Search Results

Source: Journal of Economics and Finance
Resulting in 3 citations.
1. Chatterjee, Swarnankur
Zahirovic-Herbert, Velma
A Road to Assimilation: Immigrants and Financial Markets
Journal of Economics and Finance 38,2 (April 2014): 345-358.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12197-011-9224-5
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Assets; Financial Investments; Immigrants

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper compares the financial market participation of immigrants and native-born Americans. Financial asset ownership is examined after controlling for the immigrants’ country of origin using a nationally representative National Longitudinal Survey (NLSY79) data set. The determinants of preference for financial asset ownership and the amount of financial equity held by households are estimated using a two-stage procedure. The results indicate that immigrants are less likely to own financial assets and more likely to have lower financial equity than native-born residents. Income uncertainty and risk tolerance of immigrants are associated with their preference for financial investments. Immigrants’ years of residence in the United States also increase their financial asset ownership. A discussion of the implications of these findings for policy makers, immigration researchers, and scholars of household savings behavior is also included.
Bibliography Citation
Chatterjee, Swarnankur and Velma Zahirovic-Herbert. "A Road to Assimilation: Immigrants and Financial Markets ." Journal of Economics and Finance 38,2 (April 2014): 345-358.
2. Debeaumont, Ronald
Nsiah, Christian
Unemployment and Compensating Wages: An Analysis of Shift Work
Journal of Economics and Finance 34,2 (April 2010): 142-149
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/420208h88t521747/
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Labor Market Segmentation; Shift Workers; Unemployment; Wage Determination; Wage Differentials; Wages

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Compensating wages have been documented for a number of job attributes including working non-standard hours. Using data that aggregates across occupations, our analysis confirms a wage premium for working night shifts. However, the compensating wage is greater in areas where unemployment is low, suggesting that employers are less pressured to compensate for night shifts when employment opportunities are relatively scarce. If this result holds for other undesirable work characteristics, such as risk of death on the job, then weak labor markets will have lower compensating wages in general. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

Copyright of Journal of Economics & Finance is the property of Springer Science & Business Media B.V. and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)

Bibliography Citation
Debeaumont, Ronald and Christian Nsiah. "Unemployment and Compensating Wages: An Analysis of Shift Work ." Journal of Economics and Finance 34,2 (April 2010): 142-149.
3. Nsiah, Christian
Unemployment and Compensating Wages: An Analysis of Shift Work
Journal of Economics and Finance 34,2 (April 2010): 142-149.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs12197-009-9093-3
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Labor Market Demographics; Shift Workers; Wage Rates; Work Hours; Work, Atypical

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Compensating wages have been documented for a number of job attributes including working non-standard hours. Using data that aggregates across occupations, our analysis confirms a wage premium for working night shifts. However, the compensating wage is greater in areas where unemployment is low, suggesting that employers are less pressured to compensate for night shifts when employment opportunities are relatively scarce. If this result holds for other undesirable work characteristics, such as risk of death on the job, then weak labor markets will have lower compensating wages in general.
Bibliography Citation
Nsiah, Christian. "Unemployment and Compensating Wages: An Analysis of Shift Work ." Journal of Economics and Finance 34,2 (April 2010): 142-149.