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Author: Mouw, Ted
Resulting in 3 citations.
1. Mouw, Ted
Sequences of Early Adult Transitions: How Variable Are They, and Does It Matter?
In: On the Frontier of Adulthood: Theory, Research, and Public Policy. R. Settersten, Jr., F. Furstenberg, Jr., and R. Rumbaut, eds., Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 2005
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
Keyword(s): CESD (Depression Scale); Depression (see also CESD); Educational Attainment; Family Income; First Birth; Gender Differences; Life Course; Nestleaving; Poverty; Transition, Adulthood; Transition, School to Work

In this chapter in On the Frontier of Adulthood, Mouw uses longitudinal data to follow 5,464 youth interviewed in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79) between 1979 and 1998 as they traverse the paths into adulthood. The youth were between ages 16 and 22 in 1979, and were interviewed each year between ages 22 and 35. Mouw examines whether the timing and sequence of these experiences affect later economic and psychological well-being, such as self-reported happiness and depression, family income, poverty, and education.

A longitudinal study examines the sequencing of traditional markers of the transition to adulthood like leaving home, finishing school, entering employment, marrying, and having a child and considers the impact of orderly/disorderly sequences on adult outcomes. Life-history data for persons aged 22 to 35 were taken from the 1979-98 waves of the annual National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. The focus was on how many different pathways to adulthood there are, whether the transition has become less structured over time, and how different pathways affect adult outcomes. Monothetic divisive algorithm was used to divide the data into six pathways that explained 41.6% (males) and 41.8% (females) of the variance in life-course transitions. Although these pathways to adulthood definitely correlate with adult outcomes, the effect was substantially smaller than might be expected, and largely dependent on the time of each transition. It is noted that the pathway to adulthood has little impact on poverty, income, happiness, and depression. The policy implications are discussed.

Bibliography Citation
Mouw, Ted. "Sequences of Early Adult Transitions: How Variable Are They, and Does It Matter?" In: On the Frontier of Adulthood: Theory, Research, and Public Policy. R. Settersten, Jr., F. Furstenberg, Jr., and R. Rumbaut, eds., Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 2005
2. Mouw, Ted
Social Capital and Finding a Job: Do Contacts Matter?
American Sociological Review 68,6 (December 2003): 868-898.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1519749
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Employment; Human Capital; Job Search; Labor Market Outcomes; Occupational Attainment; Social Capital; Social Contacts/Social Network

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Does social capital affect labor market outcomes? The prevalent use of job contacts to find work suggests that "who you know" is an important means of getting a good job. Network theories of social capital argue that well-connected workers benefit because of the job information and influence they receive through their social ties. Although a number of studies have found a positive relationship between measures of social capital and wages and/or occupational prestige, little is known about the causal effect of social networks on labor market outcomes. Four data sets are used to reassess findings on the role of social capital in the labor market. A test of causality is proposed based on the argument that if social capital variables do have a causal effect on job outcomes, then workers with high levels of social capital should be more likely to use contacts to find work, all else being equal. Results suggest that much of the effect of social capital in the existing literature reflects the tendency for similar people to become friends rather than a causal effect of friends' characteristics on labor market outcomes.
Bibliography Citation
Mouw, Ted. "Social Capital and Finding a Job: Do Contacts Matter?" American Sociological Review 68,6 (December 2003): 868-898.
3. Mouw, Ted
Kalleberg, Arne L.
Stepping Stone versus Dead End Jobs: Occupational Pathways out of Working Poverty in the NLSY 1979-2006
Presented: Atlanta GA, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2010
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Current Population Survey (CPS) / CPS-Fertility Supplement; Mobility, Economic; Occupational Prestige; Occupations; Wages

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

In this paper we test for the existence of pathways of upward mobility for low wage workers by studying patterns of intragenerational occupational mobility in the National Longitudinal Study of Youth (NLSY) from 1979-2006. We argue that stepping stone links of upward mobility between specific pairs of occupations can be identified by whether or not the accumulation of experience increases the probability of movement between these occupations. In contrast, a dead end job is one which both pays low wages and where the accumulation of occupational experience reduces the probability of upward mobility. We use two data sets to detect potential stepping stone links between occupations. First, we measure the skill similarity between occupations using data on occupational skill requirements from the O*NET occupational database. Second, we use data on occupational mobility from matched samples of the Current Population Survey (CPS) to identify possible career ladders based on either significant one-way flows between occupations or positive age effects on occupational transitions. We test these links using data on career histories from the NLSY. A key aspect of our approach is an empirical strategy that simultaneously models wage mobility (a dichotomous indicator of low versus high pay) and occupational mobility (among detailed 3-digit occupations). In order to estimate our models with detailed occupations and multiple observations for each individual, we first randomly sample from the choice set of occupations and then use a latent-class conditional logit model (Train 2008) to allow for individual heterogeneity.
Bibliography Citation
Mouw, Ted and Arne L. Kalleberg. "Stepping Stone versus Dead End Jobs: Occupational Pathways out of Working Poverty in the NLSY 1979-2006." Presented: Atlanta GA, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2010.