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Author: Edwards, Mark Evan
Resulting in 5 citations.
1. Edwards, Mark Evan
Plotnick, Robert D.
Klawitter, Marieka Marjorie
Do Attitudes and Personality Characteristics Affect Socioeconomic Outcomes? The Case of Welfare Use by Young Women
Social Science Quarterly 82,4 (December 2001): 827-843.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/0038-4941.00062/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Aid for Families with Dependent Children (AFDC); Attitudes; Family Background; Locus of Control (see Rotter Scale); Modeling, Logit; Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES) (see Self-Esteem); Rotter Scale (see Locus of Control); Self-Esteem; Social Environment; Welfare

Objective. We estimate a model of social-psychological determinants of entry into Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC), the primary cash welfare program in the United States until 1996. Methods. Using information from the youngest cohorts of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, we estimate logit models of the probability of ever participating in AFDC and hazard models of the timing until first use of AFDC. Results. We find strong associations between welfare use and several attitudes and personality characteristics, but with two exceptions, most of the associations are not robust to the inclusion of exogenous: background characteristics. There is consistent, strong evidence that positive attitudes toward school lower the likelihood of using welfare and increase duration until first receipt. Family background and social environment characteristics show strong robust effects. Conclusions. Our results point to relatively weak evidence for the hypothesis that individual attitudes in adolescence have a significant impact on initial welfare receipt.
Bibliography Citation
Edwards, Mark Evan, Robert D. Plotnick and Marieka Marjorie Klawitter. "Do Attitudes and Personality Characteristics Affect Socioeconomic Outcomes? The Case of Welfare Use by Young Women." Social Science Quarterly 82,4 (December 2001): 827-843.
2. Klawitter, Marieka Marjorie
Plotnick, Robert D.
Edwards, Mark Evan
Determinants of Initial Entry onto Welfare by Young Women
Journal of Policy Analysis and Management 19,4 (Autumn 2000): 527-546.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/1520-6688%28200023%2919:4%3C527::AID-PAM1%3E3.0.CO;2-4/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Aid for Families with Dependent Children (AFDC); Family Structure; First Birth; Poverty; Racial Differences; Welfare; Women

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using data from the youngest cohorts of women in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, this study constructs Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) histories starting at age 15. Most young women go on AFDC for the first time between ages 18 and 25 and do so in the first few years after the birth of their first baby. These histories are used to estimate models of the determinants of initial use of AFDC. The models provide mixed evidence that the financial or other incentives of welfare policy affect the likelihood and timing of AFDC use. Benefit levels do not seem to affect participation, but the presence of a program for medically needy families who are not on welfare appears to decrease entrance to welfare for some groups. Parental poverty, family structure, academic achievement, attitudes toward school, and race are significantly related to the likelihood of participating in AFDC, and the rate of entry. copyright: 2000 by the Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management.
Bibliography Citation
Klawitter, Marieka Marjorie, Robert D. Plotnick and Mark Evan Edwards. "Determinants of Initial Entry onto Welfare by Young Women." Journal of Policy Analysis and Management 19,4 (Autumn 2000): 527-546.
3. Klawitter, Marieka Marjorie
Plotnick, Robert D.
Edwards, Mark Evan
Determinants of Welfare Entry and Exit by Young Women
Discussion Paper No. 1099-96, Institute for Research on Poverty, University of Wisconsin - Madison, 1996.
Also: http://www.irp.wisc.edu/publications/dps/pdfs/dp109996.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP), University of Wisconsin - Madison
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Aid for Families with Dependent Children (AFDC); Attitudes; Educational Attainment; Family Structure; First Birth; Home Environment; Modeling; Racial Differences; Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES) (see Self-Esteem); Rotter Scale (see Locus of Control); School Characteristics/Rating/Safety; Schooling; Welfare

