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Author: Mocan, Naci
Resulting in 3 citations.
1. Altindag, Duha
Cannonier, Colin
Mocan, Naci
The Impact of Education on Health Knowledge
Economics of Education Review 30,5 (October 2011): 792-812.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0272775710001214
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; College Education; Educational Attainment; Health Factors; High School Completion/Graduates; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Scale Construction

The theory on the demand for health suggests that schooling causes health because schooling increases the efficiency of health production. Alternatively, the allocative efficiency hypothesis argues that schooling alters the input mix chosen to produce health. This suggests that the more educated have more knowledge about the health production function and they have more health knowledge. This paper uses data from the 1997 and 2002 waves of the NLSY97 to conduct an investigation of the allocative efficiency hypothesis by analyzing whether education improves health knowledge. The survey design allows us to observe the increase in health knowledge of young adults after their level of schooling is increased by differential and plausibly exogenous amounts. Using nine different questions measuring health knowledge, we find weak evidence that an increase in education generates an improvement in health knowledge for those who ultimately attend college. For those with high school as the terminal degree, no relationship is found between education and health knowledge. These results imply that the allocative efficiency hypothesis may not be the primary reason for why schooling impacts health outcomes.
Bibliography Citation
Altindag, Duha, Colin Cannonier and Naci Mocan. "The Impact of Education on Health Knowledge." Economics of Education Review 30,5 (October 2011): 792-812.
2. Mocan, Naci
Altindag, Duha
Education, Cognition, Health Knowledge, and Health Behavior
European Journal of Health Economics 15,3 (April 2014): 265-279.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10198-013-0473-4
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Cognitive Ability; Disability; Education; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using data from NLSY97, we analyze the impact of education on health behavior. Controlling for health knowledge does not influence the impact of education on health behavior, supporting the productive efficiency hypothesis. Accounting for cognitive ability does not significantly alter the relationship between education and health behavior. Similarly, the impact of education on health behavior is the same between those with and without a learning disability, suggesting that cognition is not likely to be a significant factor in explaining the impact of education on health behavior.
Bibliography Citation
Mocan, Naci and Duha Altindag. "Education, Cognition, Health Knowledge, and Health Behavior." European Journal of Health Economics 15,3 (April 2014): 265-279.
3. Mocan, Naci
Unel, Bulent
Skill-biased Technological Change, Earnings of Unskilled Workers, and Crime
Working Paper No. 17605, National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER), November 2011
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)
Keyword(s): Crime; Current Population Survey (CPS) / CPS-Fertility Supplement; Earnings; Skilled Workers; State-Level Data/Policy; Technology/Technological Changes; Wages

This paper investigates the impact of unskilled workers' earnings on crime. Following the literature on wage inequality and skill-biased technological change, we employ CPS data to create state-year as well as state-year-and (broad) industry specific measures of skill-biased technological change, which are then used as instruments for unskilled workers' earnings in crime regressions. Regressions that employ state panels reveal that technology-induced variations in unskilled workers' earnings impact property crime with an elasticity of -1, but that wages have no impact on violent crime. The paper also estimates, for the first time in this literature, structural crime equations using micro panel data from NLSY97 and instrumenting real wages of young workers. Using state-year-industry specific technology shocks as instruments yields elasticities that are in the neighborhood of -2 for most types of crime, which is markedly larger than previous estimates. In both data sets there is evidence for asymmetric impact of unskilled workers' earnings on crime. A decline in earnings has a larger effect on crime in comparison to an increase in earnings by the same absolute value.
Bibliography Citation
Mocan, Naci and Bulent Unel. "Skill-biased Technological Change, Earnings of Unskilled Workers, and Crime." Working Paper No. 17605, National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER), November 2011.