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Author: Burgard, Sarah
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. Burgard, Sarah
Zajacova, Anna
Dyer, Shauna
Wage Gains, but Few Health Returns to Some College: A Role for Employment Histories?
Presented: Chicago IL, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2017
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): College Enrollment; Employment, History; Health, Mental; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Recent evidence suggests that adults with some college but less than a bachelor's degree do not have better health than high school graduates, countering the standard expectation for an educational gradient. We propose that relatively unstable, suboptimal employment histories could account for the lack of health gains from their additional schooling. Using the NLSY97, we examine (1) employment histories by educational attainment among young adults with postsecondary schooling, and (2) assess whether varying employment histories explain educational differences in physical and mental health. Preliminary results suggest that adults with some college earn more than HS graduates but are not different in their health scores or number of job changes, and they are more likely to work night or irregular shifts. Cross-sectional employment characteristics do not explain the health pattern at the some-college level, but employment history analyses (pending) may reveal a stronger effect of this mediator. [Also presented at Montreal, QC, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2017]
Bibliography Citation
Burgard, Sarah, Anna Zajacova and Shauna Dyer. "Wage Gains, but Few Health Returns to Some College: A Role for Employment Histories?" Presented: Chicago IL, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2017.
2. Zajacova, Anna
Burgard, Sarah
Postsecondary Education and Mental Health: Effects of Earned Credits versus Credentials
Presented: Seattle WA, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2016
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): College Degree; College Major/Field of Study/Courses; Depression (see also CESD); Educational Attainment; Grade Point Average (GPA)/Grades; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Modeling, OLS; Schooling, Post-secondary

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Does the quantity of education obtained or the specific credentials earned matter more for adult mental health? These two alternatives reflect competing theories of the association between educational attainment and adult mental and physical health --human capital theory and credential theory-- but have been difficult to adjudicate between in past research. We use the new Postsecondary Transcript Files addendum to the NLSY97 that includes detailed information on both the number of postsecondary credits obtained and specific credentials earned to provide new leverage. We focus on depressive symptoms as a particularly salient health dimension in early adulthood. We analyze the data using multiple approaches within the regression (OLS, fixed-effects) and structural equation frameworks. Results show that more credits and higher credentials are each independently associated with fewer depressive symptoms. However, if we stratify by or control the terminal postsecondary credential (none, AA, or BA), more earned credits are not associated with additional gains in mental health, suggesting stronger support for credential theory.
Bibliography Citation
Zajacova, Anna and Sarah Burgard. "Postsecondary Education and Mental Health: Effects of Earned Credits versus Credentials." Presented: Seattle WA, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2016.