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Author: Jones, Antwan
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. Jones, Antwan
Parental Socioeconomic Instability and Child Obesity
Biodemography and Social Biology 64,1 (May 2018): 15-29.
Also: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/19485565.2018.1449630
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Keyword(s): Body Mass Index (BMI); Modeling, Mixed Effects; Obesity; Parental Influences; Socioeconomic Background; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Using data from the 1986 to 2010 National Longitudinal Study of Youth (NLSY) and the NLSY Child and Young Adult Supplement, this research explores how changes in parental socioeconomic status relate to child obesity over time. Results from linear mixed-effects models indicate that maternal educational gains and maternal employment transitions significantly increased their child’s body mass index (BMI). This finding suggests that mothers who work may have less time to devote to monitoring their child's food intake and physical activity, which places their children at higher risks of becoming overweight or obese over time. Conversely, father’s work transitions and educational gains contribute to decreases in child's BMI. Thus, work instability and increasing educational attainment for the traditional breadwinner of the household corresponds to better child weight outcomes. Results also suggest that there are racial differences in child BMI that remain after adjusting for changes in socioeconomic status, which indicate that the same structural disadvantages that operate to keep minorities in lower social class standings in society also work to hinder minorities from advancing among and out of their social class. Policy implications related to curbing child obesity are discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Jones, Antwan. "Parental Socioeconomic Instability and Child Obesity." Biodemography and Social Biology 64,1 (May 2018): 15-29.
2. Jones, Antwan
Race, Socioeconomic Status, and Health during Childhood: A Longitudinal Examination of Racial/Ethnic Differences in Parental Socioeconomic Timing and Child Obesity Risk
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 15,4 (April 2018): .
Also: https://www.mdpi.com/1660-4601/15/4/728/htm
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: MDPI (Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute)
Keyword(s): Child Health; Family Income; Obesity; Parental Influences; Racial Differences; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Prior research suggests that socioeconomic standing during the early years of life, particularly in utero, is associated with child health. However, it is unclear whether socioeconomic benefits are only maximized at very young ages. Moreover, given the link between socioeconomic status (SES) and race, research is inconclusive whether any SES benefits during those younger ages would uniformly benefit all racial and ethnic groups. Using 1986-2014 data from the National Longitudinal Study of Youth (NLSY79), this study examines the impact of socioeconomic timing on child weight outcomes by race. Specifically, this research investigates whether specific points exist where socioeconomic investment would have higher returns on child health. Findings suggest that both the timing and the type of socioeconomic exposure is important to understanding child weight status. SES, particularly mother's employment and father's education, is important in determining child health, and each measure is linked to weight gain differently for White, Black, and Hispanic children at specific ages. Policies such as granting more educational access for men and work-family balance for women are discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Jones, Antwan. "Race, Socioeconomic Status, and Health during Childhood: A Longitudinal Examination of Racial/Ethnic Differences in Parental Socioeconomic Timing and Child Obesity Risk." International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 15,4 (April 2018): .