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Author: Berdahl, Terceira Ann
Resulting in 3 citations.
1. Berdahl, Terceira Ann
Occupational Injuries in the United States: A Longitudinal Analysis of Race-Gender Differences
Ph.D. Dissertation, The University of Nebraska - Lincoln, 2005. DAI-A 66/08, p. 3097, Feb 2006
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: ProQuest Dissertations & Theses (PQDT)
Keyword(s): Education; Gender Differences; Hispanics; Human Capital Theory; Injuries; Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study uses the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (1979) to evaluate race-gender differences in workplace injuries across time (1988-1998). I applied two labor market theories to explain race and gender differences in work injuries: structural devaluation theory and individual human capital theory. Both structural devaluation and individual human capital variables contributed to explaining some of the race and gender differences in risk trajectories. Regardless of individual race and gender, occupational racial-ethnic minority concentrations increase the risk of injury, supporting structural devaluation theory. Human capital theory also contributed to the models, and education was a strong buffer against occupational injuries. There was evidence of differentiated declines in risk across the 1990s by race and gender.

Six subgroups of workers from a random sample of youth who entered the labor market in 1979 were studied: white women, black women, Hispanic women, white men, black men, and Hispanic men. Using an intersectionality framework, I establish that occupational injuries differ by race-gender. Race-gender differences in the initial odds of injury, time trajectories, and relationships between substantive predictors support an intersectionality framework. Differences in injury risk across time were documented and modeled using a Hierarchical Generalized Linear Modeling framework. Non-Hispanic white men began the study with the greatest risk of injury, while minority men had the lowest risk of injury. Across the 1990's differences between race-gender subgroups diminished. Non-Hispanic whites and black women have the greatest risk of injury in later waves.

Bibliography Citation
Berdahl, Terceira Ann. Occupational Injuries in the United States: A Longitudinal Analysis of Race-Gender Differences. Ph.D. Dissertation, The University of Nebraska - Lincoln, 2005. DAI-A 66/08, p. 3097, Feb 2006.
2. Berdahl, Terceira Ann
Racial/Ethnic and Gender Differences in Individual Workplace Injury Risk Trajectories: 1988-1998
American Journal of Public Health 98,12 (December 2008): 2258-2263.
Also: http://ajph.aphapublications.org/cgi/content/abstract/98/12/2258
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Public Health Association
Keyword(s): Ethnic Differences; Gender Attitudes/Roles; Injuries, Workplace; Insurance, Health; Mobility, Job; Occupational Segregation; Racial Differences; Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Objectives. I examined workplace injury risk overtime and across racial/ethnic and gender groups to observe patterns of change and to understand how occupational characteristics and job mobility influence these changes. Methods. I used hierarchical generalized linear models to estimate-individual workplace injury and illness risk overtime ("trajectories") for a cohort of American workers who participated in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (1988-1998). Results. Significant temporal variation in injury risk was observed across racial/ ethnic and gender groups. At baseline, White men had a high risk of injury relative to the other groups and experienced the greatest decline over time. Latino men demonstrated a pattern of lower injury risk across time compared with White men. Among both Latinos and non-Latino Whites, women had lower odds of injury than did men. Non-Latino Black women's injury risk was similar to Black men's and greater than that for both Latino and non-Latino White women. Occupational characteristics and job mobility partly explained these differences. Conclusions. Disparities between racial/ethnic and gender groups were dynamic and changed over time. Workplace injury risk was associated with job dimensions such as work schedule, union representation, health insurance, job hours, occupational racial segregation, and occupational environmental hazards. (Am J Public Health. 2008;98:2258-2263. doi:10.2105/AJPH.2006.103135) [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Berdahl, Terceira Ann. "Racial/Ethnic and Gender Differences in Individual Workplace Injury Risk Trajectories: 1988-1998." American Journal of Public Health 98,12 (December 2008): 2258-2263.
3. Berdahl, Terceira Ann
McQuillan, Julta
Occupational Racial Composition and Nonfatal Work Injuries
Social Problems 55,4 (November 2008): 549-572.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/pss/10.1525/sp.2008.55.4.549
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: University of California Press
Keyword(s): Gender Differences; Injuries, Workplace; Labor Market Outcomes; Occupational Segregation; Racial Differences; Racial Equality/Inequality; Social Influences

Is there an association between occupational racial composition and nonfatal workplace injuries? Guided by several labor market theories (queuing, social closure, devaluation, poor market position, and human capital), we use occupational data from the U.S. Census and Dictionary of Occupational Titles combined with individual data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth to answer this question. Hierarchical generalized linear models of individuals within occupations show that there is an association between occupational racial composition and workplace injuries, but this association is only statistically significant for white men in the model controlling for relevant occupational and individual level characteristics. A 10 percent increase in the occupation percent black is associated with a 28 percent increase in injury risk. Contrary to expectations, white men have the highest adjusted odds of injury; white women and black men have significantly lower odds of injury than white men. Additionally, occupation-level environmental hazards and individual-level education, hours worked per week, jobs with insurance benefits, working in the South, and specific industries are associated with differential injury risk. These findings are consistent with labor market theories that suggest social closure, market position, and individual skills contribute to differential labor market outcomes. We demonstrate that sociological theories of labor market inequality are useful for understanding workplace injury risk, and that workplace injuries should be studied as an outcome of social inequality. Reprinted by permission of the publisher.
Bibliography Citation
Berdahl, Terceira Ann and Julta McQuillan. "Occupational Racial Composition and Nonfatal Work Injuries." Social Problems 55,4 (November 2008): 549-572.