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Author: Nofziger, Stacey
Resulting in 5 citations.
1. Nofziger, Stacey
How Well Can a Childhood Measure of Self-Control Predict Deviance Across Time?
Presented: Los Angeles, CA, Annual Meeting of the American Society of Criminology, November 2006
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: American Society of Criminology
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Birth Order; Crime; Discipline; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Injuries; Mothers, Behavior; Parent Supervision/Monitoring; Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness; Punishment, Corporal; Risk-Taking; Scale Construction; Self-Regulation/Self-Control; Smoking (see Cigarette Use); Substance Use; Temperament

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Since the publication of Gottfredson and Hirschi's General Theory of Crime (1990), self-control theory has been rigorously investigated. A recent meta-analysis (Pratt and Cullen 2000) found that in spite of the multiple ways researchers have measured the core concept, different types of samples, and both cross-sectional and longitudinal research strategies, this theory does significantly predict a wide range of juvenile and adult behaviors. One important argument in this theory is that the characteristic of self-control develops early in life and remains relatively stable throughout the life course. This study examines whether this premise is supported by using a measure of self-control from early childhood to predict several forms of criminal and analogous behaviors across time. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth � Child and Young Adult Sample (NLSY-CYA) this study measures the self-control of children when they are 5 or 6 years old. This measure of self-control is then used to predict juvenile delinquency at various ages, including drug and alcohol use and early or unsafe sexual behaviors, as well as deviant activities at older ages.
Bibliography Citation
Nofziger, Stacey. "How Well Can a Childhood Measure of Self-Control Predict Deviance Across Time?" Presented: Los Angeles, CA, Annual Meeting of the American Society of Criminology, November 2006.
2. Nofziger, Stacey
The "Cause" of Low Self-Control
Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency 45,2 (May 2008): 191-223.
Also: http://jrc.sagepub.com/content/45/2/191.abstract
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Birth Order; Crime; Discipline; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Injuries; Mothers, Behavior; Parent Supervision/Monitoring; Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness; Parenting Skills/Styles; Punishment, Corporal; Risk-Taking; Scale Construction; Self-Regulation/Self-Control; Smoking (see Cigarette Use); Substance Use

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Self-control theory is one of the most tested theories within the field of criminology. However, one of the basic assumptions of the theory has remained largely ignored. Gottfredson and Hirschi stated that the focus of their general theory of crime is the "connection between the self-control of the parent and the subsequent self-control of the child" (1990:100). However, no study to date has specifically tested this relationship. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, this study finds that mothers with low self-control do indeed produce children with lower self-control. To begin to understand the mechanism responsible for this relationship, several parenting practices used by the mothers are examined. The analysis shows that the self-control of the mother influences her choice of punishments, as well as having moderate impacts on how she supervises her children. In turn, higher supervision and several choices of punishments affect the development of self-control in the child. This study therefore provides support for a vital, yet previously unexamined, piece of the general theory of crime. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] One of the most extensively debated and empirically tested theories in criminology is Gottfredson and Hirschi's general theory of crime (1990). However, one basic assertion of the theory has not been tested. Gottfredson and Hirschi specifically state that "the major 'cause' of low self-control thus appears to be ineffective child-rearing" (1990: 97). If parents fail to instill self-control within their children, delinquency is likely to result. Producing self-control in children requires a great deal of consistent effort. It is expected that parents who lack self-control will not be particularly adept at instilling self-control in their children (Gottfredson and Hirschi 1990: 101). Surprisingly, the crucial role of parental self-control in the development of juvenile self-control, and ultimately juvenile delinquency, has not been examined.

(Author summary: This project will use the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth – Child and Young Adult data to begin to fill this void. These data include information from the females who were part of the original NLSY79 cohort as well as from their children. A measure of the mothers' self-control is developed using items such as their aspirations, their involvement in criminal activities, early and unsafe sexual activity, and alcohol and substance use. The children's self-control is measured by items such as being in an accident or having an injury in the last year, the children's scores from interviewer assessments on temperament, social development, and behavior problems scales, self-reported behavior problems at school, educational expectations, and a series of items assessing risk taking behaviors and attitudes.)

