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Author: Eriksson, Tor
Resulting in 3 citations.
1. Bjorklund, Anders
Bratsberg, Bernt
Eriksson, Tor
Jantti, Markus
Naylor, Robin
Raaum, Oddbjorn
Roed, Knut
Osterbacka, Eva
Intergenerational Earnings Mobility in the Nordic Countries, the United Kingdom and the United States: An Overview
Working Paper, Abo Akademi University, Abo, Finland, 2005.
Also: http://www.creato.no/espe_2004/sider/pdf/osterbacka.pdf
Cohort(s): Older Men, Young Men
Publisher: European Society for Population Economics (ESPE)
Keyword(s): Britain, British; Cross-national Analysis; Denmark, Danish; Fathers and Children; Fathers and Sons; Finland, Finnish; Gender Differences; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Mobility; Mobility, Economic; Norway, Norwegian; Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Also: Presented: Bergen, Norway, European Society for Population Economics, June 2004.

The present paper examines the extent of intergenerational earnings mobility in Denmark, Finland, Norway, and the United States. We examine income mobility among pairs of fathers and sons as well as fathers and daughters using both mobility matrices and regression and correlation coefficients. Our results suggest that while all countries exhibit substantial income persistence across generations, especially in the tails of the distribution, there is greater persistence of rich rather than poor incomes among men, there is less income persistence in the Nordic countries and daughters are more mobile than men.

Bibliography Citation
Bjorklund, Anders, Bernt Bratsberg, Tor Eriksson, Markus Jantti, Robin Naylor, Oddbjorn Raaum, Knut Roed and Eva Osterbacka. "Intergenerational Earnings Mobility in the Nordic Countries, the United Kingdom and the United States: An Overview." Working Paper, Abo Akademi University, Abo, Finland, 2005.
2. Bratsberg, Bernt
Roed, Knut
Raaum, Oddbjorn
Naylor, Robin
Jantti, Markus
Eriksson, Tor
Osterbacka, Eva
Nonlinearities in Intergenerational Earnings Mobility: Consequences for Cross-Country Comparisons
Economic Journal 117,519 (March 2007), C72-C92.
Also: http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1468-0297.2007.02036.x
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Royal Economic Society (RES)
Keyword(s): Britain, British; Cross-national Analysis; Denmark, Danish; Educational Attainment; Family Background; Fathers and Sons; Finland, Finnish; Income Dynamics/Shocks; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Mobility; NCDS - National Child Development Study (British); Norway, Norwegian; Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We show that the patterns of intergenerational earnings mobility in Denmark, Finland and Norway, unlike those for the US and the UK, are highly nonlinear. The Nordic relationship between log earnings of sons and fathers is flat in the lower segments of the fathers earnings distribution – sons growing up in the poorest households have the same adult earnings prospects as sons in moderately poor households – and is increasingly positive in middle and upper segments. This convex pattern contrasts sharply with our findings for the US and the UK, where the relationship is much closer to being linear. As a result, cross-country comparisons of intergenerational earnings elasticities may be misleading with respect to transmission mechanisms in the central parts of the earnings distribution and uninformative in the tails of the distribution.
Bibliography Citation
Bratsberg, Bernt, Knut Roed, Oddbjorn Raaum, Robin Naylor, Markus Jantti, Tor Eriksson and Eva Osterbacka. "Nonlinearities in Intergenerational Earnings Mobility: Consequences for Cross-Country Comparisons ." Economic Journal 117,519 (March 2007), C72-C92.
3. Jantti, Markus
Bratsberg, Bernt
Roed, Knut
Raaum, Oddbjorn
Naylor, Robin
Osterbacka, Eva
Bjorklund, Anders
Eriksson, Tor
American Exceptionalism in a New Light: A Comparison of Intergenerational Earnings Mobility in the Nordic Countries, the United Kingdom and the United States
IZA Discussion Paper No. 1938, The Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), January 2006.
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA)
Keyword(s): Britain, British; Cross-national Analysis; Denmark, Danish; Educational Attainment; Family Background; Fathers and Sons; Finland, Finnish; Income Dynamics/Shocks; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Mobility; NCDS - National Child Development Study (British); Norway, Norwegian; Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We develop methods and employ similar sample restrictions to analyze differences in intergenerational earnings mobility across the United States, the United Kingdom, Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden. We examine earnings mobility among pairs of fathers and sons as well as fathers and daughters using both mobility matrices and regression and correlation coefficients. Our results suggest that all countries exhibit substantial earnings persistence across generations, but with statistically significant differences across countries. Mobility is lower in the U.S. than in the U.K., where it is lower again compared to the Nordic countries. Persistence is greatest in the tails of the distributions and tends to be particularly high in the upper tails: though in the U.S. this is reversed with a particularly high likelihood that sons of the poorest fathers will remain in the lowest earnings quintile. This is a challenge to the popular notion of "American exceptionalism." The U.S. also differs from the Nordic countries in its very low likelihood that sons of the highest earners will show downward "long-distance" mobility into the lowest earnings quintile. In this, the U.K. is more similar to the U.S.
Bibliography Citation
Jantti, Markus, Bernt Bratsberg, Knut Roed, Oddbjorn Raaum, Robin Naylor, Eva Osterbacka, Anders Bjorklund and Tor Eriksson. "American Exceptionalism in a New Light: A Comparison of Intergenerational Earnings Mobility in the Nordic Countries, the United Kingdom and the United States." IZA Discussion Paper No. 1938, The Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), January 2006.