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Author: Anderson, Carolyn S.
Resulting in 3 citations.
1. Anderson, Carolyn S.
Alienation, Labor Market Structure, and Women's Attachment to the Labor Force: The Impact of Part-Time Industries on Discontinuous Labor Force Participation
Presented: Cincinnati, OH, American Statistical Association Annual Meetings, August 1991
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: American Statistical Association
Keyword(s): Employment, Intermittent; Job Patterns; Part-Time Work; Racial Differences; Work Attachment

Data from the Mature Women cohort of the 1969-1984 NLS indicate that employment in industries that depend on part-time workers is found to have lasting effects on black and white working women's long-term attachment to the labor force. The experience of black women working in the private household services industry illustrates that workers without institutional credentials and supports must depend on personal reserves of motivation and perseverance in the face of such constraints on attachment. [Sociological Abstracts, Inc]
Bibliography Citation
Anderson, Carolyn S. "Alienation, Labor Market Structure, and Women's Attachment to the Labor Force: The Impact of Part-Time Industries on Discontinuous Labor Force Participation." Presented: Cincinnati, OH, American Statistical Association Annual Meetings, August 1991.
2. Anderson, Carolyn S.
Part-Time Industry, Women's Attachment to the Labor Force, and the Hourly Wage
Working Paper, Center for the Study of Urban Poverty, University of California - Los Angeles, [N.D.]
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: Center for the Study of Urban Poverty, University of California, Los Angeles
Keyword(s): Employment, Part-Time; Labor Force Participation; Labor Market Segmentation; Occupations, Female; Racial Differences; Wages, Women; Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper analyzes the effects of part-time industries that depend on part-time workers, women's wages, and attachment to the labor force. The institutionalization of part-time labor markets has accompanied the increased labor force participation of married women and mothers since World War II. While much has been made of the accommodation of industry to women's need for part-time work, the growth of part-time jobs now outpaces the growth in the number of workers who work part-time because they choose to do so and more women workers than ever before are limited to part-time work despite their stated preference for full-time work. The analyses of data are from the 1967-1984 panels of the Mature Women Cohort of the National Longitudinal Surveys which show that part- time industries impose lasting constraints on the hourly wage and ongoing attachment to the labor force for both black and white women workers irrespective of whether they work full- or part-time.
Bibliography Citation
Anderson, Carolyn S. "Part-Time Industry, Women's Attachment to the Labor Force, and the Hourly Wage." Working Paper, Center for the Study of Urban Poverty, University of California - Los Angeles, [N.D.].
3. Anderson, Carolyn S.
Psychosocial Correlates of Women's Attachment to the Labor Force
Ph.D. Dissertation, University of California - Los Angeles, 1991
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: UMI - University Microfilms, Bell and Howell Information and Learning
Keyword(s): Educational Attainment; Family Size; Internal-External Attitude; Intrinsic/Extrinsic Rewards; Locus of Control (see Rotter Scale); Racial Differences; Rotter Scale (see Locus of Control); Wages; Women's Roles; Work Attachment

This study explores women's attachment to the labor force in term of three major subjective factors: powerlessness, or locus of control; attitudes toward the work role; and intrinsic engagement in work. These are shown to complement the influence of objective factors associated with attachment. Attachment is dependent upon involuntary factors such as those inherent in the structure of part- and full-time labor markets, as well as on individuals' other objective characteristics, including human capital and fertility. Subjective characteristics of workers are grounded in these objective realities, but independently influence labor market behavior under certain conditions. The data are taken from the NLS Mature Women Cohort of the NLS 1967-1984. Methodologies used include anova and stepwise regression procedures, which are performed separately for the white and black cohorts. The most important influence on attachment among black workers is the constraint by education level on entry into jobs which ensure ongoing attachment. Normative belief in the work role, which predicts attachment for both racial cohorts, is relative to socioeconomic status and family characteristics: those with lower wages and more children lack such beliefs. Among white workers, those who perceive that work is economically necessary are more likely to remain attached. For those who lack an economic rationale, attachment has a voluntary aspect. For those who need to work but are unable to secure jobs in industries which ensure attachment, ongoing participation is not always at the worker's own volition. Intrinsic engagement in work is not related to attachment. Other forces, principally the economic needs of many women to support their families, are hypothesized to override lack of intrinsic motivation.
Bibliography Citation
Anderson, Carolyn S. Psychosocial Correlates of Women's Attachment to the Labor Force. Ph.D. Dissertation, University of California - Los Angeles, 1991.