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Author: Finch, Brian
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. Williams, Kristi
Finch, Brian
Adverse Childhood Experiences, Early and Nonmarital Fertility, and Women's Health at Midlife
Presented: Denver CO, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2018
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Age at First Birth; Childbearing, Premarital/Nonmarital; Childhood Adversity/Trauma; Fertility; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We develop and test hypotheses about the influence of adverse childhood experiences on two dimensions of family formation--age and marital status at first birth--and consider whether these dimensions of family formation mediate the effect of childhood adversity on women's midlife health. We further posit that exposure and adaptation to childhood adversity, social processes linked to structural disadvantage, may help to explain U.S. race and class disparities in fertility timing and nonmarital childbearing, both of which have been linked to women's health at midlife. Analysis of 35 years of nationally representative panel data from the National Longitudinal Study of Youth (NLSY79) indicate that exposure to adverse childhood experiences is significantly associated with earlier age at first birth and with greater odds of having a nonmarital first birth. Results further show that age and marital status at first birth significantly mediate the effect of adverse childhood experiences on women's health at midlife.
Bibliography Citation
Williams, Kristi and Brian Finch. "Adverse Childhood Experiences, Early and Nonmarital Fertility, and Women's Health at Midlife." Presented: Denver CO, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2018.
2. Williams, Kristi
Finch, Brian
Adverse Childhood Experiences, Marital History, and Midlife Health
Presented: Austin TX, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2019
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Childhood Adversity/Trauma; Divorce; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Marriage

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) have enduring consequences for health and well-being throughout the life course. We draw on recent evidence that ACEs undermine self-regulation, trust, and the formation of secure intimate ties to posit that ACEs decrease the probability of marriage and increase risk of divorce. Analysis of 35 years of panel data (NLSY79) (n = 5,784) supports the latter hypothesis among white but not black men and women. Importantly, for white women, a substantial portion of the well-established link between divorce and later life health is partly spurious -- explained by the joint effect of ACEs on both marital history and later life health. Controlling for ACEs reduces the estimated effect of divorce on health at age 50 by 25% for white women and 18% for white men. Health differences between the never-married and those in their first marriage at age 50 are not explained by ACEs.
Bibliography Citation
Williams, Kristi and Brian Finch. "Adverse Childhood Experiences, Marital History, and Midlife Health." Presented: Austin TX, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2019.