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Author: Grogger, Jeffrey
Resulting in 10 citations.
1. Duncan, Brian
Grogger, Jeffrey
Leon, Ana Sofia
Trejo, Stephen J.
New Evidence of Generational Progress for Mexican Americans
NBER Working Paper No. 24067, National Bureau of Economic Research, November 2017.
Also: http://www.nber.org/papers/w24067
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)
Keyword(s): Educational Attainment; Grandparents; Hispanics; Immigrants; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission

U.S.-born Mexican Americans suffer a large schooling deficit relative to other Americans, and standard data sources suggest that this deficit does not shrink between the 2nd and later generations. Standard data sources lack information on grandparents' countries of birth, however, which creates potentially serious issues for tracking the progress of later-generation Mexican Americans. Exploiting unique NLSY97 data that address these measurement issues, we find substantial educational progress between the 2nd and 3rd generations for a recent cohort of Mexican Americans. Such progress is obscured when we instead mimic the limitations inherent in standard data sources.
Bibliography Citation
Duncan, Brian, Jeffrey Grogger, Ana Sofia Leon and Stephen J. Trejo. "New Evidence of Generational Progress for Mexican Americans." NBER Working Paper No. 24067, National Bureau of Economic Research, November 2017.
2. Grogger, Jeffrey
Arrests, Persistent Youth Joblessness, and Black/White Employment Differentials
Review of Economics and Statistics 74,1 (February 1992): 100-106.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2109547
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Harvard University Press
Keyword(s): Arrests; Crime; Employment, Youth; Heterogeneity; Illegal Activities; Racial Differences; Unemployment, Youth

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Economists have long been concerned with the labor market problems of young men. Recently, research has indicated that one-fourth to one-half of all men are active in crime at some point during their youth. Furthermore, joblessness and criminal activity vary similarly by age and race. I analyze two data sets containing arrest and employment information to assess whether criminal activities may underlie persistent joblessness and black/white employment differentials among young men. Two different approaches are taken to control for individual heterogeneity. Arrests generate some persistence in non-employment. Moreover, arrests account for nearly two-thirds of the black/white employment differential in a sample of arrestees, and nearly one-third of the difference in a more general sample.
Bibliography Citation
Grogger, Jeffrey. "Arrests, Persistent Youth Joblessness, and Black/White Employment Differentials." Review of Economics and Statistics 74,1 (February 1992): 100-106.
3. Grogger, Jeffrey
Immigration and Crime Among Young Black Men: Evidence from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth
In: Help or Hindrance?: The Economic Implications of Immigration for African Americans. D. S. Hamermesh and F. D. Bean eds. New York, NY: Russell Sage Foundation, 1998: pp. 322-342
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Russell Sage Foundation
Keyword(s): Black Studies; Black Youth; Crime; Employment; Immigrants

See also, Help or Hindrance? : the Economic Implications of Immigration for African Americans / Daniel S. Hamermesh and Frank D. Bean, eds., in this on-line bibliography.
Bibliography Citation
Grogger, Jeffrey. "Immigration and Crime Among Young Black Men: Evidence from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth" In: Help or Hindrance?: The Economic Implications of Immigration for African Americans. D. S. Hamermesh and F. D. Bean eds. New York, NY: Russell Sage Foundation, 1998: pp. 322-342
4. Grogger, Jeffrey
Incarceration-Related Costs of Early Childbearing
In: Kids Having Kids: Economic Costs and Social Consequences of Teen Pregnancy. R.A. Maynard, ed. Washington, DC: The Urban Institute Press, 1997: pp. 95-143
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Vanderbilt University Press
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Age at First Birth; Childbearing, Adolescent; Deviance; Educational Attainment; Fertility; Illegal Activities; Incarceration/Jail; Maternal Employment; Parents, Single

This chapter begins by presenting descriptive statistics showing that the children of young teen mothers are almost three times as likely to be behind bars at some point in their adolescence or early 20s as are the children of mothers who delayed childbearing. When the analysis controls for a number of important background factors the link between young teen childbearing and incarceration remains, although the extent of the difference is greatly reduced. In a further effort to tease out the effect of teen childbearing per se, the author takes a novel approach to controlling for unobservable characteristics of the mother that may be correlated with her early age at first birth. He uses a comparison group consisting of the subsequent children of mothers who first gave birth as a young teen. The mothers are the same. They are simply older. The link between young teen childbearing and higher incarceration rates among the offspring remains, although its magnitude is further reduced.
Bibliography Citation
Grogger, Jeffrey. "Incarceration-Related Costs of Early Childbearing" In: Kids Having Kids: Economic Costs and Social Consequences of Teen Pregnancy. R.A. Maynard, ed. Washington, DC: The Urban Institute Press, 1997: pp. 95-143
5. Grogger, Jeffrey
Market Wages and Youth Crime
NBER Working Paper No. 5983, National Bureau of Economic Research, March 1997.
Also: http://nber.nber.org/papers/W5983
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)
Keyword(s): Behavior; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Illegal Activities; Time Use; Wage Models; Wage Rates

