Search Results

Title: Association between Long Work Hours and Chronic Disease Risks over a 32 Year Period
Resulting in 1 citation.
1. Yao, Xiaoxi
Dembe, Allard
Shoben, Abigail
Association between Long Work Hours and Chronic Disease Risks over a 32 Year Period
Presented: New Orleans LA, American Public Health Association Annual Meeting and Expo, November 2014
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Public Health Association
Keyword(s): Gender Differences; Health, Chronic Conditions; Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Methods:The National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1979 was used to create 32-year work histories (1978-2009) for 7,492 respondents. The average weekly work hours were calculated for each week in which the employee worked full time (i.e., at least 30 hours per week). Logistic regression analyses were performed to test the association between the average hours worked per week and the occurrence of each of the eight chronic diseases listed above, adjusting for age, gender, race, education, family income, number of years worked, smoking status, and occupation.

Results: Working long hours (e.g., 41-50, 51-60 and 60+ compared to 30-40 hours per week) was associated with a significantly elevated risk of chronic heart disease, non-skin cancer, arthritis, and diabetes. The observed effects were larger and more significant among women than among men.

Bibliography Citation
Yao, Xiaoxi, Allard Dembe and Abigail Shoben. "Association between Long Work Hours and Chronic Disease Risks over a 32 Year Period." Presented: New Orleans LA, American Public Health Association Annual Meeting and Expo, November 2014.