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Author: Kondo, Ayako
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. Kondo, Ayako
Differential Effects of Graduating during a Recession across Gender and Race
IZA Journal of Labor Economics 4,23 (December 2015): DOI: 10.1186/s40172-015-0040-6.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1186/s40172-015-0040-6
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Economic Changes/Recession; Gender Differences; Geocoded Data; High School Completion/Graduates; Modeling, Instrumental Variables; Racial Differences; State-Level Data/Policy; Unemployment Rate; Wages

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study examines the differential effects of the unemployment rate at labor market entry, defined as the time of leaving school, on subsequent wages across gender and race using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 79. Results suggest that the negative effect of a recession at entry on wages is weaker for women. The differences between blacks and whites are not statistically significant for both genders. These results are robust to controlling for the endogenous timing and location of entry, using an instrumental variable based on the predicted year of graduation and the state of residence at age 14.
Bibliography Citation
Kondo, Ayako. "Differential Effects of Graduating during a Recession across Gender and Race." IZA Journal of Labor Economics 4,23 (December 2015): DOI: 10.1186/s40172-015-0040-6.
2. Kondo, Ayako
Munasinghe, Lalith Roshan
Sethi, Rajiv
Racial Disparities in Neighborhood Affluence: Implications for the Test Scores of Children
Working Paper, Department of Economics, Columbia University, September 17, 2006.
Also: http://www.columbia.edu/~rs328/scores.pdf
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Department of Economics, Columbus University
Keyword(s): Geocoded Data; Neighborhood Effects; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

American cities are characterized by sharp racial differences in the extent to which affluent individuals have affluent neighbors. We examine the possibility that this might help account for racial disparities in the test scores of children. We examine performance on the mathematics component of the PIAT (Peabody Individual Achievement Test), which has been administered to the children of mothers in the NLSY sample over the past two decades. We use Census data to compute, for each child, an expected value of neighborhood affluence, conditional on their race, net family income, and county of residence. We find neighborhood affluence is positively correlated with the child's score, and highly significant, despite the inclusion of a host of family and individual characteristics.
Bibliography Citation
Kondo, Ayako, Lalith Roshan Munasinghe and Rajiv Sethi. "Racial Disparities in Neighborhood Affluence: Implications for the Test Scores of Children." Working Paper, Department of Economics, Columbia University, September 17, 2006.