Youth crime is widespread. To study the effect of market wages on youth crime, I analyze a time-allocation model in which consumers face parametric wages and diminishing marginal returns to crime. Under these assumptions, an individual who works will commit crime if the returns to the first hour of crime exceed his market wage. This decision rule imposes considerable structure on the econometric model, which I estimate using data from the National Longitudinal Survey Youth Cohort. The empirical model provides estimates of the determinants of criminal returns and of the wage responsiveness of criminal participation. Young men's behavior appears to be very responsive to price incentives. My estimates suggest that falling real wages may have been an important determinant of rising youth crime over the past two decades. Moreover, wages explain an important component of the racial differential in criminal participation, and they largely explain the age distribution of crime. Full-text available on-line: Also: http://nber.nber.org/papers/W5983
Bibliography Citation
Grogger, Jeffrey. "Market Wages and Youth Crime." NBER Working Paper No. 5983, National Bureau of Economic Research, March 1997.
6. Grogger, Jeffrey
Market Wages and Youth Crime
Journal of Labor Economics 16,4 (October 1998): 756-791.
Also: http://nber.nber.org/papers/W5983
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
Keyword(s): Delinquency/Gang Activity; Modeling; Wage Differentials; Wages; Youth Problems

To investigate the problem of widespread youth crime, a time allocation model in which consumers face parametric wages and diminishing marginal returns to crime is analyzed. The theory motivates an econometric model that is estimated using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. Estimates suggest that youth behavior is responsive to price incentives and that falling real wages may have been an important determinant of rising youth crime during the 1970s and 1980s. Moreover, wage differentials explain a substantial component of both the racial differential in criminal participation and the age distribution of crime.
Bibliography Citation
Grogger, Jeffrey. "Market Wages and Youth Crime." Journal of Labor Economics 16,4 (October 1998): 756-791.
7. Grogger, Jeffrey
Speech and Wages
Presented: Montreal, Society of Labor Economists World Meeting, June 2015.
Also: http://www.sole-jole.org/15431.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Society of Labor Economists (SOLE)
Keyword(s): Behavior; Paradata; Wages

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Speech is fundamentally human behavior and a topic that has been widely studied. I ask two questions here that have nevertheless received little research attention. The first is whether a worker's speech, in his native language, is related to his wages. The second is whether speech is responsive to economic incentives. To do this I collected audio data, which I transformed and merged to respondents from the NLSY97. The results show that there is a wage premium for mainstream speech that is not explained by education, test scores, family background, or a set of other worker characteristics. The premium is large for workers with more than a high school education and small to non-existent among workers with less schooling. The results suggest that in areas where the mainstream speech premium is higher, at least some speakers are more likely to acquire mainstream speech patterns as children.
Bibliography Citation
Grogger, Jeffrey. "Speech and Wages." Presented: Montreal, Society of Labor Economists World Meeting, June 2015.
8. Grogger, Jeffrey
Speech Patterns and Racial Wage Differences
Presented: Washington, DC, Bureau of Labor Statistics Conference Center, NLSY97 Tenth Anniversary Conference, May 29-30, 2008
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Racial Differences; Wage Gap

Black-white wage gap is persistent. Are there persistent differences between blacks and whites that could help explain that gap?
Bibliography Citation
Grogger, Jeffrey. "Speech Patterns and Racial Wage Differences." Presented: Washington, DC, Bureau of Labor Statistics Conference Center, NLSY97 Tenth Anniversary Conference, May 29-30, 2008.
9. Grogger, Jeffrey
The Effect of Arrests on the Employment and Earnings of Young Men
Quarterly Journal of Economics 110, 1 (February 1995): 51-71.
Also: http://qje.oxfordjournals.org/content/110/1/51.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: MIT Press
Keyword(s): Arrests; Crime; Incarceration/Jail

Many young men commit crime, and many are arrested. I estimate the effect of arrests on the employment and earnings of arrestees, using a large longitudinal data set constructed by merging police records with UI earnings data. I find that the effects of arrests are moderate in magnitude and rather short-lived.
Bibliography Citation
Grogger, Jeffrey. "The Effect of Arrests on the Employment and Earnings of Young Men." Quarterly Journal of Economics 110, 1 (February 1995): 51-71.
10. Grogger, Jeffrey
Ronan, Nick
Intergenerational Effects of Fatherlessness on Educational Attainment and Entry-level Wages
NLS Discussion Paper No. 96-30, Washington DC: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1995.
Also: http://stats.bls.gov/ore/abstract/nl/nl950080.htm
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Children, Academic Development; Children, Well-Being; Divorce; Educational Attainment; Educational Costs; Family Characteristics; Family Structure; Fathers, Absence; Heterogeneity; Human Capital; Parents, Single; Siblings

Final Report to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, September 1, 1995. The objective of this study is to estimate the effects of fatherlessness on the children's educational attainment and entry-level wages. We consider an important methodological issue not addressed by previous researchers: unobserved heterogeneity across families. One can imagine that families vary greatly in a number of ways that are unobservable to the analyst. Moreover, many of these unobservable family characteristics are likely to be correlated both with the probability of divorce and with the well-being of the children. Thus a cross-sectional regression of children's educational attainment on a measure of their childhood family structure fails to identify the effects of living in a fatherless family, because the effects of fatherlessness are confounded with the effects of the family-specific unobservables. We would generally expect such unobserved heterogeneity to lead to exaggerated estimates of the true effects of fatherlessness. We adjust for family-specific unobservables by making within-family comparisons. Drawing on previous research, we specify a child's human capital to depend on the number of years she spends in a single-parent family. Because children enter and leave the family at different times, the duration of a spell of fatherlessness generally will vary among siblings. To eliminate the effects of family-specific unobservables, we difference the data within families, relating differences in human capital to differences in the duration of the fatherless spell. The approach we adopt instead is method-of-moments estimation. We implement this approach by using sibling comparisons to estimate the extent of the measurement error in our retrospective data. The data are taken from the NLSY.
Bibliography Citation
Grogger, Jeffrey and Nick Ronan. "Intergenerational Effects of Fatherlessness on Educational Attainment and Entry-level Wages." NLS Discussion Paper No. 96-30, Washington DC: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1995.