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Author: Kingson, Eric R.
Resulting in 7 citations.
1. Kingson, Eric R.
Critique of Early Retirement Study Disputed
Aging and Work 5,2 (Spring 1982): 93-110
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: National Council on the Aging
Keyword(s): Benefits, Disability; Early Retirement; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Mortality; Pensions; Retirement; Social Security

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This article responds to a critique (Myers, l982) challenging the research findings published in Aging and Work (Kingson, l98l) that indicate a significant portion of men withdraw from the labor force before age 62 due to health problems, but without receiving disability benefits. The critique also argues that findings from the various studies showing poor health to be an important contributing factor to retirement before age 65 are not necessarily valid. The critique is rejected because: (l) it fails to recognize that conclusions published in the Aging and Work article are based on several health indicators--not simply mortality findings; (2) it fails to acknowledge that its central criticism--the possibility of a fallacy of aggregation which invalidates the mortality findings--was accounted for in the original analysis; and (3) the hypothetical model developed to illustrate the inconclusiveness of the findings is based on questionable and often unsubstantiated assumptions.
Bibliography Citation
Kingson, Eric R. "Critique of Early Retirement Study Disputed." Aging and Work 5,2 (Spring 1982): 93-110.
2. Kingson, Eric R.
Disadvantaged Very Early Labor Force Withdrawal
Pamphlet No 6172-80, Policy Issues for the Elderly Poor. Washington, DC: Community Services Administration, 1980: pp. 23-30
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: Community Services Administration
Keyword(s): Benefits, Disability; Early Retirement; Family Resources; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Pensions; Retirees; Retirement; Social Security

The author summarizes findings based on interviews conducted between l966 and l976 concerning the health and incomes of men who leave work before age 62 and cites the most significant as: (1) unhealthy very early retirees (VERs) who do not receive disability benefits die at a greater rate than Disabled VERs who do receive disability insurance benefits; (2) by most measures the health of Disabled and Unhealthy VERs is more similar than dissimilar; and (3) a very large proportion of Disabled and Unhealthy VERs are dead by l975. These findings suggest that the reported health limitations of Disabled and Unhealthy VERs are real and that a clear inequity exists between the treatment of these two groups. The major implication of the health findings is that the Social Security disability may be excluding a large portion of Unhealthy VERs who have a legitimate claim to benefits. The same may be true of the SSI disability program.
Bibliography Citation
Kingson, Eric R. Disadvantaged Very Early Labor Force Withdrawal. Pamphlet No 6172-80, Policy Issues for the Elderly Poor. Washington, DC: Community Services Administration, 1980: pp. 23-30.
3. Kingson, Eric R.
Health of Very Early Retirees
Social Security Bulletin 45,9 (September 1982): 3-9
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: Social Security Administration
Keyword(s): Benefits, Insurance; Early Retirement; Health Factors; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Mortality; Retirees; Retirement; Social Security

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study examines the health of a sample representative of 1.8 million men aged 45-59 in l969 who permanently withdrew from the labor force before age 62 between l966-l975. The analysis concentrates on comparing the health of men receiving Social Security disability benefits with that of men reporting work-limiting health conditions at labor force withdrawal but not receiving Social Security disability benefits. The data suggest that the health of these groups is more similar than dissimilar.
Bibliography Citation
Kingson, Eric R. "Health of Very Early Retirees." Social Security Bulletin 45,9 (September 1982): 3-9.
4. Kingson, Eric R.
Involuntary Early Retirement
Journal of the Institute for Socioeconomic Studies 6 (Autumn 1981): 27-39
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: Institute for Socioeconomic Studies
Keyword(s): Benefits, Disability; Disabled Workers; Early Retirement; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Retirement; Social Security; Unemployment

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The author suggests that the early retirement phenomenon is actually composed of two trends, one voluntary and the other involuntary. He suggests that chronic unemployment in the American economy may be viewed as the major reason for widespread early voluntary retirement and suggests that most early retirements are involuntary. If policy proposals to raise the Social Security retirement age and cut back on early retirement benefits are enacted that do not reflect these aspects of the early retirement phenomenon, he suggests that Social Security costs will be lowered at the expense of some of the most vulnerable future recipients-partially disabled older workers who are not competitive in a high unemployment economy.
Bibliography Citation
Kingson, Eric R. "Involuntary Early Retirement." Journal of the Institute for Socioeconomic Studies 6 (Autumn 1981): 27-39.
5. Kingson, Eric R.
Men Who Leave Work Before Age 62: A Study of Advantaged and Disadvantaged Very Early Labor Force Withdrawal
Ph.D. Dissertation, Brandeis University, 1979
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: UMI - University Microfilms, Bell and Howell Information and Learning
Keyword(s): Early Retirement; Family Resources; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Pensions; Retirement; Social Security

The study is focused on men who leave work before age 62--very early withdrawees. At the time of labor force departure, these men are not eligible to receive Social Security retirement benefits (Old Age Insurance)--the age of earliest eligibility being 62. The qualitative aspect of the study examines the role played by historical factors in shaping the early retirement phenomenon. The empirical analysis uses data collected as part of the NLS of Older Men.
Bibliography Citation
Kingson, Eric R. Men Who Leave Work Before Age 62: A Study of Advantaged and Disadvantaged Very Early Labor Force Withdrawal. Ph.D. Dissertation, Brandeis University, 1979.
6. Kingson, Eric R.
The Retirement Circumstances of Very Early Retirees: A Life Cycle Perspective
Aging and Work 4,3 (Summer 1981): 161-174
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: National Council on the Aging
Keyword(s): Control; Duncan Index; Early Retirement; Educational Attainment; Household Income; Job Tenure; Life Cycle Research; Retirees; Retirement

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

A life cycle perspective is applied to an analysis of retirement incomes and control over labor force exit experienced by men who left work before age 62--very early retirees (VERs). Findings suggest events occurring early in a worker's life, and often beyond his control, influence retirement incomes and control over labor force withdrawal. They are consistent with an interpretation that institutional arrangements in society usually lead to differential opportunity tracks, resulting in some VERs experiencing favorable educational and labor force entry opportunities that later translate into higher probabilities of advantageous very early retirement circumstances, while others experience the opposite. Some major policy implications are: (1) preventive measures designed to deal with problems of disadvantaged very early retirees should intervene early in a worker's life; (2) significant solutions to these problems require major adjustments in society's opportunity structure; and (3) it is socially inequitable to reduce Social Security benefits for disadvantaged early retirees. In addition, the life cycle perspective may be useful to understand other aspects of the retirement process.
Bibliography Citation
Kingson, Eric R. "The Retirement Circumstances of Very Early Retirees: A Life Cycle Perspective." Aging and Work 4,3 (Summer 1981): 161-174.
7. Kingson, Eric R.
Scheffler, Richard M.
Aging: Issues and Economic Trends for the 1980s
Inquiry 18 (Fall 1981): 197-213
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: Inquiry: The Journal of Health Care Organization
Keyword(s): Health Care; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Pensions; Retirement; Social Security; Welfare

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper reviews the major economic trends that impact on government programs affecting the elderly. Issues are raised relating to income support programs, retirement trends, and health care for the elderly.
Bibliography Citation
Kingson, Eric R. and Richard M. Scheffler. "Aging: Issues and Economic Trends for the 1980s." Inquiry 18 (Fall 1981): 197-213.