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Author: Davis, Mary E.
Resulting in 3 citations.
1. Davis, Mary E.
Health Effects of Night and Irregular Shift Work
Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine published online (13 November 2020): DOI: 10.1097/JOM.0000000000002084.
Also: https://journals.lww.com/joem/Abstract/9000/Health_Effects_of_Night_and_Irregular_Shift_Work_.98029.aspx
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
Keyword(s): Health, Chronic Conditions; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Shift Workers; Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Objectives: Evidence suggests that shift work results in adverse occupational health outcomes. This paper contributes to the literature by estimating the separate health effects of night and irregular shift work on longitudinal panel of US workers.

Methods: Data from a 20-year panel of worker surveys from the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth were used to predict self-reported health limitations related to night and irregular shift work using a series of random effects logit models.

Results: Separate and combined specifications of shift work as night and irregular effort significantly increase the odds of health limitations compared to working a regular daytime schedule, with more pronounced effects for irregular work (OR = 1.09-1.52) over night shift (OR = 1.03-1.14).

Conclusions: The results suggest that both night and irregular shift work may have important negative implications on occupational health, with the deleterious effects particularly pronounced for irregularly scheduled work effort.

Bibliography Citation
Davis, Mary E. "Health Effects of Night and Irregular Shift Work." Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine published online (13 November 2020): DOI: 10.1097/JOM.0000000000002084.
2. Davis, Mary E.
Hoyt, Eric
A Longitudinal Study of Piece Rate and Health: Evidence and Implications for Workers in the US Gig Economy
Public Health 180 (March 2020): 1-9.
Also: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0033350619303415
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Health, Chronic Conditions; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Modeling, Logit; Modeling, Random Effects; Performance pay; Wage Rates

Methods: Data from six survey waves of the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth collected between 1988 and 2000 are used in a random-effects logit model to predict self-reported health limitations related to piece rate, while controlling for worker, work environment, lifestyle, time, and location trends.

Results: Pay tied to piece rate in current or prior periods significantly increases the odds of self-reported health limitations compared with salaried work (odds ratio [OR]: 1.4-1.8). These effects are elevated for the subgroups of low-wage (OR: 1.5-1.8), female (OR: 1.8-1.9), and non-white (OR: 2.0-2.1) workers compared with their high-wage, male, and white peers.

Bibliography Citation
Davis, Mary E. and Eric Hoyt. "A Longitudinal Study of Piece Rate and Health: Evidence and Implications for Workers in the US Gig Economy." Public Health 180 (March 2020): 1-9.
3. Davis, Mary E.
Hoyt, Eric
The Effect of Performance Pay on US Workers' Physical and Emotional Health
Presented: Washington DC, Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management (APPAM) Annual Fall Research Conference, November 2018
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management (APPAM)
Keyword(s): Health, Mental; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Modeling, Random Effects; Performance pay

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The unintended consequences of performance pay on worker health and well-being is becoming increasingly relevant with the growth of the on-demand service sector in the US, also known as the gig economy. Workers in this industry are rewarded for effort during periods of peak demand, which often occur on a part-time, irregular, and/or night schedule, all of which have also been linked to negative worker health outcomes. As this sector continues to grow, it is important to understand and anticipate the effects of wage and work structure on the health and well-being of the US workforce, evidence that will ideally be used support effective policy mechanisms and controls to protect workers.

This paper explores these hypotheses using data from the US National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 and 1997 cohorts. The NLSY79 dataset follows a cohort of approximately 10,000 respondents born between 1957 and 1964, with data available in survey waves from 1979 to 2014; while the NLSY97 follows another cohort of nearly 9,000 respondents born between 1980 and 1984, with data available between 1997 and 2015. A random effects logit model is used to track and identify individual health outcomes as workers in these cohorts move in and out of performance pay, isolating the impact over time and testing for cumulative effects. The results identify a statistically significant link between performance pay and poor worker health, effects that are attenuated for susceptible sub-groups of workers, including female, minority, and low-income workers.

Bibliography Citation
Davis, Mary E. and Eric Hoyt. "The Effect of Performance Pay on US Workers' Physical and Emotional Health." Presented: Washington DC, Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management (APPAM) Annual Fall Research Conference, November 2018.