An Introduction

National Longitudinal Survey of Older and Young Men

An Introduction

 

Older Men's Sample: An Introduction

Official Title: National Longitudinal Survey of Older Men, part of the Original Cohorts from the National Longitudinal Surveys (NLS) program.

Status of Survey:  Not active. The most recent interviews of the Older Men respondents took place in 1990.

Age of cohort: Born between 1906 and 1921. At the time of first interview (1966), respondents' ages ranged from 45 to 59. The respondents were 69 to 83 at the time of their last interviews in 1990.

Number of respondents in survey: 5,020 individuals were initially interviewed in round 1. For the last fielding period in 1990, a total of 2,092 men were interviewed, 41.7% of the original sample. (The 1990 survey also collected information about deceased respondents from 1,341 widows and 865 other family members, so information is available for 85.6% of the original sample members.)

Gender: All men (although the widows of the Older Men were interviewed in the final fielding period). The NLS Original Cohorts project also interviewed two women's cohorts, the Young Women and the Mature Women.

Race/ Ethnicity (in initial survey):

  • White: 3,518 (70%)
  • Black: 1,420 (28.3%)
  • Other: 82 (1.6%)

Number of survey rounds available to the public: 13 rounds. Older Men respondents were surveyed annually between 1966-1969. After that, they were interviewed three years out of every five until 1983. In 1990, a final interview was conducted with both living Older Men respondents and widows or other family members of deceased respondents. Public data are available for no charge at www.nlsinfo.org/investigator.

Types of information gathered in survey:

  • Work Experience, including Retirement
  • Education
  • Household Composition
  • Family Background
  • Marital Status and Marital Transitions
  • Income and Assets
  • Health
  • Attitudes

Funding Sources for the NLS-OM: The Older Men interviews were originally sponsored by the Office of Manpower, Automation, and Training (now the Employment and Training Administration), part of the U.S. Department of Labor. The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) currently oversees the NLS program. The National Institute on Aging sponsored the 1990 interview.

 

Young Men's Sample: An Introduction

Official Title: National Longitudinal Survey of Young Men, part of the Original Cohorts from the National Longitudinal Surveys (NLS) program.

Status of Survey:  Not active. The most recent interviews of the Young Men respondents took place in 1981.

Age of cohort: Born between 1941 and 1952. At the time of first interview (1966), respondents' ages ranged from 14 to 24. The respondents were 29 to 39 at the time of their last interviews in 1981.

Number of respondents in survey: 5,225 individuals were initially interviewed in round 1. For the last fielding period in 1981, a total of 3,398 were interviewed, 65% of the original sample. 

Gender: All men. The NLS Original Cohorts project also interviewed the Young Women cohort that was the same 14-24 age range, as well as the older Mature Women cohort.

Race/ Ethnicity (in initial survey):

  • White: 3,734 (71.5%)
  • Black: 1,438 (27.5%)
  • Other: 53 (1.0%)

Number of survey rounds available to the public: 12 rounds. Young Men respondents were surveyed annually between 1966-1971. After that, they were interviewed three years out of every five through the final 1981 survey year. Public data are available for no charge at www.nlsinfo.org/investigator.

Types of information gathered in survey:

  • Work Experience, including Military Service
  • Education
  • Household Composition
  • Family Background
  • Marital Status and Marital Transitions
  • Income and Assets
  • Health
  • Attitudes

Funding Sources for the NLS-YM: The Young Men interviews were originally sponsored by the Office of Manpower, Automation, and Training (now the Employment and Training Administration), part of the U.S. Department of Labor. The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) currently oversees the NLS program.