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Title: Assimilation and the Timing of College Enrollment, Graduation, and Disruptive Events
Resulting in 1 citation.
1. Inkpen, Christopher
Assimilation and the Timing of College Enrollment, Graduation, and Disruptive Events
Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Sociology and Criminology, The Pennsylvania State University, 2017
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: ProQuest Dissertations & Theses (PQDT)
Keyword(s): Childbearing, Adolescent; College Enrollment; College Graduates; Ethnic Groups/Ethnicity; Family Background; Geocoded Data; High School Dropouts; Immigrants; Incarceration/Jail; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; State-Level Data/Policy

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This dissertation examines upward or downward assimilation by ethno-generation, a classification that considers a respondent's race or ethnicity as well as their generational status. In particular, I consider ethno-generational differences in college enrollment and completion in addition to the disruptive "turning point" events of high school dropout, early childbirth, arrest, and incarceration. This study focuses on distinctions between first and second-generation Mexicans and non-Hispanic whites and blacks. In addition, these analyses contrast first and second-generation Mexicans to third-generation Mexicans. This investigation also includes generational measures for Hispanics of "other" origin. This study analyzes these outcomes while applying tests for a number of theories of assimilation. I consider straight-line assimilation theory, neo-assimilation theory, segmented assimilation theory, and second-generation immigrant optimism theory as potential theoretical frameworks that explain postsecondary success and disruptive life course events. This analysis employs the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997, a nationally representative panel study that follows children aged 12-17 in 1997 throughout life documenting life course events and their experiences in school and the labor market. In addition to ethno-generational designations, I include measures for individual and family characteristics as well as time-varying life course measures.
Bibliography Citation
Inkpen, Christopher. Assimilation and the Timing of College Enrollment, Graduation, and Disruptive Events. Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Sociology and Criminology, The Pennsylvania State University, 2017.