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Author: Park, Hyunjoon
Resulting in 4 citations.
1. Gabay-Egozi, Limor
Park, Hyunjoon
Yaish, Meir
A Tale of Two Cohorts: Educational Differentials in Labor Market Outcomes Cumulated over the Early Life Course
Presented: Atlanta GA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2022
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Educational Attainment; Income; Labor Market Outcomes; Unions; Work Histories; Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Literature highlights increasingly prolonged and uncertain processes of transition to adulthood and particularly increased challenge in making transition to stable and regular work, in the context of rising economic inequality and restructuring. Following two NLS cohorts who entered the labor market in 1980s and 2000s, respectively, we compare four key labor market outcomes -- annual income, work hours, numbers of transitions in and out of the labor force, and years covered by union, cumulated between ages 22 and 35. We focus on differences in cumulative outcomes between the more- and less-educated and how the educational gaps differ between two cohorts. The younger cohort, both men and women, cumulates less income, works more hours, has more frequent in/out of the labor force, and has less years covered by union than their older counterpart. Educational gaps are mostly similar between two cohorts or slightly smaller for the younger than older cohort.
Bibliography Citation
Gabay-Egozi, Limor, Hyunjoon Park and Meir Yaish. "A Tale of Two Cohorts: Educational Differentials in Labor Market Outcomes Cumulated over the Early Life Course." Presented: Atlanta GA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2022.
2. Park, Hyunjoon
Sandefur, Gary D.
Racial/Ethnic Differences in Voluntary and Involuntary Job Mobility Among Young Men
Social Science Research 32,3 (September 2003): 347-376.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0049089X02000637
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Academic Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Black Studies; Ethnic Differences; Hispanic Studies; Male Sample; Migration; Minorities; Mobility, Job

Using the 1979-1994 waves of the NLSY-79 data, this study investigates racial/ethnic differences in the rates of voluntary and involuntary job mobility among young men. We find that there is no significant difference among racial/ethnic groups in the likelihood of voluntary job changing. However, blacks do suffer from job instability in that their likelihood of leaving jobs involuntarily is much higher than that of whites or Hispanics. Within the Hispanic population, Mexicans are more likely to experience involuntary job separation compared to whites, though they are not as likely to do so as are blacks. The results confirm the importance of separately analyzing the mechanisms and processes of voluntary and involuntary mobility in order to understand better the disadvantages of some groups in career development.
Bibliography Citation
Park, Hyunjoon and Gary D. Sandefur. "Racial/Ethnic Differences in Voluntary and Involuntary Job Mobility Among Young Men." Social Science Research 32,3 (September 2003): 347-376.
3. Yaish, Meir
Shiffer-Sebba, Doron
Gabay-Egozi, Limor
Park, Hyunjoon
Intergenerational Educational Mobility and Life Course Income Trajectories in the United States
Presented: Austin TX, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2019
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Educational Attainment; Income; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Life Course; Mobility; Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Motivated by a theoretical perspective of the cumulative advantage, we examine intergenerational educational mobility and its consequences for life-course income trajectories. Instead of focusing on the overall educational association between two generations, we classify respondents into four distinctive groups depending on whether their parents and they had college education, respectively: upward and downward mobile, immobile in college and in non-college levels. Then, we link intergenerational educational mobility into life-course income trajectories by comparing how four mobility groups differ in their evolution of income from the age 25 to 50. We apply growth models to two longitudinal data (PSID and NLSY79) of black and white men and women. Preliminary results indicate that educational reproduction is the dominant pattern. Moreover, income trajectories of the four mobility groups have evolved differently over time, resulting in widening inequality over the life course among the groups. Intergenerational educational mobility bears important consequences for income trajectories.
Bibliography Citation
Yaish, Meir, Doron Shiffer-Sebba, Limor Gabay-Egozi and Hyunjoon Park. "Intergenerational Educational Mobility and Life Course Income Trajectories in the United States." Presented: Austin TX, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2019.
4. Yaish, Meir
Shiffer-Sebba, Doron
Gabay-Egozi, Limor
Park, Hyunjoon
Intergenerational Educational Mobility and Life-Course Income Trajectories in the United States
Social Forces published online (22 January 2021): DOI: 10.1093/sf/soaa125.
Also: https://academic.oup.com/sf/advance-article-abstract/doi/10.1093/sf/soaa125/6106216
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Keyword(s): Educational Attainment; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Mobility; Parental Influences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Atheoretical formulation derived from the cumulative advantage literature, that intergenerational educational mobility has enduring life-course income effects above and beyond individuals' education, is empirically tested. This formulation contrasts sharply with both the human capital model, which does not consider parental education as a determinant of children's income, and the sociological research on social mobility, which mostly relies on a snapshot view to study the economic consequences of educational mobility. To test this theory, we use NLSY79 survey data (with Panel Study of Income Dynamics data serving for robustness checks). We apply growth models to the data to estimate if and how the different intergenerational educational mobility groups that are produced by the intersection of parental and respondent education shape life-course income trajectories. Results provide evidence in support of the argument that the intersection of parental and respondent education bears important long-term income consequences, mainly for men. These results, moreover, do not vary by race. We discuss the theoretical and policy implications of our results.
Bibliography Citation
Yaish, Meir, Doron Shiffer-Sebba, Limor Gabay-Egozi and Hyunjoon Park. "Intergenerational Educational Mobility and Life-Course Income Trajectories in the United States." Social Forces published online (22 January 2021): DOI: 10.1093/sf/soaa125.