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Author: Ofek, Haim
Resulting in 4 citations.
1. Mincer, Jacob
Ofek, Haim
Interrupted Work Careers: Depreciation and Restoration of Human Capital
Journal of Human Resources 17,1 (Winter 1982): 3-24.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/145520
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: University of Wisconsin Press
Keyword(s): Career Patterns; Employment, Intermittent; Human Capital Theory; Immigrants; Migration; Wages; Wives

The quantitative effects and even the existence of a "human capital depreciation" phenomenon have been a subject of controversy in the recent literature. Prior work, however, was largely cross-sectional and the longitudinal dimension, if any, was retrospective. Using longitudinal panel data (on married women in the NLS of Mature Women), we have now established that real wages at reentry are, indeed, lower than at the point of labor force withdrawal; and the decline in wages is greater, the longer the interruption. Another striking finding is a relatively rapid growth in wages after the return to work. This rapid growth appears to reflect the restoration (or "repair") of previously eroded human capital. The phenomenon of "depreciation" and "restoration" is also visible in data for immigrants to the United States. However, while immigrants eventually catch up with and often surpass natives, returnees from the non-market do not fully restore their earnings potential.
Bibliography Citation
Mincer, Jacob and Haim Ofek. "Interrupted Work Careers: Depreciation and Restoration of Human Capital." Journal of Human Resources 17,1 (Winter 1982): 3-24.
2. Mincer, Jacob
Ofek, Haim
The Distribution of Lifetime Labor Force Participation of Married Women: Comment
Journal of Political Economy 87,1 (February 1979): 197-201.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1832218
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
Keyword(s): Schooling; Wages; Wives; Work History

Two important corollaries of our finding are: (1) in the analysis of long-term (cohort or "lifetime") labor supply of married women corner phenomena are negligible; and (2) even though their current participation rate is 100 percent, married women observed working in a given survey cannot be viewed as permanent labor force participants in the same way as other groups (say adult men) whose average participation rate in the survey is close to 100 percent. Variation in length of previous work experience among currently working married women is quite large. This variation among married women is an important factor in their wage dispersion, and the shorter average work experience is a factor in producing an average wage which is less than the average wage of men or of single women.
Bibliography Citation
Mincer, Jacob and Haim Ofek. "The Distribution of Lifetime Labor Force Participation of Married Women: Comment." Journal of Political Economy 87,1 (February 1979): 197-201.
3. Ofek, Haim
Santos, Fredricka P.
Intergenerational Transfers and the Economic Attainment of Women: A Comparative Analysis of the Parental Role
Report No. 16, Center for the Social Sciences, Columbia University, 1978
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: Center for the Social Sciences, Columbia University
Keyword(s): Earnings; Family Background; Fathers, Influence; Husbands, Income; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Schooling; Transfers, Family; Transfers, Parental

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Attempts to disentangle the effects of basic retrospective inputs associated with the economic achievement of mature women and to estimate them empirically use a conceptual framework largely guided by the consideration that, in addition to external factors (cultural, social, biological, etc.), investment in schooling results from optimizing estimation of parental effects, their separation from the effects of schooling, and the attempt to draw inferences about their relative size--all posing theoretical and statistical problems which are not trivial. Dealing with these problems in some detail, the first part of the paper has prescribed workable empirical tests based on a consistent estimation procedure. This procedure is implemented in the second part of the paper by testing Marchall's hypotheses (as to the rank impact of the parents on child development) against actual data from the NLS of Mature Women (ages 37-51 in 1974).
Bibliography Citation
Ofek, Haim and Fredricka P. Santos. "Intergenerational Transfers and the Economic Attainment of Women: A Comparative Analysis of the Parental Role." Report No. 16, Center for the Social Sciences, Columbia University, 1978.
4. Ofek, Haim
Santos, Fredricka P.
The Economic Attainment of Women: A Comparative Analysis of the Parental Role
Economica 46 (November 1979): 427-433.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2553681
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Earnings; Fathers, Influence; Husbands, Income; Mothers, Education; Schooling

This study provides a framework for estimating the differential impact of a woman's mother and father on marriage and work. Using own earnings and husband's earnings as available approximations for these two aspects of feminine success, the relative effects of the parents are estimated. In regard to schooling and husband's income, evidence shows that women are more strongly influenced by their mothers' education than their fathers'; however, the reverse is true for daughters' earning capacity.
Bibliography Citation
Ofek, Haim and Fredricka P. Santos. "The Economic Attainment of Women: A Comparative Analysis of the Parental Role." Economica 46 (November 1979): 427-433.