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Source: International Journal of Social Economics
Resulting in 3 citations.
1. Srinivas, Sumati
Social Attitudes and the Gender Pay Gap in the USA in Recent Years
International Journal of Social Economics 34,4 (April 2007): 268-275.
Also: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journals.htm?issn=0306-8293&volume=34&issue=4&articleid=1595283&show=abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Emerald
Keyword(s): Gender Differences; Income; Labor Force Participation; Wage Gap; Women; Women's Roles

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Purpose -- Although the labor force participation rates for women in the USA have steadily risen during the last three decades, the gender pay gap has not decreased significantly since 1992. In fact, there is evidence that it actually widened during the 1990s. This paper seeks to present a social economics explanation of this phenomenon. Mainstream economic explanations for the anomalous behavior of the gender pay gap in the USA in recent years usually involve increasing numbers of women opting for part-time jobs. Recognizing the importance of social change in explaining certain features of the labor market, this paper aims to explore whether a broad change in social attitudes towards women's roles may form the basis for such phenomena. Design/methodology/approach -- A unique set of questions from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth which asks the same respondents about their attitudes towards "traditional" roles for women in 1987 and again in 2004 allows measurement of the change in attitudes in individual respondents. The survey population is then partitioned into those whose attitudes towards women's roles became "more traditional" and "less traditional," and the gender pay gap, as well as other characteristics, of each sub-population is analyzed. Findings -- Of respondents who reported a significant change in their attitude towards women's roles between 1987 and 2004, a larger number of respondents became more traditional in their views, agreeing with statements such as "a woman's place is in the home." A majority of those with college or professional degrees became more traditional in their attitudes, whereas a majority of those with a high school education became less traditional. Being a woman was significant and negatively correlated with an increase in pay among respondents who became more traditional, whereas no significant correlation was observed among those who became less traditional in their social attitudes. Originality/value -- The results indicate that social attitudes towards women's roles in the USA may have become more traditional during the 1990s, which is a new finding. The correlation found between social attitudes and women's pay provides an insight into why the gender pay gap persists despite the greatly increased labor force participation rates of women.... [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

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Bibliography Citation
Srinivas, Sumati. "Social Attitudes and the Gender Pay Gap in the USA in Recent Years." International Journal of Social Economics 34,4 (April 2007): 268-275.
2. Steen, Todd P.
Religion and Earnings: Evidence from the NLS Youth Cohort
International Journal of Social Economics 23,1 (1996): 47-58.
Also: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journals.htm?articleid=1502468&show=pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Emerald
Keyword(s): Earnings; Male Sample; Religion

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper estimates human capital earnings functions to examine earnings differentials and rates of return to human capital for men from different religious backgrounds. The data for this analysis are taken from the National Longitudinal Survey (NLS) Youth Cohort (1979-1991).
Bibliography Citation
Steen, Todd P. "Religion and Earnings: Evidence from the NLS Youth Cohort." International Journal of Social Economics 23,1 (1996): 47-58.
3. Steen, Todd P.
The Relationship Between Religion and Earnings: Recent Evidence from the NLS Youth Cohort
International Journal of Social Economics 31,5/6 (2004): 572-582.
Also: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journals.htm?articleid=847867&show=abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Emerald
Keyword(s): Earnings; Ethnic Studies; Family Background; Human Capital; Labor Economics; Racial Studies; Religion

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Does religious and denominational background affect earnings and human capital investment? This paper examines religious background and human capital formation for a sample of males from the year 2000 wave of the National Longitudinal Survey Youth 1979 Cohort. This survey provides information that makes it possible to control better for many components of family background in order to isolate the impact of religion and denomination. The paper contains results from analyses of men within broad religious categories as well as within various Protestant denominations, and reports results for different racial and ethnic groups. The method used for the analysis is the estimation of human capital earnings functions. The paper finds evidence that both men raised as Catholics and men raised as Jews have higher earnings, holding other characteristics constant.
Bibliography Citation
Steen, Todd P. "The Relationship Between Religion and Earnings: Recent Evidence from the NLS Youth Cohort." International Journal of Social Economics 31,5/6 (2004): 572-582.