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Author: Osterman, Paul
Resulting in 4 citations.
1. Osterman, Paul
Is There a Problem with the Youth Labor Market and If So How Should We Fix It?: Lessons for the U. S. from American and European Experience
Working Paper, Sloan School, MIT, Cambridge MA, February, 1992
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Sloan School of Management, MIT
Keyword(s): Inner-City; Job Training; Manpower Programs; Manpower Research; Poverty

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The employment difficulties facing American youth have long been at the center of labor market policy. In the early 1960's the initial emphasis of the Manpower Development and Training Act upon "mainstream" adults was quickly shifted to a focus on inner city youth. Much, if not most, of the job training associated with the War on Poverty aimed at youth with Neighborhood Youth Corp, the Job Corp, and the summer jobs program leading the way. In recent years youth have had to compete with welfare recipients for resources but young workers still receive a disproportionate fraction of attention nd funding. Although often characterized as youth programs in fact these interventions were more specialized and were typically aimed at poor, often minority, youth.
Bibliography Citation
Osterman, Paul. "Is There a Problem with the Youth Labor Market and If So How Should We Fix It?: Lessons for the U. S. from American and European Experience." Working Paper, Sloan School, MIT, Cambridge MA, February, 1992.
2. Osterman, Paul
Labor Market for Young Men
Ph.D. Dissertation, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1976
Cohort(s): Young Men
Publisher: UMI - University Microfilms, Bell and Howell Information and Learning
Keyword(s): Discrimination, Age; Employment; Mobility, Job; Schooling; Unemployment; Work Attitudes

This report studies the operation of the labor market for young men. The research consists of interviews with employers, young workers, and youth workers as well as analysis based on the NLS survey of Young Men. The report seeks to integrate a theory of the nature and impact of adolescent development on labor market behavior with a theory of the institutional structure of labor demand. The theories are tested and applied to policy issues such as youth unemployment and labor market discrimination.
Bibliography Citation
Osterman, Paul. Labor Market for Young Men. Ph.D. Dissertation, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1976.
3. Osterman, Paul
Racial Differentials in Male Youth Unemployment
In: Conference Report on Youth Unemployment: Its Measurement and Meaning. Washington DC: U.S. Department of Labor, U.S. GPO, 1978
Cohort(s): Young Men
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Discrimination, Racial/Ethnic; Layoffs; Racial Differences; Unemployment, Youth

This research examines the source of racial unemployment differentials by comparing results of a model of unemployment for black and white youth. The findings display significant racial differences in unemployment which continue even after controlling for various personal characteristics and labor market demand. For blacks, the probability of layoff is not much higher than whites, and blacks are more apt to quit into unemployment. Finally, the consequences of unemployment are examined and the results show that unemployment experience seems to have few long term effects; however, long-term adverse consequences are found for blacks.
Bibliography Citation
Osterman, Paul. "Racial Differentials in Male Youth Unemployment" In: Conference Report on Youth Unemployment: Its Measurement and Meaning. Washington DC: U.S. Department of Labor, U.S. GPO, 1978
4. Osterman, Paul
The Causes of the Worsening Employment Situation of Black Youth
Report, Assistant Secretary for Policy, Evaluation and Research, U.S. Department of Labor, 1979.
Also: http://catalogue.nla.gov.au/Record/5374492
Cohort(s): Young Men
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Current Population Survey (CPS) / CPS-Fertility Supplement; Discrimination, Racial/Ethnic; Job Search; Layoffs; Occupational Aspirations; Quits; Wages, Reservation; Work History

A study was conducted to examine why black youth unemployment has increased and participation rates decreased. The study was conducted in three parts. The first employs l960 and l970 Census data to examine the impact of local labor market structure and changes in the structure upon the employment growth of black and white youth. The second part uses data on individuals from the NLS of Young Men to examine the determinants of spells of unemployment and the duration of those spells. The final part of the study employs a variety of sources to determine whether there is any evidence that racial differences in aspiration or behavior can explain the employment differential. Among the findings of the study was that black employment is more sensitive than that of whites to the industrial composition of the labor market and to competition from adult women. The analysis of individuals found that racial differences in background characteristics can account for only half of the differential in unemployment experience. No evidence is found of important racial differences in aspirations or behavior.
Bibliography Citation
Osterman, Paul. "The Causes of the Worsening Employment Situation of Black Youth." Report, Assistant Secretary for Policy, Evaluation and Research, U.S. Department of Labor, 1979.