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Author: Kang, Timothy
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. Kang, Timothy
Contemporary Unions and the Age-Crime Curve: Variation across Gender and Race
Presented: Atlanta GA, American Society of Criminology Annual Meeting, November 2018
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: American Society of Criminology
Keyword(s): Age and Ageing; Cohabitation; Crime; Gender Differences; Modeling, Growth Curve/Latent Trajectory Analysis; Unions

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Scholars have argued that marriage can encourage delinquent adolescents to desist from crime and contribute to explaining the declining slope of the "age-crime curve." Yet, cohabitation has become a prominent feature of the transition to adulthood among contemporary young Americans. Family scholars have documented, moreover, that the process of union formation is significantly gendered, and thus may influence criminal behaviour differently for men and women. There also exist significant racial and ethnic differences in rates of crime and the process of union formation. However, little research has examined whether cohabitation can explain the declining slope of the age crime curve across gender or race/ethnicity. Using prospective data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (1997) and growth curve modelling techniques, this study examines whether cohabitation is associated with declines in self-reported criminal offending during the transition to adulthood and whether the deterring influences of cohabitation contribute to explaining the age-crime curve. Further, I examine these patterns across gender and race to assess the relative importance of unions for different groups of contemporary young Americans. The implications of the findings for life-course criminology will be discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Kang, Timothy. "Contemporary Unions and the Age-Crime Curve: Variation across Gender and Race." Presented: Atlanta GA, American Society of Criminology Annual Meeting, November 2018.
2. Kang, Timothy
The Changing Transition to Adulthood for Contemporary Delinquent Adolescents
Presented: Philadelphia PA, American Society of Criminology (ASC) Annual Meeting, November 2017
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: American Society of Criminology
Keyword(s): Delinquency/Gang Activity; Transition, Adulthood

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The transition to adulthood has changed dramatically during the past half-century in the United States. Since the post-WWII era, young adults take more time to achieve traditional markers of social and economic independence. Completing education and achieving career employment usually takes longer, which also delays leaving the parental home for contemporary young adults. Marriage and childbearing are less common, less connected, and often delayed. There are also new features of the contemporary transition to adulthood, such as the rise in cohabitation and increases in higher education. Yet, the ways that relatively disadvantaged youth, particularly delinquent adolescents, transition to adulthood is less well understood. This has important implications for understanding the ways social bonds and informal controls formed during the transition to adulthood influence the desistance process for contemporary young adults. In this paper, I use multichannel sequence analysis on data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 to describe the timing and sequencing of the transition to adulthood for delinquent adolescents and examine whether these patterns can help understand trajectories of offending. I will also contrast their experience to that of the general population and quantify how the transition to adulthood has changed over time for delinquent adolescents.
Bibliography Citation
Kang, Timothy. "The Changing Transition to Adulthood for Contemporary Delinquent Adolescents." Presented: Philadelphia PA, American Society of Criminology (ASC) Annual Meeting, November 2017.