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Author: Domina, Thurston
Resulting in 3 citations.
1. Attewell, Paul
Lavin, David E.
Domina, Thurston
Levey, Tania Gabrielle
Passing the Torch: Does Higher Education for the Disadvantaged Pay Off Across the Generations?
New York, NY: Russell Sage Foundation, 2007
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Russell Sage Foundation
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Children, Academic Development; Children, Poverty; City University of New York (CUNY) Longitudinal Survey 1970-1972; Family Structure; Grandparents; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Mobility, Social; Mothers, Education; Parental Influences; Parental Investments; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Pearlin Mastery Scale; Propensity Scores; Racial Differences; School Progress; Schooling, Post-secondary

See in particular: Chapter 4: Breaking the Cycle of Disadvantage: Maternal Education and Children's Success and Chapter 5. How College Changes a Mother’s Parenting and Affects Her Children’s Educational Outcomes
Bibliography Citation
Attewell, Paul, David E. Lavin, Thurston Domina and Tania Gabrielle Levey. Passing the Torch: Does Higher Education for the Disadvantaged Pay Off Across the Generations? New York, NY: Russell Sage Foundation, 2007.
2. Domina, Thurston
Leveling the Home Advantage: Assessing the Effectiveness of Parental Involvement in Elementary School
Sociology of Education 78,3 (July 2005): 233-249.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4148916
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Children, Academic Development; Elementary School Students; Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness; Parent-School involvement; Parental Influences; Parental Investments; School Characteristics/Rating/Safety; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

In the past two decades, a great deal of energy has been dedicated to improving children's education by increasing parents' involvement in school. However, the evidence on the effectiveness of parental involvement is uneven. Whereas policy makers and theorists have assumed that parental involvement has wide-ranging positive consequences, many studies have shown that it is negatively associated with some children's outcomes. This article uses data from the children of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 to estimate time-lagged growth models of the effect of several types of parental involvement on scores on elementary school achievement tests and the Behavioral Problems Index. The findings suggest that parental involvement does not independently improve children's learning, but some involvement activities do prevent behavioral problems. Interaction analyses suggest that the involvement of parents with low socioeconomic status may be more effective than that of parents with high socioeconomic status. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Domina, Thurston. "Leveling the Home Advantage: Assessing the Effectiveness of Parental Involvement in Elementary School." Sociology of Education 78,3 (July 2005): 233-249.
3. Sanabria, Tanya
Penner, Andrew M.
Domina, Thurston
Failing at Remediation? College Remedial Course-taking, Failure and Long-term Student Outcomes
Presented: Seattle WA, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2016
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): College Degree; College Major/Field of Study/Courses; Earnings; Educational Outcomes; Grade Point Average (GPA)/Grades; Schooling, Post-secondary

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Many students who enroll in post-secondary education are not adequately prepared to succeed in college-level courses. Colleges offer remedial coursework to help underprepared students. Despite the prevalence of remediation, previous research presents contradictory findings regarding the short and long-term effects of remediation. This paper contributes to this literature by examining whether the degree completion and wage outcomes associated with remedial education vary by whether students pass or fail remedial courses. Using the NLSY Postsecondary Transcript-1997 data we find that 40 percent of students who take remedial coursework fail one or more of their remedial courses, and that underrepresented minority students and students working more than 20 hours per week had higher odds of failing remedial coursework. Students who took and passed their remedial coursework had higher odds of graduating from college and had higher earnings than students who did not take remedial coursework, but students who failed at least one remedial course had lower odds of degree completion and earned 5 percent lower wages over a five-year average. Our findings suggest that while many students may benefit from remedial education, a substantial number of students struggle with remedial coursework.
Bibliography Citation
Sanabria, Tanya, Andrew M. Penner and Thurston Domina. "Failing at Remediation? College Remedial Course-taking, Failure and Long-term Student Outcomes." Presented: Seattle WA, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2016.