of the Employment Patterns of Young Women and the Implications for Welfare Mothers." Journal of Policy Analysis and Management 20,4 (Autumn 2001): 721-736.