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Title: Employer Provided Pension Data in the NLS Mature Women's Survey and in the Health and Retirement Study
Resulting in 1 citation.
1. Gustman, Alan L.
Steinmeier, Thomas L.
Employer Provided Pension Data in the NLS Mature Women's Survey and in the Health and Retirement Study
In: Worker Well-Being, Research in Labor Economics, Volume 19. S.W. Polachek, ed. New York, NY: JAI Press, 2000: pp. 215-252
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: JAI Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Benefits; Gender Differences; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Pensions; Retirement; Wealth

Compared pension wealth and accruals created by employer-provided pension plans between men and women and between respondents of 2 national surveys. The National Longitudinal Survey of Mature Women (NLS-MW) is a panel study of women who were aged 30-44 in 1967. The Health and Retirement Study (HRS) is a panel study of households with at least one member who was aged 51-61 in 1992. Thus, both surveys include populations that have recently retired, or are about to. Detailed pension plan descriptions were collected from employers in both studies. These data suggest that men hold pensions that are much more valuable than the pensions held by women and that these differences are largely explained by differences in earnings. Benefit earnings ratios were actually higher for women than men, reflecting the longer life expectancy of women. Women's pensions increased in value more rapidly than men's, because women had lower tenure. Pension values for covered respondents were similar between the 2 surveys; however, pension accrual profiles differed. Among all the differences between the surveys, the most important difference is that pension coverage was lower in the NLS-MW than in the HRS. As a result, pension wealth was lower in the NLS-MW. (AR) (AgeLine Database, copyright 2002 AARP, all rights reserved)
Bibliography Citation
Gustman, Alan L. and Thomas L. Steinmeier. "Employer Provided Pension Data in the NLS Mature Women's Survey and in the Health and Retirement Study" In: Worker Well-Being, Research in Labor Economics, Volume 19. S.W. Polachek, ed. New York, NY: JAI Press, 2000: pp. 215-252