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Author: Kramer, Amit
Resulting in 5 citations.
1. Kramer, Amit
Unions as Facilitators of Employment Rights: An Analysis of Individuals' Awareness of Parental Leave in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth
Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economy and Society 47,4 (October 2008): 651-658.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1468-232X.2008.00539.x/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Institute of Industrial Relations, University of California, Berkeley
Keyword(s): Benefits; Leave, Family or Maternity/Paternity; Unions

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study considers the role of unions and individual characteristics as facilitators of knowledge among employees concerning labor rights. Labor policy by itself is often meaningless without mechanisms that allow implementation of such policy. Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY), individuals that are entitled to parental leave under the Family and Medical Leave Act but are ignorant of their right were identified. Using longitudinal data from 1992 to 2002, we find that union members' knowledge regarding their rights is better than that of nonunion members. Other individual and work characteristics are also associated with knowledge regarding parental leave rights. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Kramer, Amit. "Unions as Facilitators of Employment Rights: An Analysis of Individuals' Awareness of Parental Leave in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth." Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economy and Society 47,4 (October 2008): 651-658.
2. Kramer, Amit
Chung, Wonjoon
Work Demands, Family Demands, and BMI in Dual-earners Families: A 16-year Longitudinal Study
Journal of Applied Psychology 100,5 (September 2015): 1632-1640.
Also: http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0038634
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Psychological Association (APA)
Keyword(s): Body Mass Index (BMI); Children; Family Income; Family Size; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Work Hours

Many scholars assert that work and family demands are negatively related to individuals' long-term physical health, but few studies have explicitly examined this relationship. Among these exceptions, most have employed a cross-sectional design that is limited in its ability to establish causality. We use body mass index (BMI) that generally increases during one's lifetime as an indicator of physical health, and seek to explore the amount of control individuals may have on this seemingly inevitable progression. Drawing on conservation of resources theory, we propose that an increase in demands--both in the work realm (e.g., the number of work hours) and in the family realm (e.g., the number of spouse work hours)--is likely to speed up the increase of BMI. Using a nationally representative sample of 4,264 individuals who were part of a dual-earner family between 1994 and 2010, we find that a within-person increase in weekly work hours, an increase in spouse weekly work hours, and an increase in the number of children are all related to a small within-person increase of the BMI growth trajectory. Within-person increase in work responsibility demands is related to a small within-person decrease in the BMI growth trajectory. We discuss implications of the relationships between work and family demands and long-term physical health. (PsycINFO Database Record © 2015 APA, all rights reserved)
Bibliography Citation
Kramer, Amit and Wonjoon Chung. "Work Demands, Family Demands, and BMI in Dual-earners Families: A 16-year Longitudinal Study." Journal of Applied Psychology 100,5 (September 2015): 1632-1640.
3. Kramer, Amit
Son, Jooyeon
Who Cares about the Health of Health Care Professionals? An 18-Year Longitudinal Study of Working Time, Health, and Occupational Turnover
Industrial Relations and Labor (IRL) Review 69,4 (August 2016): 939-960.
Also: http://ilr.sagepub.com/content/69/4/939
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: New York State School of Industrial and Labor Relations, Cornell University
Keyword(s): Body Mass Index (BMI); Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Job Satisfaction; Job Turnover; Occupations; Work Hours

Health care workers are employed in a complex, stressful, and sometimes hazardous work environment. Studies of the health of health care workers tend to focus on estimating the effects of short-term health outcomes on employee attitudes and performance, which are easier to observe than long-term health outcomes. Research has paid only scant attention to work characteristics that are controlled by the employer and its employees, and their relationship to employees' long-term physical health and organizational outcomes. The authors use data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) from 1992 to 2010 to estimate the relationships among working time, long-term physical health, job satisfaction, and turnover among health care employees. Using a between- and within-person design, they estimate how within-person changes in work characteristics affect the within-person growth trajectory of body mass index (BMI) over time and the relationship between working-time changes and physical health, and occupational turnover. The study finds that health care employees who work more hours suffer from a higher level of BMI and are more likely to leave their occupation.
Bibliography Citation
Kramer, Amit and Jooyeon Son. "Who Cares about the Health of Health Care Professionals? An 18-Year Longitudinal Study of Working Time, Health, and Occupational Turnover." Industrial Relations and Labor (IRL) Review 69,4 (August 2016): 939-960.
4. Kramer, Karen
Kramer, Amit
At-Home Father Families in the United States: Gender Ideology, Human Capital, and Unemployment
Journal of Marriage and Family 78,5 (October 2016): 1315-1331.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jomf.12327/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Child Care; Current Population Survey (CPS) / CPS-Fertility Supplement; Fathers; Gender Attitudes/Roles; Human Capital; Unemployment

The rising population of stay-at-home fathers is driven by economic conditions, human capital, and changing gender ideology. When unemployment rates increase, women become breadwinners in these families. The growing gender education gap is a crucial factor in spousal work and caregiving arrangements. The authors test these propositions by tracking individuals using data from the National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth and the Current Population Survey. They find that unemployment rates are associated with having both caregiving and unable-to-work stay-at-home father families and that the probability that households choose stay-at-home father arrangements is greater when mothers have more education than fathers. Finally, individual differences in gender ideology have strong effects on the probability that families choose a caregiving stay-at-home father family structure.
Bibliography Citation
Kramer, Karen and Amit Kramer. "At-Home Father Families in the United States: Gender Ideology, Human Capital, and Unemployment." Journal of Marriage and Family 78,5 (October 2016): 1315-1331.
5. Kramer, Karen
Kramer, Amit
Chung, WonJoon
Work Demands, Family Demands, and BMI: A Gendered Experience
Presented: Denver CO, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2012
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Body Mass Index (BMI); Employment; Gender Differences; Household Demand; Stress; Weight; Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Although many scholars believe that work and family demands are negatively related to individual’s long-term physical health only few studies have examined this relationship, mostly using cross-sectional designs. Drawing on gender roles theory the time availability perspective, we propose that the relationship between work demands, family demands, and health stronger for women than for men. Using a nationally representative sample of 4,297 individuals who were contentiously employed between 1994 and 2008 we find that work demands are related to both negative and positive effects on BMI and that working more hours raises women’s, but not men’s, BMI. We discuss theoretical implications of the relationships between work, family and physical health.
Bibliography Citation
Kramer, Karen, Amit Kramer and WonJoon Chung. "Work Demands, Family Demands, and BMI: A Gendered Experience." Presented: Denver CO, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2012.