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using data from the youngest cohorts of women in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, this study constructs AFDC histories starting at age 15. Most young women go on AFDC for the first time between ages 18 and 25 and do so in the first few years after the birth of their first baby. We use these histories to estimate models of the determinants of initial use of AFDC and of the rate of exit from the first AFDC spell. The models show little evidence that welfare benefits affect the likelihood and timing of AFDC use, except that higher Medicaid benefits are associated with slower rates of exit from an initial AFDC spell. Parental welfare receipt, the home educational environment, family structure, academic achievement, attitudes toward school, and race are significantly related to the likelihood of participating in AFDC and the rate of entry and exit.
Bibliography Citation
Klawitter, Marieka Marjorie, Robert D. Plotnick and Mark Evan Edwards. "Determinants of Welfare Entry and Exit by Young Women." Discussion Paper No. 1099-96, Institute for Research on Poverty, University of Wisconsin - Madison, 1996.
4. Plotnick, Robert D.
Klawitter, Marieka Marjorie
Edwards, Mark Evan
Do Attitudes and Personal Characteristics Affect Socioeconomic Outcomes? The Case of Welfare Use by Young Women
Presented: San Francisco, CA, American Sociological Association Annual Meetings, August 1998
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Aid for Families with Dependent Children (AFDC); Attitudes; Family Background; Family Influences; Locus of Control (see Rotter Scale); Modeling, Hazard/Event History/Survival/Duration; Modeling, Logit; Self-Esteem; Welfare

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Develops & estimates a structural model of social-psychological determinants of entry to the Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) program, which holds that attitudes & personality characteristics influence a woman's likelihood of becoming demographically & financially eligible for welfare & her willingness to bear the stigma of receiving benefits. These factors, in turn, affect the likelihood of going on welfare. Data from the youngest cohorts of women in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth are drawn on to estimate logit models of the probability of ever participating in AFDC up to age 25 & hazard models of the timing until first use of AFDC. The attitudes & personality characteristics investigated are self-esteem, locus of control, attitudes toward school, attitudes toward women's work & family roles, commitment to work, & aversion to accepting public assistance. Strong associations are found between welfare use & several attitudes & personality characteristics, but most of the associations are not robust to the inclusion of exogenous personal & family background characteristics. There is consistent, strong evidence that more positive attitudes toward school lower the likelihood of using welfare & increasing duration until first receipt.
Bibliography Citation
Plotnick, Robert D., Marieka Marjorie Klawitter and Mark Evan Edwards. "Do Attitudes and Personal Characteristics Affect Socioeconomic Outcomes? The Case of Welfare Use by Young Women." Presented: San Francisco, CA, American Sociological Association Annual Meetings, August 1998.
5. Plotnick, Robert D.
Klawitter, Marieka Marjorie
Edwards, Mark Evan
Do Attitudes and Personality Characteristics Affect Socioeconomic Outcomes? The Case of Welfare Use by Young Women
Discussion Paper No. 1161-98, Institute for Research on Poverty, University of Wisconsin - Madison, 1998.
Also: http://www.irp.wisc.edu/publications/dps/pdfs/dp116198.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP), University of Wisconsin - Madison
Keyword(s): Aid for Families with Dependent Children (AFDC); Attitudes; Family Background; Family Influences; Locus of Control (see Rotter Scale); Modeling, Hazard/Event History/Survival/Duration; Modeling, Logit; Self-Esteem; Welfare

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We develop and estimate a model of social-psychological determinants of entry to the Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) program, the primary cash welfare program in the United States for 60 years until replaced in 1996. The structural model holds that attitudes and personality characteristics influence a woman's likelihood of becoming demographically and financially eligible for welfare and her willingness to bear the stigma of receiving benefits. These factors, in turn, affect the likelihood of actually going on welfare. We test for a relationship between social-psychological variables and welfare participation using data from the youngest cohorts of women in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. We estimate logit models of the probability of ever participating in AFDC up to age 25 and hazard models of the timing until first use of AFDC. The attitudes and personality characteristics in the empirical model are self-esteem, locus of control, attitudes toward school, att itudes toward women's work and family roles, commitment to work, and aversion to accepting public assistance. We find strong associations between welfare use and several attitudes and personality characteristics, but most of the associations are not robust to the inclusion of exogenous personal and family background characteristics. Consistent, strong evidence suggests that more positive attitudes toward school lower the likelihood of using welfare and increase duration until first receipt.
Bibliography Citation
Plotnick, Robert D., Marieka Marjorie Klawitter and Mark Evan Edwards. "Do Attitudes and Personality Characteristics Affect Socioeconomic Outcomes? The Case of Welfare Use by Young Women." Discussion Paper No. 1161-98, Institute for Research on Poverty, University of Wisconsin - Madison, 1998.