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Author: Denice, Patrick A.
Resulting in 3 citations.
1. Denice, Patrick A.
Does It Pay to Attend a For-Profit College? Horizontal Stratification in Higher Education
M.A. Thesis, University of Washington, 2012
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: ProQuest Dissertations & Theses (PQDT)
Keyword(s): College Education; Colleges; Earnings; Educational Returns

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Mostly absent from the research investigating the economic returns to postsecondary education are examinations of the economic value of attending a for-profit institution, despite this sector's rapid growth over the past decade. Using the most recent available wave of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997, I find that individuals who pursued their postsecondary education at a for-profit college earn significantly lower weekly compensation than individuals who did not attend a for-profit college. This difference is robust to the addition of individual, regional, and employment controls, and it is particularly concentrated among 2-year degree holders, women, and those working in the management and professional fields. Implications for the horizontal stratification of higher education are explored.
Bibliography Citation
Denice, Patrick A. Does It Pay to Attend a For-Profit College? Horizontal Stratification in Higher Education. M.A. Thesis, University of Washington, 2012.
2. Denice, Patrick A.
Does It Pay to Attend a For-profit College? Vertical and Horizontal Stratification in Higher Education
Social Science Research 52 (July 2015): 161-178.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0049089X15000526
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): College Characteristics; College Education; Educational Attainment; Stratification; Wages

Despite the recent growth of for-profit colleges, scholars are only beginning to understand the labor market consequences of attending these institutions. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997, I find that for-profit associate's degree holders encounter lower hourly earnings than associate's degree holders educated at public or private, nonprofit colleges, and earnings that are not significantly different than high school graduates. However, individuals who complete a bachelor's degree by attending college in either the for-profit or nonprofit sectors encounter positive returns. These findings, robust to model selection, suggest that the distinction between for-profit and nonprofit colleges constitutes an important axis in the horizontal dimension of education at the sub-baccalaureate level, and complicate notions of vertical stratification such that higher levels of educational attainment do not necessarily guarantee a wage premium.
Bibliography Citation
Denice, Patrick A. "Does It Pay to Attend a For-profit College? Vertical and Horizontal Stratification in Higher Education." Social Science Research 52 (July 2015): 161-178.
3. Denice, Patrick A.
Trajectories through Postsecondary Education and Students' Life Course Transitions
Social Science Research 80 (May 2019): 243-260.
Also: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0049089X18303442
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Educational Attainment; Life Course; Post-Secondary Transcripts

Today's college students travel increasingly heterogeneous pathways through their postsecondary education by delaying the transition from high school to college, attending part-time, and enrolling in multiple institutions. Variation in how students move through college is important to concerns about stratification since non-normative pathways are disproportionately distributed among student subgroups and can have negative consequences for degree attainment and other later-in-life outcomes. In this article, I capitalize on detailed postsecondary transcript data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 to infer group-based developmental trajectories of students' college credit completion over the first ten years since leaving high school. These trajectories offer a more comprehensive understanding of students' long-term pathways of college credit completion in life course perspective, the role played by students' socioeconomic and prior academic backgrounds in allocating them to those pathways, and how transitions to other adult social roles (spouse, parent, and worker) differentially shape those pathways.
Bibliography Citation
Denice, Patrick A. "Trajectories through Postsecondary Education and Students' Life Course Transitions." Social Science Research 80 (May 2019): 243-260.