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Author: Nyarko, Samuel H.
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. Roghani, Ali
Nyarko, Samuel H.
Potter, Lloyd
Smoking Cigarettes, Marijuana, and the Transition to Marriage among Cohabiters in the USA
Global Social Welfare published online (5 May 2021): DOI: 10.1007/s40609-021-00211-w.
Also: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s40609-021-00211-w
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Cohabitation; Drug Use; Marital History/Transitions; Smoking (see Cigarette Use)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Many studies have established that married people have lower rates of smoking than singles and cohabiters. However, there is still limited research showing whether this advantage also applies specifically to cohabiters before marriage. Hence, this study examines the association between cigarette and marijuana smoking and the transition to marriage among cohabiters in the USA. This study employs data from seventeen waves of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997. Discrete-time logistic regression models are used to test whether lower rates of cigarette and marijuana smoking among cohabiters are associated with the transition to marriage. Results indicate that lower levels of marijuana and cigarette smoking are associated with the transition to marriage among male and female cohabiters. Not smoking cigarettes and marijuana is associated with a significantly higher odds of transition to marriage for both sexes. The findings show that smoking status may play a significant role in the odds of getting married during cohabitation. Pro-marital policies can focus on addressing smoking habits among cohabiters.
Bibliography Citation
Roghani, Ali, Samuel H. Nyarko and Lloyd Potter. "Smoking Cigarettes, Marijuana, and the Transition to Marriage among Cohabiters in the USA." Global Social Welfare published online (5 May 2021): DOI: 10.1007/s40609-021-00211-w.
2. Roghani, Ali
Nyarko, Samuel H.
Sparks, Corey
The First Family Formation among Young Americans: The Role of Family Process
SN Social Sciences 1,50 (2021): DOI: 10.1007/s43545-020-00045-x.
Also: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s43545-020-00045-x
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Age at First Marriage; Family Formation; Family Process Measures; Marital Status; Parent Supervision/Monitoring; Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The percentage of young American adults living with their parents is said to have increased steadily over the last few decades. However, limited research has examined the role of parent-adolescent interaction in the first family formation of young adults. This study examines the association between adolescents' family process and their first union formation (marriage and cohabitation) from the ages of 16 to 35. This study also tests whether the influence of the family process varies significantly by age. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997, an event history analysis was conducted to address how the mechanisms of social learning by family affect the timing and types of first union formation. The results indicate that individuals with a positive family process have a lower risk of cohabitating during adolescence and a higher chance of transitioning to marriage than cohabitation in their first union formation. The findings also show that a positive family process is associated with higher chances of marriage in the mid-twenties and later. The study further shows that fathers may have a substantial role to play in affecting the timing and types of first union formation of their children compared to mothers. The findings of this study suggest that family processes are important in determining the timing and type of first union formation among young people in the United States.
Bibliography Citation
Roghani, Ali, Samuel H. Nyarko and Corey Sparks. "The First Family Formation among Young Americans: The Role of Family Process." SN Social Sciences 1,50 (2021): DOI: 10.1007/s43545-020-00045-x.