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Source: Professional Psychology
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. Russo, Nancy Felipe
Dabul, Amy J.
The Relationship of Abortion to Well-Being. Do Race and Religion Make a Difference?
Professional Psychology: Research and Practice 28,1 (February 1997): 23-31.
Also: http://psycnet.apa.org/journals/pro/28/1/23/
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Psychological Association (APA)
Keyword(s): Abortion; Adolescent Behavior; Childbearing; Education; Ethnic Differences; Health, Mental; Income; Legislation; Racial Differences; Religion; Religious Influences; Well-Being

Relationships of abortion and childbearing to well-being were examined for 1,189 Black and 3,147 White women. Education, income, and having a work role were positively and independently related to well-being for all women. Abortion did not have an independent relationship to well-being, regardless of race or religion, when well-being before becoming pregnant was controlled. These findings suggest professional psychologists should explore the origins of women's mental health problems in experiences predating their experience with abortion, and they can assist psychologists in working to ensure that mandated scripts from "informed consent" legislation do not misrepresent scientific findings. ((c) 1997 APA/PsycINFO, all rights reserved).
Bibliography Citation
Russo, Nancy Felipe and Amy J. Dabul. "The Relationship of Abortion to Well-Being. Do Race and Religion Make a Difference?" Professional Psychology: Research and Practice 28,1 (February 1997): 23-31.
2. Russo, Nancy Felipe
Zierk, K.
Abortion, Childbearing, and Women's Well-Being
Professional Psychology, Research and Practice 23 (1992): 269-280.
Also: http://www.prochoiceforum.org.uk/psy_research5.asp
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Psychological Association (APA)
Keyword(s): Abortion; Adolescent Behavior; Childbearing; Data Quality/Consistency; Ethnic Differences; Fertility; Health, Mental; Legislation; Pregnancy and Pregnancy Outcomes; Racial Differences; Religious Influences; Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES) (see Self-Esteem); Self-Esteem; Well-Being

This study is based on a secondary analysis of NLSY interview data from 5,295 women who were interviewed annually from 1979 to 1987. Among this group 773 women were identified in 1987 as having at least one abortion, with 233 of them reporting repeat abortions. Well-being was assessed in 1980 and 1987 by the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale. The researchers used analysis of variance (ANOVA) and multiple regression to examine the combined and separate contributions of preabortion self-esteem, contextual variables (education, employment, income, and marital status), childbearing (being a parent, numbers of wanted and unwanted children) and abortion (having one abortion, having repeat abortions, number of abortions, time since last abortion) to women's post abortion self-esteem.
Bibliography Citation
Russo, Nancy Felipe and K. Zierk. "Abortion, Childbearing, and Women's Well-Being." Professional Psychology, Research and Practice 23 (1992): 269-280.