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Author: Fallick, Bruce C.
Resulting in 5 citations.
1. Carrington, William J.
Fallick, Bruce C.
Do Some Workers Have Minimum Wage Careers?
Monthly Labor Review 124,5 (May 2001): 17-27.
Also: http://www.bls.gov/opub/mlr/2001/05/art2abs.htm
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): College Graduates; Current Population Survey (CPS) / CPS-Fertility Supplement; Demography; High School Completion/Graduates; Minimum Wage; Wage Differentials; Wage Levels

Examines incidence of and proportion of time spent in minimum and near-minimum wage jobs among workers who have finished high school or college; based on the National Longitudinal Study of Youth 1979 (NLSY79); statistical analysis; US. Includes relative incidence of minimum wage jobholding across various demographic groups; in broader context of Current Population Survey (CPS) 1993-94.
Bibliography Citation
Carrington, William J. and Bruce C. Fallick. "Do Some Workers Have Minimum Wage Careers?" Monthly Labor Review 124,5 (May 2001): 17-27.
2. Carrington, William J.
Fallick, Bruce C.
Minimum Wage Careers
NTIS Report PB2000107225, Federal Reserve System, Washington DC: Bureau of Labor Statistics, Aug. 1999
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Disadvantaged, Economically; Employment; Income Level; Legislation; Minimum Wage

This paper investigates the extent to which people spend careers on minimum wage jobs. We find that a small but non-trivial number of National Longitudinal Study of Youth (NLSY) spend 25%, 50% or even 75% of the first ten years of their career on minimum or near-minimum wage jobs. Workers with these minimum wage careers tend to be drawn from groups such as women, blacks, and the less-educated that are generally overrepresented in the low-wage population. The results indicate that lifetime incomes of some workers may be supported by a minimum wage. At the same time, these same groups would be disproportionately affected by any minimum wage-induced disemployment. The results suggest that minimum wage legislation has non-negligible effects on the lifetime opportunities of a significant minority of workers.
Bibliography Citation
Carrington, William J. and Bruce C. Fallick. "Minimum Wage Careers." NTIS Report PB2000107225, Federal Reserve System, Washington DC: Bureau of Labor Statistics, Aug. 1999.
3. Currie, Janet
Fallick, Bruce C.
A Note on the New Minimum Wage Research
NBER Working Paper No. 4348, National Bureau of Economic Research, April 1993.
Also: http://www.nber.org/cgi-bin/wpsearch.pl?action=bibliography&paper=W4348&year=93
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)
Keyword(s): Employment, Youth; Minimum Wage; Wage Rates; Wages

Impact on employment of increases in the federal minimum wage; based on the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth data, 1979-80. Bibliography, table(s).
Bibliography Citation
Currie, Janet and Bruce C. Fallick. "A Note on the New Minimum Wage Research." NBER Working Paper No. 4348, National Bureau of Economic Research, April 1993.
4. Currie, Janet
Fallick, Bruce C.
The Minimum Wage and the Employment of Youth: Evidence from the NLSY
Journal of Human Resources 31,2 (Spring 1996): 404-428.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/146069
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: University of Wisconsin Press
Keyword(s): Employment, Youth; Minimum Wage; Peers/Peer influence/Peer relations; Wage Dynamics; Wage Rates; Wages; Work Hours

Using panel data on individuals from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, the authors find that employed individuals who were affected by the increases in the federal minimum wage in 1979 and 1980 were about 3 percent less likely to be employed a year later, even after accounting for the fact that workers employed at the minimum wage may differ from their peers in unobserved ways.
Bibliography Citation
Currie, Janet and Bruce C. Fallick. "The Minimum Wage and the Employment of Youth: Evidence from the NLSY." Journal of Human Resources 31,2 (Spring 1996): 404-428.
5. Fallick, Bruce C.
Currie, Janet
The Minimum Wage and the Employment of Teenagers. Recent Research
ERIC Document No. ED397242, Clearinghouse No. CE072037, June 1993.
Also: http://www.ssc.wisc.edu/jhr/1996ab/currie2.html
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: ERIC
Keyword(s): Employment, In-School; Employment, Youth; High School; Higher Education; Minimum Wage; Unemployment; Vocational Education

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

A study used individual-level data from the National Longitudinal Study of Youth to examine the effects of changes in the federal minimum wage on teenage employment. Individuals in the sample were classified as either likely or unlikely to be affected by these increases in the federal minimum wage on the basis of their wage rates and industry of employment. An estimation, concentrated on teenagers, showed that workers whose wages were between the old and new minimum wage and whose wages were raised by the increase in the minimum were 3-4 percent more likely to lose their jobs in the following year than individuals not directly affected. Even after controlling for the differences among teenage workers, the study concluded that the simple fact of working at a wage below the new minimum raised the probability of unemployment. (YLB)
Bibliography Citation
Fallick, Bruce C. and Janet Currie. "The Minimum Wage and the Employment of Teenagers. Recent Research." ERIC Document No. ED397242, Clearinghouse No. CE072037, June 1993.