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Source: Educational Research Quarterly - ERQ
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. Suh, Suhyun
Suh, Jingyo
Changing Pattern and Process of High School Dropouts between 1980s and 2000s
Educational Research Quarterly 34,4 (June 2011): 3-13
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: School of Education, University of Southern California - Los Angeles
Keyword(s): Family Influences; High School Dropouts; Methods/Methodology; Regions

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

There has been a general decline in the dropout rate and an increase in the high school completion rate over the last three decades. This research investigates causes for the decline in the dropout rate over the periods using decomposition analysis. Traditional cross-section analysis was inadequate to perform this task. Using the two cohort surveys of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) in the 1980s and 2000s, we separated changes in characteristics into two parts: explained change and unexplained change. Results of the research suggest that the common explanations for the characteristic of school dropout account for little of the decline of the rate. Relatively unnoticeable factors such as location and regions contributed to the decline of the dropout rate while socioeconomic, personal, familial factors contributed to increase the dropout rate. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

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Bibliography Citation
Suh, Suhyun and Jingyo Suh. "Changing Pattern and Process of High School Dropouts between 1980s and 2000s." Educational Research Quarterly 34,4 (June 2011): 3-13.
2. Turner, Charlie G.
Monk-Turner, Elizabeth A.
The Returns to Education and Degrees
Educational Research Quarterly 26,3 (March 2003): 45-56.
Also: http://search.epnet.com/direct.asp?an=10145150&db=aph
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: School of Education, University of Southern California - Los Angeles
Keyword(s): College Graduates; Educational Returns; Labor Market Outcomes

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Differences in earning ability and returns to the associate's and bachelor's degrees are analyzed for the National Longitudinal Survey ofYouth. The average age of the sample is 27. Each additional year of education past high school yields an economic return of 1.9%. Only bachelor's degree recipients enjoy an economic advantage on completion of the degree (10%); associate and vocational degree holders do not significantly benefit from a "sheepskin" effect. Besides years of education and the bachelor's degree, being white, male, older, having more work experience, living outside the South, being in an SMSA, married, and having the bachelor's degree as an educational goal are all positively associated with higher wages.
Bibliography Citation
Turner, Charlie G. and Elizabeth A. Monk-Turner. "The Returns to Education and Degrees." Educational Research Quarterly 26,3 (March 2003): 45-56.