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Author: Faith, Myles S.
Resulting in 4 citations.
1. Allison, David B.
Faith, Myles S.
Nathan, J. S.
Risch's Lambda Values for Human Obesity
International Journal of Obesity 20,11 (November 1996): 990-999.
Also: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8923155
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Nature Publishing Group
Keyword(s): Genetics; Obesity; Pairs (also see Siblings); Sample Selection

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

OBJECTIVE: Risch's lambda statistic (lambda-R)is related to the heritability of traits and can be useful in several contexts, including the conduct of power analyses to determine sample size for gene mapping studies. However, values of lambda-R have not been presented for human obesity. DESIGN AND RESULTS: Using both analytic and empirical approaches, the present study calculates estimates of lambda-R. Examples are provided to illustrate the use of these estimates for determining sample size for genetic mapping studies.
Bibliography Citation
Allison, David B., Myles S. Faith and J. S. Nathan. "Risch's Lambda Values for Human Obesity." International Journal of Obesity 20,11 (November 1996): 990-999.
2. Faith, Myles S.
Heshka, Stanley
Keller, Kathleen, L.
Sherry, Bettylou
Matz, Patty E.
Pietrobelli, Angelo
Allison, David B.
Maternal-Child Feeding Patterns and Child Body Weight: Findings from a Population-Based Sample
Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine 157,9 (September 2003): 926-932.
Also: http://archpedi.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/full/157/9/919
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: American Medical Association
Keyword(s): Body Mass Index (BMI); Child Health; Children, Behavioral Development; Ethnic Differences; Hispanics; Nutritional Status/Nutrition/Consumption Behaviors; Obesity; Racial Differences; Weight

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Objective: Certain mother-child feeding patterns (MCFPs) may promote childhood obesity and/or disordered eating. The objectives of this study were to assess the demographic correlates of select MCFPs and to test whether differences in these MCFPs are associated with child body mass index (BMI: kg/m2) z-scores in a population-based study.

Design: A secondary analysis of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) Main and Child Cohorts was conducted on more than 1,000 Hispanic, African American, and non-Hispanic/non-African American? (NHNAA) children, aged 3?6 years. MCFPs were measured by three interview questions probing mother-allotted child food choice, child compliance during meals, and child obedience during meals.

Results: Mothers of NHNAA children allotted greater food choice than mothers of African American or Hispanic children. Maternal BMI and other demographic measures were unrelated to MCFPs. The lowest levels of mother-allotted child food choice and child eating compliance were associated with reduced child BMI, with mean BMI z-scores = -.36 and -.41 respectively. Effect sizes were small, however, and MCFPs did not discriminate children who were overweight or at-risk for overweight from children who were not (p> .05).

Conclusions: Feeding strategies providing the least child food choice were associated with reduced child BMI. However, feeding relations did not relate to child overweight status.

Bibliography Citation
Faith, Myles S., Stanley Heshka, Kathleen Keller, Bettylou Sherry, Patty E. Matz, Angelo Pietrobelli and David B. Allison. "Maternal-Child Feeding Patterns and Child Body Weight: Findings from a Population-Based Sample." Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine 157,9 (September 2003): 926-932.
3. Faith, Myles S.
Heshka, Stanley
Matz, Patty E.
Pletrobelli, A.
Allison, David B.
Distribution of Maternal Feeding Practices in the United States: Results from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth
Obesity Research 8,Supplement_1 (October 2000): 48s -
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: International Association for the Study of Obesity (IASO)
Keyword(s): Body Mass Index (BMI); Child Health; Ethnic Differences; Family Income; Gender; Hispanics; Obesity; Temperament; Weight

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Maternal overcontrol during feeding is associated with poorer caloric regulation in children and may be a risk factor for childhood obesity. However, studies investigating these associations have relied upon relatively small and primarily Caucasian samples. There are almost no data on the distribution of maternal feeding practices (MFP), especially feeding overcontrol, on a population level. In the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY), a nationally representative and ethnically diverse sample, mothers of children 3 - 6 years old were asked 'How much choice is your child allowed in deciding what foods he/she eats at breakfast and lunch?" Responses ranged from 1 ('A Great Deal") to 4 (`None"). Questions asking about child obedience during feeding were also assessed. We tested whether the distribution of reported MFP varies as a function of child gender, ethnicity, age, maternal body mass index (BMI), and family income. Subjects in the present study were > 1,000 Hispanic, African American, and "non-Hispanic non-African American" (i.e., primarily Caucasian) children of the original NLSY cohort. With respect to the question addressing child choice during eating, analyses indicated a significant ethnicity effect (p<.0001) such that mothers of non-Hispanic/non-African American children were more likely to report allowing their children "great choice" in deciding what foods to eat (32%) compared to mothers of Hispanic (20%) and African American (22%) children. By contrast, mothers of Hispanic (27%) and African American (24%) children were more likely to report allowing "none" or "little" food choice compared to mothers of non-Hispanic/non-African American children (13%). Choice was also related to family income in certain analyses (p<.0001), such that increasing income was associated with increased child food choice. Child gender, maternal BMI, and other demographic variables were not significant. Questions reflecting child obedience during eating did not differ by child gender or ethnicity. In summary, child food choice may be somewhat reduced in Hispanic, African American and poorer families, but unrelated to child gender and maternal BMI. Results appear consistent with certain population-level differences in obesity prevalence and the potential role of feeding overcontrol in childhood obesity onset. (Funded by grants from NIMH & ATPM-CDC).
Bibliography Citation
Faith, Myles S., Stanley Heshka, Patty E. Matz, A. Pletrobelli and David B. Allison. "Distribution of Maternal Feeding Practices in the United States: Results from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth." Obesity Research 8,Supplement_1 (October 2000): 48s - .
4. Faith, Myles S.
Manibay, Elizabeth
Kravitz, Meredyth
Griffith, John
Allison, David B.
Relative Body Weight and Self-Esteem Among African Americans in Four Nationally Representative Samples
Obesity Research 6,6 (November 1998): 430-437.
Also: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9845233
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: International Association for the Study of Obesity (IASO)
Keyword(s): Age and Ageing; Gender Differences; Longitudinal Data Sets; Obesity; Racial Equality/Inequality; Weight

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

OBJECTIVE: Obesity is an increasingly common health problem among African Americans, especially women, in the United States. However, limited data are available on the psychological correlates of obesity in this population. This study examined the association between self-esteem and relative body weight (RBW) in four large nationally representative samples of African American individuals. RESEARCH METHODS AND PROCEDURES: Data from The Adolescent Health Care Evaluation Study, The National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, The High School and Beyond, and The National Survey of Black Americans were analyzed. Within each database, regression analyses tested the association between RBW and self-esteem while adjusting for age and sex. RESULTS: In three of the four databases, there was no significant association between RBW and self-esteem. In the only database detecting a statistically significant effect, the magnitude of the effect was small. The combined effects of RBW and its interact ion with age and sex accounted for <2% of the variance in self-esteem across databases. DISCUSSION: Results suggest that elevated RBW is not associated with a poorer general self-concept, on average, among African American individuals. Copyright: NAASO
Bibliography Citation
Faith, Myles S., Elizabeth Manibay, Meredyth Kravitz, John Griffith and David B. Allison. "Relative Body Weight and Self-Esteem Among African Americans in Four Nationally Representative Samples." Obesity Research 6,6 (November 1998): 430-437.