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Bibliography Citation
Nofziger, Stacey. "The "Cause" of Low Self-Control." Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency 45,2 (May 2008): 191-223.
3. Nofziger, Stacey
The "Cause" of Low Self-Control: Testing the Relationship Between Mothers' and Children's Self-Control
Presented: Toronto, ON, Annual Meeting of the American Society of Criminology, November 2005
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: American Society of Criminology
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Birth Order; Crime; Discipline; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Injuries; Mothers, Behavior; Parent Supervision/Monitoring; Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness; Punishment, Corporal; Risk-Taking; Scale Construction; Self-Regulation/Self-Control; Smoking (see Cigarette Use); Substance Use

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

One of the most extensively debated and empirically tested theories in criminology is Gottfredson and Hirschi's general theory of crime (1990). However, one basic assertion of the theory has not been tested. Gottfredson and Hirschi specifically state that "the major 'cause' of low self-control thus appears to be ineffective child-rearing" (1990: 97). If parents fail to instill self-control within their children, delinquency is likely to result. Producing self-control in children requires a great deal of consistent effort. It is expected that parents who lack self-control will not be particularly adept at instilling self-control in their children (Gottfredson and Hirschi 1990: 101). Surprisingly, the crucial role of parental self-control in the development of juvenile self-control, and ultimately juvenile delinquency, has not been examined. This project will use the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth – Child and Young Adult data to begin to fill this void. These data include information from the females who were part of the original NLSY79 cohort as well as from their children. A measure of the mothers' self-control is developed using items such as their aspirations, their involvement in criminal activities, early and unsafe sexual activity, and alcohol and substance use. The children's self-control is measured by items such as being in an accident or having an injury in the last year, the children's scores from interviewer assessments on temperament, social development, and behavior problems scales, self-reported behavior problems at school, educational expectations, and a series of items assessing risk taking behaviors and attitudes.
Bibliography Citation
Nofziger, Stacey. "The "Cause" of Low Self-Control: Testing the Relationship Between Mothers' and Children's Self-Control." Presented: Toronto, ON, Annual Meeting of the American Society of Criminology, November 2005.
4. Nofziger, Stacey
Newton, Katherine
Parenting and Self-Control across Three Generations
Presented: New Orleans LA, American Society of Criminology Annual Meeting, November 2016
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: American Society of Criminology
Keyword(s): Children, Behavioral Development; Grandchildren; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Parent Supervision/Monitoring; Parenting Skills/Styles; Self-Control/Self-Regulation

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

According to self-control theory, the primary means of developing self-control is through good parenting practices. While some recent work has pointed to potential biological patterns in self-control, most studies find that different monitoring and discipline practices are crucial components for instilling self-control in children. This study examines how self-control is connected to parenting over three generations. Using data from the NLSY79 and the NLSY-CYA, this study examines how self-control of the women in the original cohort influences their parenting styles, which in turn impacts the self-control and later parenting practices of their children, leading finally to differing levels of self-control in their grandchildren.
Bibliography Citation
Nofziger, Stacey and Katherine Newton. "Parenting and Self-Control across Three Generations." Presented: New Orleans LA, American Society of Criminology Annual Meeting, November 2016.
5. Nofziger, Stacey
Newton, Katherine
Self-control, Parental Crime, and Discipline across Three Generations
Deviant Behavior 39,12 (2018): 1533-1551.
Also: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/01639625.2017.1410616
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Keyword(s): Crime; Discipline; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Modeling, Structural Equation; Parental Influences; Parenting Skills/Styles; Self-Control/Self-Regulation

The objective of this study is to examine the relationships between self-control, parental crime, and use of discipline across three generations. Data spanning 30 years from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, are analyzed using Structural Equation Modeling. This study focuses on whether different types of discipline used by parents predict the self-control of each successive generation. We also examine whether self-control and criminal activities of parents are predictive of parenting and resulting self-control of children. We find that discipline has a weak relationship to self-control but that parental crime and self-control do relate to the self-control of later generations.
Bibliography Citation
Nofziger, Stacey and Katherine Newton. "Self-control, Parental Crime, and Discipline across Three Generations." Deviant Behavior 39,12 (2018): 1533-1551.